December 1944

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1944
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The following events occurred in December 1944:

December 1, 1944 (Friday)

December 2, 1944 (Saturday)

December 3, 1944 (Sunday)

  • A series of clashes in Athens known as the Dekemvriana ("December events") began when British troops and Greek police opened fire on a massive leftist demonstration, killing 28 and wounding 100.[5]
  • The Soviet 2nd Ukrainian Front captured the Hungarian city of Miskolc.[6]
  • The American destroyer USS Cooper was torpedoed and sunk in Ormoc Bay by the Japanese destroyer Take.
  • The British Home Guard formally stood down.

December 4, 1944 (Monday)

December 5, 1944 (Tuesday)

December 6, 1944 (Wednesday)

  • 409 Japanese paratroopers were landed at Leyte in a coordinated offensive with Japanese infantry attacking from the west.[9]
  • The Germans began removing all the electric trains in the Netherlands along with their wiring and sending them to Germany to replace the train system in places where it had been destroyed by Allied bombing.[7]
  • German submarine U-297 was depth charged and sunk west of Yesnaby by a Short Sunderland patrol bomber of No. 201 Squadron RAF.
  • The British frigate Bullen was torpedoed and sunk off Cape Wrath, Scotland by German submarine U-775.
  • British planes began strafing communists in Athens.[5]
  • The Heinkel He 162 had its first flight.
  • Born: Ron Kenoly, Christian musician and worship leader, in Coffeyville, Kansas; Jonathan King, musician, record producer and entrepreneur, in London, England

December 7, 1944 (Thursday)

December 8, 1944 (Friday)

December 9, 1944 (Saturday)

December 10, 1944 (Sunday)

December 11, 1944 (Monday)

December 12, 1944 (Tuesday)

December 13, 1944 (Wednesday)

December 14, 1944 (Thursday)

  • The British escort destroyer Aldenham was sunk by a naval mine in the Adriatic Sea off Pag. Aldenham was the last Royal Navy destroyer lost in World War II.
  • The Palawan massacre occurred in the Philippines when 150 Allied prisoners of war were murdered by the Japanese during an air raid.
  • At least 186 Japanese aircraft were deployed for an all-out attack on the American invasion force sailing toward Mindoro. Most of them failed to locate the American convoys and at least 46 were shot down.[19]
  • The U.S. military created the five-star rank.[20]
  • A total prohibition on citizen use of electricity was introduced to North and South Holland.[7]
  • The sports film National Velvet starring Mickey Rooney, Donald Crisp and Elizabeth Taylor was released.

December 15, 1944 (Friday)

December 16, 1944 (Saturday)

December 17, 1944 (Sunday)

December 18, 1944 (Monday)

December 19, 1944 (Tuesday)

  • German forces captured 9,000 surrounded U.S. troops in the Schnee Eifel region on the Belgian-German border and pushed the Americans back off German soil.[5][10]
  • Japanese aircraft carrier Unryū was torpedoed and sunk in the East China Sea by the American submarine Redfish.
  • German submarine U-737 sank in a collision with depot ship MRS 25 in Vestfjorden, Norway.
  • Chester Nimitz was made a five-star admiral in the U.S. Navy.[20]
  • Born: Tim Reid, actor, comedian and film director, in Norfolk, Virginia

December 20, 1944 (Wednesday)

December 21, 1944 (Thursday)

December 22, 1944 (Friday)

December 23, 1944 (Saturday)

December 24, 1944 (Sunday)

December 25, 1944 (Monday)

December 26, 1944 (Tuesday)

December 27, 1944 (Wednesday)

December 28, 1944 (Thursday)

  • American troops began gaining ground in their counteroffensive during the Battle of the Bulge. Adolf Hitler disregarded the advice of his generals and ordered renewed offensives in the Alsace and Ardennes regions.[10]
  • At least 20 Allied soldiers perished when the Infantry Landing Ship Empire Javelin sank in the English Channel with 1,483 troops aboard. It is unknown whether she struck a naval mine or was torpedoed by the German submarine U-322 which was active in the area that day.
  • German submarine U-735 was bombed and sunk by British aircraft off Horten, Norway.
  • Hockey star Maurice Richard of the Montreal Canadiens showed up exhausted to the Montreal Forum after spending the day helping his family move from one apartment to another. That night he recorded eight points (five goals and three assists) during a 9–2 win over the Detroit Red Wings, a new NHL record for points by one player in a single game that stood until 1976.[32]
  • The stage musical On the Town with music by Leonard Bernstein and book and lyrics by Betty Comden and Adolph Green premiered on Broadway at the Adelphi Theatre.
  • Born: Jane Lapotaire, actress, in Ipswich, Suffolk, England; Kary Mullis, biochemist and Nobel laureate, in Lenoir, North Carolina

December 29, 1944 (Friday)

December 30, 1944 (Saturday)

December 31, 1944 (Sunday)

References

  1. ^ "War Diary for Friday, 1 December 1944". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  2. ^ "Horvath Awarded Heisman Trophy". Logan Daily News. Logan, Ohio: p. 5. December 2, 1944. 
  3. ^ "War Diary for Saturday, 2 December 1944". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  4. ^ Tallent, Aaron (December 10, 2015). "The Army-Navy Game During World War II". Athlon Sports & Life. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f "1944". MusicAndHistory. Retrieved March 1, 2016. [permanent dead link]
  6. ^ "War Diary for Sunday, 3 December 1944". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  7. ^ a b c Dando-Collins, Stephen (2015). Operation Chowhound: The Most Risky, Most Glorious US Bomber Mission of WWII. New York: St. Martin's Press. pp. 47–48. ISBN 978-1-137-27963-7. 
  8. ^ "War Diary for Tuesday, 5 December 1944". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  9. ^ a b Taylan, Justin (August 7, 2015). "Japanese Paratrooper Attack on Leyte December 7, 1944". PacificWrecks.com. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  10. ^ a b c d "1944". World War II Database. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  11. ^ a b c Mercer, Derrik, ed. (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. p. 614. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3. 
  12. ^ "Chronology 1944". indiana.edu. 2002. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  13. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Literature 1944". Nobelprize.org. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  14. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physics 1943". NobelPrize.org. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  15. ^ Marren, Joe. "1944 Baseball Winter Meetings: A new era without Judge Landis". Society for American Baseball Research. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  16. ^ "War Diary for Monday, 11 December 1944". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  17. ^ "1944: Key Dates". United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  18. ^ "World War II: Field Marshal Sir Harold Alexander". About.com. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  19. ^ a b "Mindoro". The Pacific War Online Encyclopedia. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  20. ^ a b c d e f g h "Five-Star Officers - Generals and Admirals". Arlington National Cemetery. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  21. ^ "War Diary for Friday, 15 December 1944". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  22. ^ Quartermaine, Luisa (2000). Mussolini's Last Republic: Propaganda and Politics in the Italian Social Republic 1943–45. Exeter: Elm Bank Publications. p. 128. ISBN 978-1-902454-08-5. 
  23. ^ Chen, C. Peter. "Gothic Line Offensive". World War II Database. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  24. ^ Davidson, Edward; Manning, Dale (1999). Chronology of World War Two. London: Cassell & Co. p. 226. ISBN 0-304-35309-4. 
  25. ^ a b "Conflict Timeline, December 14-23 1944". OnWar.com. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  26. ^ McAuliffe, Kenneth J., Jr. (December 12, 2012). "The story of the NUTS! Reply". Army.mil. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  27. ^ Roman, Eric (2003). Austria-Hungary & the Successor States: A Reference Guide from the Renaissance to the Present. Facts On File, Inc. p. 613. ISBN 978-0-8160-7469-3. 
  28. ^ "War Diary for Saturday, 23 December 1944". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  29. ^ "Conflict Timeline, December 21 1944-Jan 2 1945". OnWar.com. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  30. ^ "War Diary for Monday, 25 December 1944". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  31. ^ Bloom, Harold (2007). The Glass Menagerie. Infobase Publishing. p. 14. ISBN 978-1-4381-1451-4. 
  32. ^ "Greatest Moments". Our History: The Historical Website of the Montreal Canadiens. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  33. ^ "War Diary for Saturday, 30 December 1944". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  34. ^ Gowran, Clay (December 31, 1944). "King Appoints Archbishop as Greek Regent". Chicago Daily Tribune. Chicago: p. 1. 
  35. ^ Sowa, Peter (2012). Finding Life. Abbott Press. p. 478. ISBN 978-1-4582-0197-3. 
  36. ^ "December 31, 1944: Hungary Declared War on Germany". History. A&E Networks. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  37. ^ "Oslo Tragedy as RAF Mosquitos Attack Gestapo HQ". World War II Today. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  38. ^ "1944 Chronology of Aviation History". Skytamer.com. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
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