Daniel Raymond Burt

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Daniel Raymond Burt February 29, 1804 – January 7, 1884) was an American legislator and businessman.

Born in Florida, New York, in Montgomery County, New York,[1] he moved to Ontario in 1826 and then to Tecumseh, Michigan in 1830.[1] He married Lydia Ashley (1805–1864) in 1831.[1] Burt then moved to Wisconsin Territory settling in the town of Waterloo, in Grant County, Wisconsin in 1835,[1] where he developed roads, gristmills, and sawmills. The unincorporated community of Burton, Wisconsin, in the town of Waterloo, was platted and named for him. He served in the Wisconsin Territorial Legislature from 1840 to 1842 and 1847 to 1848 as a Whig.[2] Burt then moved to Dunleith, Illinois (now East Dubuque, Illinois), in 1856,[1] where he started the Burt Machine Company, which produced agricultural machinery.[3] He married his second wife, Mary J. Ennor, in 1866.[1] Burt died on January 7, 1884 in Wenona, Illinois and was buried in East Dubuque, Illinois.[4]

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f "Passed Away". Freeport Journal-Standard. January 10, 1884. p. 4. Retrieved July 24, 2017 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  2. ^ "Daniel R. Burt and Noah H. Virgin". Wisconsin Democrat. August 21, 1847. p. 2. Retrieved July 25, 2017 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  3. ^ The Convention of 1846, Milo Milton Quaife, Wisconsin Historical Society, Biographical Sketch of Dan Raymond Burt, p. 764.
  4. ^ "Death of Daniel R. Burt". The Inter Ocean. January 9, 1884. p. 9. Retrieved July 23, 2017 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read

External links


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