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David Joyce (politician)

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Dave Joyce
David Joyce.jpg
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Ohio's 14th district
Assumed office
January 3, 2013
Preceded by Steve LaTourette
39th Prosecutor of Geauga County
In office
January 5, 1988 – January 3, 2013
Preceded by Craig Albert
Succeeded by Jim Flaiz
Personal details
Born David Patrick Joyce
(1957-03-17) March 17, 1957 (age 61)
Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.
Political party Republican
Spouse(s)
Kelly Joyce (m. 1990)
Education University of Dayton (BS, JD)
Website House website

David Patrick Joyce (born March 17, 1957) is an American politician who has been the United States Representative for Ohio's 14th congressional district since 2013.[1] An attorney, Joyce was previously the Prosecutor of Geauga County, Ohio. He is a member of the Republican Party.

Early life and education

Dave Joyce was born in Cleveland, Ohio, to a devout Irish Catholic family.[citation needed] His father was a coal salesman. In high school, he played football, and considered joining the priesthood.[citation needed] In 1975, Joyce enrolled at the University of Dayton, a Catholic university in Dayton, Ohio, from which he received a Bachelor of Science degree in 1979, and later a Juris Doctor.[2]

Prosecutor of Geauga County

In 1989, Joyce worked with Lake County Prosecutor Steven C. LaTourette to charge serial murderer and Cult leader Jeffrey Lundgren with the Kirtland cult killings.[3] In 2005, Joyce earned the Family Friendly Workplace Award from the Ohio State Women’s Bar Association.[citation needed]

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

2012

In July 2012, U.S. Congressman Steve LaTourette of Ohio's 14th congressional district announced that he would be retiring in 2012, rather than seek re-election. Joyce was appointed as the replacement nominee on the Republican ticket.[4][5]

Joyce ran in the November general election against perennial Democratic Party candidate Dale Virgil Blanchard, Libertarian David Macko and Green Party candidate Elaine Mastromatteo. Joyce won the election with 54% of the vote.[6]

2014

In February 2013, Roll Call reported that Steve Israel, head of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, had names Joyce's seat as one of the party's top four targets in 2014. The House Majority PAC made Joyce one of its top targets to oust in the 2014 elections.[7]

In 2014, according to one news source, Joyce "survived a grueling primary against a tea party-backed candidate," and then faced "an equally tough challenge from Michael Wager."[8]

David Joyce won 63.3% of the vote, with Wager receiving 33% and independent David Macko winning 3.7%.[9]

2016

Joyce defeated Wager again, 62.6% to 37.4%.[10]

2018

In April 2017, Betsy Rader, a Democrat, announced that she would be running against Joyce in 2018. Rader is a lawyer who represents victims of employment discrimination. Rader said that she supported "much" of the Affordable Care Act, but admitted that health care was "an issue I've got to study more." Rader criticized Joyce for opposing an increase in the minimum wage and for wanting to withdraw federal funding for Planned Parenthood.[11]

In October 2017, Pastor Darrell Scott, CEO of President Trump's National Diversity Coalition, announced he was thinking of running against Joyce in 2018 for the GOP Congressional nomination. He said that the district needed someone who stood more firmly with the President. Charlie Frye, Chairman of the Ashtabula Republican Party, supported Scott, saying he liked Joyce but did not like the way he votes.[12]

Committee assignments

Tenure

Asked about his legislative priorities in March 2016, Joyce cited terrorist threats, job growth, government spending, the national debt, environmental protection of the Great Lakes, and health care.[18]

The Lugar Center and the McCourt School of Public Policy ranked Joyce as the 29th most bipartisan member of the U.S. House of Representatives during the 114th United States Congress and the most bipartisan member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Ohio.[19]

In July 2017, Joyce said that political discourse in the U.S. had reached a "vitriolic" level. "I do know there's a level of frustration out there," he said. "But we need to work together. [President Donald Trump] has gotten into this tug-of-war with the national media. Now we're six months into his presidency ... and infrastructure improvements, tax changes and healthcare law are not getting covered. They are dealing with the Tweet du Jour ... and [Trump's tweets] certainly don't help."[20]

Joyce is a member of the Republican Main Street Partnership[21] and the United States Congressional International Conservation Caucus.[22]

Health care

In July 2017, Joyce expressed the view that the only viable route to a consensus on health care was to take a bipartisan approach. While admitting that Obamacare was "going to fail" he said that the drafting of the GOP's then-current Senate health-care bill was "even worse than how the Affordable Care Act evolved" and that the GOP's House health-care bill "was too partisan" and that there "is nothing in this Senate bill, that is going to bring down the cost of healthcare."[23]

Jobs

In an August 2013 speech, Joyce said that part of the problem with the jobs issue was that there are "3 million jobs every month in this country that go unfilled." He noted that the Cleveland Plain Dealer had fact-checked this number and had "actually came up with a higher number than 3 million." The trouble, he explained, is that employers "can't find people to come to work sober, daily, drug-free and want to learn the necessary skills going forward to be able to do those jobs."[24]

Military and intelligence

In March 2016, Joyce emphasized his support for the military and intelligence communities. He noted his votes for the strengthening of the Visa Waiver Program in order to "ensure terrorists with Western passports don't enter our country," for restrictions on transferring Guantanamo detainees, and for enhancements in cybersecurity infrastructure. He said, in summary, that he was "committed to giving our soldiers and our intelligence community all of the resources they need to do the job."[25]

Immigration and terrorism

Also in March 2016, Joyce said that he had co-sponsored "several bills that ensured refugees underwent stricter scrutiny in order to prevent a Paris-style attack from happening in the United States."[26]

Transportation

In 2014, Joyce introduced the Safe Streets Act with Congresswoman Doris Matsui. The bill would nationalize transportation "design elements" so that streets would be designed with the safety of drivers, pedestrians, and bicyclists in mind.[27]

Personal life

Dave married Kelly in 1990. They live in Russell Township with their three children: Trenton, KK, and Bridey. He is a member of the National District Attorney Association and the Ohio Prosecuting Attorney Association. He is also Director of the Geauga Bluecoats Inc.[28]

Electoral history

Election results[29]
Year Office Election Subject Party Votes % Opponent Party Votes % Opponent Party Votes % Opponent Party Votes %
2012 U.S. House of Representatives General Dave Joyce Republican 183,660 54% Dale V. Blanchard Democratic 131,638 39% Elaine Mastromatteo Green 13,038 4% David Macko Libertarian 11,536 3% *

*Write-in candidates Aaron Zurbrugg received 6 votes (<1%), Erick Robinson received 0 votes, and Steven Winfield received 0 votes.

Election results[30]
Year Office Election Subject Party Votes % Opponent Party Votes % Opponent Party Votes %
2014 U.S. House of Representatives General Dave Joyce Republican 135,736 63% Michael Wager Democratic 70,856 33% David Macko Libertarian 7,988 4% *

*

References

  1. ^ David Joyce, R (Ohio-14) : Roll Call
  2. ^ "Ohio, 14th House District". National Journal. Atlantic Media Company. Retrieved 1 July 2014. 
  3. ^ Northeast Ohio GOP leaders choose David Joyce to replace outgoing Rep. Steve LaTourette on ballot (updated) | cleveland.com
  4. ^ Sherman, Jake (2012-07-30). "Steve LaTourette blames polarizing climate for departure". Politico. Retrieved 11 July 2014. 
  5. ^ Gomez, Henry (10 August 2012). "Northeast Ohio GOP leaders choose David Joyce to replace outgoing Rep. Steve LaTourette on ballot". Cleveland.com. Retrieved 11 July 2014. 
  6. ^ "2012 Ohio House Results". Politico. Retrieved 11 July 2014. 
  7. ^ Terkel, Amanda; Rep. Dave Joyce On Unfilled Jobs: Businesses Can’t Find Enough ‘Sober,’ ‘Drug-Free’ Workers; Huffington Post; August 24, 2013; https://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/23/dave-joyce-workers-drug-free_n_3804552.html
  8. ^ Warsmith, Stephanie; U.S. Rep. David Joyce faces another serious challenge as Democrat Michael Wager seeks 14th District seat in pricey race; Acron Beacon Journal; October 22, 2014; https://www.ohio.com/akron/news/politics/u-s-rep-david-joyce-faces-another-serious-challenge-as-democrat-michael-wager-seeks-14th-district-seat-in-pricey-race
  9. ^ Ohio Election Results; New york Times; https://www.nytimes.com/elections/2014/ohio-elections
  10. ^ Ohio U.S. House 14th District Results: David Joyce Wins; New York Times; https://www.nytimes.com/elections/results/ohio-house-district-14-joyce-wager
  11. ^ Peltzer; Jeremy; Democrat Betsy Rader will seek to challenge U.S. Rep. Dave Joyce; Cleveland.com; April 19, 2017; http://www.cleveland.com/politics/index.ssf/2017/04/democrat_betsy_rader_to_challe.html
  12. ^ Wollet, Brian; Trump Diversity Director Pastor Darrell Scott Considering Run For Congress Against Dave Joyce; Big League Politics; October 21, 2017; https://bigleaguepolitics.com/trump-diversity-director-pastor-darrell-scott-considering-run-congress-dave-joyce/
  13. ^ "Congressman David Joyce : Committees & Caucuses". joyce.house.gov. Retrieved 2018-07-31. 
  14. ^ "Interior Subcommittee Members | Committee on Appropriations, U.S. House of Representatives". appropriations.house.gov. Retrieved 2018-08-01. 
  15. ^ "Energy and Water Development, and Related Agencies | Committee on Appropriations, U.S. House of Representatives". appropriations.house.gov. Retrieved 2018-08-01. 
  16. ^ "Transportation Subcommittee Members | Committee on Appropriations, U.S. House of Representatives". appropriations.house.gov. Retrieved 2018-08-01. 
  17. ^ "Member List". Republican Study Committee. Retrieved 21 December 2017. 
  18. ^ David Joyce, candidate for U.S. Representative Ohio 14th District seat, March 2016 primary election;The News Herald; http://www.news-herald.com/government-and-politics/20160308/david-joyce-candidate-for-us-representative-ohio-14th-district-seat-march-2016-primary-election
  19. ^ The Lugar Center - McCourt School Bipartisan Index (PDF), The Lugar Center, March 7, 2016, retrieved April 30, 2017 
  20. ^ Schunk, Andrew; Congressman Dave Joyce talks health care, discord over discourse; MyTown NEO; July 6, 2017; http://www.mytownneo.com/news/20170706/congressman-dave-joyce-talks-health-care-discord-over-discourse
  21. ^ "Members". Republican Mains Street Partnership. Retrieved 4 October 2017. 
  22. ^ "Our Members". U.S. House of Representatives International Conservation Caucus. Retrieved 2 August 2018. 
  23. ^ Schunk, Andrew; Congressman Dave Joyce talks health care, discord over discourse; MyTown NEO; July 6, 2017; http://www.mytownneo.com/news/20170706/congressman-dave-joyce-talks-health-care-discord-over-discourse
  24. ^ Terkel, Amanda; Rep. Dave Joyce On Unfilled Jobs: Businesses Can’t Find Enough ‘Sober,’ ‘Drug-Free’ Workers; Huffington Post; August 24, 2013; https://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/23/dave-joyce-workers-drug-free_n_3804552.html
  25. ^ David Joyce, candidate for U.S. Representative Ohio 14th District seat, March 2016 primary election;The News Herald; March 8, 2016; http://www.news-herald.com/government-and-politics/20160308/david-joyce-candidate-for-us-representative-ohio-14th-district-seat-march-2016-primary-election
  26. ^ David Joyce, candidate for U.S. Representative Ohio 14th District seat, March 2016 primary election;The News Herald; March 8, 2016; http://www.news-herald.com/government-and-politics/20160308/david-joyce-candidate-for-us-representative-ohio-14th-district-seat-march-2016-primary-election
  27. ^ Martin, Aaron. "Bipartisan measure would improve road safety". Ripon Advance. February 10, 2014. (Retrieved 02-11-14).
  28. ^ Geauga County Prosecutor - About the Prosecutor
  29. ^ "Election Results". Ohio Secretary of State. Retrieved 2014-03-01. 
  30. ^ "Election Results". Ohio Secretary of State. Retrieved 2015-01-26. 

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Steve LaTourette
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Ohio's 14th congressional district

January 3, 2013 – present
Incumbent
Current U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by
Hakeem Jeffries
D-New York
United States Representatives by seniority
270th
Succeeded by
Joseph P. Kennedy III
D-Massachusetts
Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=David_Joyce_(politician)&oldid=858954905"
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