Descendants of Ibn Saud

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Descendants of Ibn Saud
Emblem of Saudi Arabia.svg
Ibn Saud.png
The founder of Saudi Arabia
Current region Saudi Arabia

Ibn Saud (1875–1953), the founder and first king of Saudi Arabia, was very young when he first married. However his wife died shortly after their marriage. Ibn Saud remarried at eighteen and his firstborn child was Turki.[1] He had 45 sons of whom 36 survived to adulthood and had children of their own.[2] He also had many daughters. His number of wives is put at 22.[3]

Wives and their children

This is a list of the first generation of offspring of Ibn Saud, sorted by his numerous wives. Many of the sons of Ibn Saud served in prominent leadership positions in Saudi Arabia including all of the nation's monarchs since his death. Those who served as King are in bold.

Sharifa bint Saqr Al Fajri

Ibn Sauds' first wife. She was from Bani Khalid and married Ibn Saud in 1894, but died six months after.[4]

Wadhah bint Muhammad Al Hussein Al Orair

The daughter of Muhammed and Abta Sardah,[5][6] Wadhah belong to Bani Khalid.[7][8][9] Some reports state she is from the Qahtan tribe.[7][10][11][12][13] Ibn Saud and Wadhah have at least four children.[14]

Name Lifespan Notes
Turki (I) 1900–1919 Nominal heir in Riyadh and Najd
Saud 12 January 1902 – 23 February 1969 Crown Prince from 1932; King (1953–1964), Deposed and exiled.
Khalid 1902–1909
Munira She married her full first cousin Fahd, the son of her paternal full uncle Sa'ad Al Abd al-Rahman[15] and daughter of her step mother. She also married Khalid bin Muhammad bin Abd al-Rahman Al Abd al-Rahman the son of her uncle and her step mothers sister Sarah bint Abdullah Al Sheikh. He died in 1972.[citation needed]
Nura[citation needed]
Abdullah[citation needed]

Sarah bint Abdullah bin Faisal

In approximately 1900 Sarah married Ibn Saud, but she bore him no sons.[4] She later married Turki bin Abdallah bin Saud Al Saud and then Abd al-Aziz bin Musaid bin Jiluwi Al Jiluwi. Her mother was the aunt of Ibn Saud's first wife.[16]

Tarfah bint Abdullah Al Sheikh

Tarfah belongs to the Al Sheikh clan.[17][18] Her father was Abdullah bin Abdullatif. She married Ibn Saud in 1902[19] and had at least five children with him.[13]

Name Lifespan Notes
Khalid (I) (born 1903, died in 1904)
Faisal (April 1906 – 25 March 1975) Was Prime Minister and Regent prior to deposing his brother; King (1964–1975); murdered.
Saad (I) (1914–1919) Robert Lacey in his book The Kingdom states that Princess Hassa actually mothered Saad.(pages 174 and 526) Also said by other sources[4]
Anud (born 1917, date of death unknown)
Nura (1903–1938) She married her half first cousin Khalid, the son of her paternal half uncle Muhammad Al Abd al-Rahman[20][21]

Lulua bint Salih Al Dakhil

Ibn Saud and Lulua had at least one child [22]

Name Lifespan Notes
Fahd (I) (1906–1919)

Al Jawhara bint Musaed Al Jiluwi

Ibn Saud and Al Jawhara had at least three children

Name Lifespan Notes
Muhammad (1910–1988) nicknamed Abu Al-Sharayn ("Father of the two evils"); Held many ministries under his father and older brother Saud. Led revolt against Saud and was briefly de jure Crown Prince before ceding the job to his full brother Khalid.
Khalid (II) (13 February 1913 – 13 June 1982) Crown Prince 1965—75; King 1975–1982
Al Anoud

Lajah bint Khalid bin Hithlayn

Ibn Saud and Lajah had at least one child.[citation needed]

Name Lifespan Notes
Sara (1916 – June 2002)[citation needed]

Bazza (I)

Bazza (I) was a Moroccan woman.[13][23][24] Ibn Saud and Bazza had at least one child.

Name Lifespan Notes
Nasser[25] (1911–1984) His brother died from alcohol poisoning, while at a party Nasser hosted, while he was governor of Riyadh. He was later excluded from all positions and disgraced.[citation needed]

Jawhara bint Saad bin Abdul Muhsin al Sudairi

Jawhara bint Saad Al Sudairi[26] Jawhara bint Saad was the sister of Haya bint Saad who was also spouse of King Abdulaziz and the mother of Prince Badr, late Prince Abdul Majid and Prince Abdul Illah.[26] Ibn Saud and Jawhara had at least four children.

Name Lifespan Notes
Sa'ad (II) (1915–1993) Bypassed for throne, given chairmanship of royal family council of Al Saud (precursor of Allegiance Council) as consolation prize.
Musa'id (1923–2013)[27] Disgraced when son murdered King Faisal. Bypassed from succession.[citation needed]
Abdul Mohsin (1925–1985)
Al Bandari (1928–2008)[28]

Hassa Al Sudairi

Her lifespan was 1900–1969.

  1. Fahd (II) (1921 – 1 August 2005); King (1982–2005)
  2. Sultan (1928–2011); Crown Prince (2005–2011)
  3. Luluwah (ca. 1928–2008)[29]
  4. Abdul Rahman (1931–2017); Deputy Minister of Defense and Aviation (1978–2011), removed from Succession.
  5. Nayef (1933–2012); Crown Prince (27 October 2011 – 16 June 2012)
  6. Turki (II) (1934–2016); Deputy Defense Minister (1969–78), removed from Succession.
  7. Salman (born 31 December 1935); King (2015–present)
  8. Ahmed (born 1942); Deputy Minister of the Interior (1975–2012) and briefly as Minister of the Interior in 2012, removed from Succession.
  9. Jawahir[citation needed]
  10. Latifa
  11. Al Jawhara
  12. Moudhi (died young)[citation needed]
  13. Felwa (died young)[citation needed]

Shahida

Shahida (died 1938) was an Armenian woman who was reportedly the favourite wife of King Abdulaziz.[30][31] Ibn Saud and Shahida had at least three children.

  1. Mansour (1921 – 2 May 1951); Minister of Defense, died from alcohol intoxication while partying.
  2. Misha'al (1926 – 3 May 2017); Minister of Defense, removed from Succession
  3. Qumash (1927 – September 2011)[32]
  4. Mutaib (born 1931); Minister of Municipal and Rural Affairs (1980 to 2009), removed from Succession.

Fahda bint Asi bin Shuraim Al Shammari

  1. Abdullah (1 August 1924 – 23 January 2015); King (2005–2015)
  2. Nuf[citation needed]
  3. Seeta (c. 1930 – 13 April 2011); initiated the Princesses' Council

Bazza (II)

Bazza died in 1940 and was Syrian or Moroccan.[33][13][34]

  1. Bandar (born 1923)
  2. Fawwaz (1934–2008)
  3. Mishari[citation needed]

Haya bint Sa'ad Al Sudairi

Second wife from that clan.[35] Her lifespan was (1913 – 18 April 2003).[citation needed]

  1. Badr (I) (1931–1932)[citation needed]
  2. Badr (II) (1933 – 1 April 2013)
  3. Huzza (1951 – July 2000)
  4. Abdul Ilah (born 1939)
  5. Abdul Majeed (1943–2007)
  6. Nura (born 1930)[citation needed]
  7. Mishail[citation needed]
  8. Zubri[citation needed]

Bushra

Name Lifespan Notes
Mishari (1932 – 23 May 2000)[36]

Munaiyir

Munaiyir was an Armenian woman. Her lifespan was (c. 1909 – December 1991).[citation needed]

  1. Talal (I) (1924–1927)[citation needed]
  2. Talal (II) (born 1931)
  3. Nawwaf (16 August 1932 – 29 September 2015)
  4. Madawi[36]

Mudhi

  1. Sultana (c. 1928 – 7 July 2008)[37]
  2. Haya (c. 1929 – 2 November 2009)[38]
  3. Majid (II) (9 October 1938 – 12 April 2003)
  4. Sattam (21 January 1941 – 12 February 2013)

Nouf bint Al Shalan

Nouf was the daughter of Nawaaf. She married in November 1935.

  1. Thamir (1937 – 27 June 1959)[citation needed]
  2. Mamdouh (born 1941)
  3. Mashhur (born 1942)

Saida al Yamaniyah

Saida was a Yemeni woman, hence her title al Yamaniyah.[citation needed]

  1. Hathloul (1942 – 29 September 2012)

Baraka Al Yamaniyah

  1. Muqrin (born 15 September 1945); Crown Prince (23 January 2015— 29 April 2015)

Futayma

  1. Hamoud (1947 – February 1994)[36]

Mudhi bint Abdullah Almandeel Al Khalidi

Mudhi was from Bani Khalid[citation needed]

  1. Shaikha (born 1922)[citation needed]

Aliyah Fakeer

  1. Majid (I) (1939–1940)[citation needed]
  2. Abdul Saleem (1941–1942)[citation needed]
  3. Jiluwi (I) (1942–1944)[citation needed]
  4. Jiluwi (II) (1952–1952); the youngest son of Ibn Saud but died as an infant.[citation needed]

Khadra

No known offspring.[39]

Grandchildren

Due to the Islamic traditions of polygyny and easy divorce (on the male side), King Abdul Aziz has approximately a thousand grandchildren.[40] The following is a select list of notable grandsons in the male line. They will be in the line of Succession to the Saudi Arabian throne.

Patrilineal grandsons

Deceased

Granddaughters

Great-grandchildren

Patrilineal great-grandsons of Ibn Saud

Great-granddaughters

Non-patrilineal descendants of Ibn Saud

References

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