Degree of truth

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In standard mathematics, propositions can typically be considered unambiguously true or false. For instance, the proposition zero belongs to the set { 1 } is regarded as simply false; while the proposition one belongs to the set { 1 } is regarded as simply true. However, some mathematicians, computer scientists, and philosophers have been attracted to the idea that a proposition might be more or less true, rather than wholly true or wholly false. Consider My coffee is hot.

In mathematics, this idea can be developed in terms of fuzzy logic. In computer science, it has found application in artificial intelligence. In philosophy, the idea has proved particularly appealing in the case of vagueness. Degrees of truth is an important concept in law.

See also

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Bibliography

  • Zadeh, L.A. (1965). "Fuzzy sets". Information and Control. 8 (3): 338–353. doi:10.1016/S0019-9958(65)90241-X. ISSN 0019-9958.


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