Deep Wound

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Deep Wound
Deepwound2004.jpg
Deep Wound performing in Northampton, Massachusetts in April 2004
Background information
Origin Westfield, Massachusetts, U.S.
Genres Hardcore punk, grindcore
Years active 1982-1984, 2004, 2013
Labels Damaged Goods, Radiobeat
Associated acts Dinosaur Jr., Stugots, Sebadoh, The Folk Implosion, Frenchy and the Punk
Past members J Mascis
Lou Barlow
Scott Helland
Charlie Nakajima

Deep Wound was an American hardcore punk band formed in 1982 in Westfield, Massachusetts.[1] They released one self-titled 7" and contributed two songs to the compilation LP, Bands That Could Be God,[2] both of which are sought after by fans and record collectors alike. The band is considered as an influencer for the Massachusetts hardcore scene as well as the development of grindcore.[3]

History

In the early 1980s, J Mascis and Deep Wound vocalist Charlie Nakajima lived in Amherst, MA, and attended the same high school. In 1982, guitarist Lou Barlow met Scott Helland at the Oi! singles bin in a local record shop. Soon after, Scott posted a flier looking for musicians who were influenced by bands such as Anti-Pasti and Discharge. Mascis responded to the ad and was driven by his father to Lou Barlow's place in Westfield, MA for an audition. Although the band already had a singer, Mascis convinced them to replace him with Charlie, and Deep Wound's line-up was complete. The band quickly recorded a demo cassette and began to play shows in Boston with local hardcore bands such as SSD, The F.U.'s, Jerry's Kids, etc. and often opened for hardcore punk bands playing in Western MA. Shortly thereafter, the band recorded its self-titled EP, released on Radiobeat Records, and contributed two tracks to Gerard Cosloy's Bands That Could Be God compilation. Studio recordings of a later session with Gerard singing have apparently been lost. As the band progressed, they began playing faster and faster, eventually developing a blur-type sound that could verge on experimental noise.

Deep Wound disbanded in 1984 with J Mascis and Lou Barlow going on to form Dinosaur Jr. Barlow later left Dinosaur Jr. and formed Sebadoh, Sentridoh, and Folk Implosion. Scott Helland formed the Outpatients,[4] played bass in Darkside NYC and is now the guitarist for Frenchy and the Punk. Charlie Nakajima later formed Gobblehoof. J Mascis can often be seen sporting a 'Deep Wound' sweater (knitted by his mother) in Dinosaur Jr. photographs.

In April 2004, Sonic Youth played a show at John Green Hall on the Smith College campus in Northampton MA with J Mascis and Sebadoh as the opening acts and the anticipation was that the two would reunite for a few Dinosaur Jr. songs. Unexpectedly though, after J Mascis' set, he returned to the stage on drums and Charlie Nakajima came out to address the crowd. Lou Barlow and Scott Helland soon appeared and the stunned audience witnessed a one song Deep Wound reunion.

In 2005, British record label Damaged Goods released a Discography LP compiling the 1982 demo, self-titled 7” and the tracks from Bands That Could Be God.

In June 2013 Helland joined the members of Dinosaur Jr. to perform the song "Training Ground" at the Governor's Ball in New York City.[5]

Lineup

Discography

EPs

  • Demo Cassette (1983, Self-released)
No. Title Length
1. "I Saw It"  
2. "Sick"  
3. "Graven Image"  
4. "Lou's Anxiety Song"  
5. "Video Prick"  
6. "In My Room"  
7. "Don't Need"  
8. "Deep Wound"  
9. "Dead Babies"  
10. "You're False"  
11. "Sisters"  
12. "Patriots"  
13. "Time To Stand"  
14. "Adults In The Basement"  
  • Deep Wound 7" EP (1983, Radiobeat)
No. Title Length
1. "I Saw It" 1:09
2. "Sisters" 0:38
3. "In My Room" 1:08
4. "7 Don't Need" 0:58
5. "Lou's Anxiety Song" 0:57
6. "Video Prick" 1:33
7. "Sick of Fun" 0:48
8. "Deep Wound" 1:10
9. "Dead Babies" 1:13
Total length: 9:32

Compilation albums

No. Title Length
1. "I Saw It (from 'Deep Wound' EP)" 1:09
2. "Sisters (from 'Deep Wound' EP)" 0:38
3. "In My Room (from 'Deep Wound' EP)" 1:08
4. "7 Don't Need (from 'Deep Wound' EP)" 0:58
5. "Lou's Anxiety Song (from 'Deep Wound' EP)" 0:57
6. "Video Prick (from 'Deep Wound' EP)" 1:33
7. "Sick of Fun (from 'Deep Wound' EP)" 0:48
8. "Deep Wound (from 'Deep Wound' EP)" 1:10
9. "Dead Babies (from 'Deep Wound' EP)" 1:13
10. "You're False" 0:39
11. "Time to Stand" 1:40
12. "Pressure" 1:12
13. "Training Ground" 1:14
14. "Deep Wound" 1:32
15. "You're False" 0:55
16. "You're Head Is In Your Crotch" 0:27
17. "Psyched to Die" 2:40
18. "Sister" 1:05
19. "Patriots" 0:32
20. "Never Let You In" 0:41
21. "Adult" 0:42
22. "Don't Need" 1:18
23. "Video Prick" 2:11
24. "Let's Go to the Mall" 7:16
Total length: 33:37
  • Almost Complete CD (2006, Baked Goods)
No. Title Length
1. "I Saw It (from 'Deep Wound' EP)" 1:09
2. "Sisters (from 'Deep Wound' EP)" 0:38
3. "In My Room (from 'Deep Wound' EP)" 1:08
4. "7 Don't Need (from 'Deep Wound' EP)" 0:58
5. "Lou's Anxiety Song (from 'Deep Wound' EP)" 0:57
6. "Video Prick (from 'Deep Wound' EP)" 1:33
7. "Sick of Fun (from 'Deep Wound' EP)" 0:48
8. "Deep Wound (from 'Deep Wound' EP)" 1:10
9. "Dead Babies (from 'Deep Wound' EP)" 1:13
10. "You're False" 0:39
11. "Time to Stand" 1:40
12. "Pressure" 1:12
13. "Training Ground" 1:14
14. "Deep Wound" 1:32
15. "You're False" 0:55
16. "You're Head Is In Your Crotch" 0:27
17. "Psyched to Die" 2:40
18. "Sister" 1:05
19. "Patriots" 0:32
20. "Never Let You In" 0:41
21. "Adult" 0:42
22. "Don't Need" 1:18
23. "Video Prick" 2:11
24. "Let's Go to the Mall" 7:16
25. "Training Ground (Practice)" 1:16
26. "Patriots (Practice)" 0:51
27. "You're False (Practice)" 1:04
Total length: 36:48

Compilation appearances

  • Bands That Could Be God (1984, Conflict/Radiobeat) - "Time to Stand", "You're False"

See also

References

  1. ^ Harris, Craig. "Deep Wound Biography". allmusic.com. Allmusic. Retrieved 2017-05-05. 
  2. ^ Earles, Andrew (2014). Gimme Indie Rock: 500 Essential American Underground Rock Albums 1981-1996 (First ed.). 400 First Avenue North, Suite 400, Minneapolis, MN: Voyager Press. p. 145. ISBN 978-0-7603-4648-8. Retrieved May 5, 2017. 
  3. ^ Bonazelli (2017-07-10), Andrew. "Is Dinosaur Jr's J Mascis The Father Of Grindcore?". decibelmagazine.com. Decibel Magazine. Retrieved 2017-05-05. 
  4. ^ Blush, Steven (October 19, 2010). American Hardcore (Second ed.). Feral House. 
  5. ^ "Governors Ball Day 1 Recap: Dinosaur Jr., Best Coast Rock Before Storm Forces Cancellation". Diffuser.fm. June 8, 2013. Retrieved 2014-03-03. 

External links

  • Scott Helland official site
  • Damaged Goods Records
  • Deep Wound at Kill From the Heart
  • Bands That Could Be God Comp at Kill From the Heart
  • Deep Wound at FLEX!
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