DHS National Protection and Programs Directorate

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DHS National Protection and Programs Directorate
Seal of the United States Department of Homeland Security.svg
Agency overview
Formed 2007
Jurisdiction United States
Headquarters Rosslyn, Arlington, VA
Employees 2,787 (2012)
Annual budget $2.5 billion (2012)
Agency executive
Parent agency Department of Homeland Security
Website DHS National Protection and Programs Directorate

The National Protection and Programs Directorate (NPPD) is a component within the United States Department of Homeland Security.[2] NPPD's goal is to advance the Department's national security mission by reducing and eliminating threats to U.S. critical physical and cyber infrastructure.

The NPPD is led by the Under Secretary of Homeland Security for National Protection and Programs, who is appointed by the President of the United States with confirmation by the United States Senate.

Overview

NPPD is the lead component of the United States Department of Homeland Security in the protection of the Nation’s physical and cyber critical infrastructure and key resources from terrorist attacks, natural disasters, and other catastrophic incidents. NPPD collaborates and shares information with Federal, State, local, tribal, international, and private-sector partners.

NPPD has three major program activities:

  • Cyber Security and Communications – Collaborates with public, private, and international partners to ensure the security and continuity of the Nation’s cyber and communications infrastructures in the event of terrorist attacks, natural disasters, and catastrophic incidents. Additionally, Cyber Security and Communications protects and strengthens the reliability, survivability, and interoperability of the Nation’s communications capabilities, including those utilized during emergencies, at the Federal, State, local, and tribal levels. Responsible for overseeing the National Cyber Security Division.
  • Infrastructure Protection – Leads coordinated efforts for reducing risk to the Nation’s physical critical infrastructure and key resources from terrorist attacks, natural disasters, and other catastrophic incidents by integrating and disseminating critical infrastructure and key resources threat, consequence, and vulnerability information; developing risk mitigation strategies; and overseeing the developing and implementation of the National Infrastructure Protection Plan (NIPP). These efforts help to ensure that essential Government missions, public services, and economic functions are maintained. IP also ensures that critical infrastructure and key resources elements are not exploited for use as weapons of mass destruction against people or institutions through regulatory initiatives such as its Ammonium Nitrate and Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards (CFATS) programs.
  • Federal Protective Service – Leads the Department’s comprehensive security and law enforcement services for mitigating risk to more than 9,000 Federal facilities and their 1.1 million occupants nationwide. Operational activities include law enforcement response; risk assessments of Federal facilities to determine, recommend, and install appropriate risk mitigation measures; and oversight of between 12,000 and 15,000 armed contract protective security officers, depending on customer requirements. Further, personnel conduct criminal investigations, provide regular security awareness training to stakeholders, and provide support to major events.
  • Office of Biometric Identity Management - formerly the United States Visitor and Immigrant Status Indicator Technology Program - supports the Department of Homeland Security's responsibility to protect the nation by providing biometric identification services that help federal, state, and local government decision makers accurately identify the people they encounter and determine whether those people pose a risk to the United States. US-VISIT supplies the technology for collecting and storing biometric data, provides analysis, updates its watchlist, and ensures the integrity of the data.

Management

Senior officials within the NPPD include:

  • Under Secretary of Homeland Security for National Protection and Programs
    • Deputy Under Secretary of Homeland Security for Cyber Security
      • Assistant Secretary of Homeland Security for Cyber Security and Communications
        • Office of Cyber Security and Communications
          • Office of Emergency Communications
          • National Cyber Security and Communications Integration Center
          • Stakeholder Engagement and Cyber Infrastructure Resilience
          • Federal Network Resilience
          • Network Security Deployment
          • Sector Specific Agency Executive Management Office
            • Communications Branch
            • Information Technology Branch
      • Office of Cyber Security Coordination
    • Deputy Under Secretary of Homeland Security for National Protection and Programs
      • Assistant Secretary of Homeland Security for Infrastructure Protection
        • Office of Infrastructure Protection
          • Infrastructure Security Compliance Division
          • Infrastructure Information Collection Division
          • Protective Security Coordination Division
          • Sector Outreach and Programs Division
            • Chemical Branch
            • Commercial Facilities Branch
            • Dams Branch
            • Emergency Services Branch
            • Nuclear Branch
          • National Infrastructure Coordinating Center
      • Director, Federal Protective Service
      • Director, Office of Biometric Identification Management
        • Office of Biometric Identification Management (formerly US-VISIT)

Budget

DHS National Protection and Programs Budget, FY11-13 ($ in thousands) [3]
Line Item FY11 Actual FY12 Actual FY13 Request
Management and Administration 43,490 50,695 50,321
Infrastructure Protection and Information Security 838,763 888,243 1,166,633
US-VISIT 333,944 306,802 0 [4]
Federal Protective Service 1,115,000 1,285,599 1,301,824
Total Budget 2,331,197 2,531,339 2,518,778

Subcomponents

Federal Protective Service

Federal Protective Service is a federal law enforcement agency that provides integrated security and law enforcement services to federally owned and leased buildings, courthouses, facilities, properties and other assets, as well as the personnel associated with them.

Office of Cybersecurity and Communications (CS&C)

The Office of Cybersecurity and Communications has the mission of assuring the security, resiliency, and reliability of the nation’s cyber and communications infrastructure. Includes the National Cyber Security Division.

The National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center[5] coordinates responses to cyberattacks and is headquartered in Arlington, Virginia.[6]

Office of Infrastructure Protection (IP)

The Office of Infrastructure Protection leads the coordinated national effort to reduce risk to the United States' critical infrastructures and key resources (CIKR) posed by acts of terrorism. In doing so, the Department increases the nation's level of preparedness and the ability to respond and quickly recover in the event of an attack, natural disaster, or other emergency.

Office of Cyber and Infrastructure Analysis (OCIA)

Formerly the Infrastructure Analysis and Strategy Division (IASD) within the Office of Infrastructure Protection, OCIA was established in 2014. OCIA has an important role in DHS’s efforts to implement Presidential Policy Directive 21, which calls for integrated analysis of critical infrastructure, and Executive Order 13636, identifying critical infrastructure where cyber incidents could have catastrophic impacts to public health and safety, the economy, and national security.

Office of Biometric Identity Management (OBIM) – formerly US-VISIT

The Office of Biometric Identity Management (OBIM), formerly the United States Visitor and Immigrant Status Indicator Technology (US-VISIT) uses innovative biometrics-based technological solutions—digital fingerprints and photographs—to provide decision-makers with accurate information when and where they need it. According to the President's proposed Fiscal Year 2013 budget the US-VISIT program may be transferred to Customs and Border Protection and Immigration and Customs Enforcement.[7] However, through proposed 2013 Continuing Resolutions, both the House of Representatives[8] and Senate[9] rejected the President's proposal for full transfer of the program. Instead, the Senate establishes the Office of Biometric Identity Management under NPPD, with US-VISIT's mission operations moving to Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Likewise, the House proposed keeping the US-VISIT Program as-is under NPPD.

References

  1. ^ "Homeland Security (Organization)". 
  2. ^ "DHS | About the National Protection and Programs Directorate". Dhs.gov. 2011-08-26. Retrieved 2011-09-27. 
  3. ^ "Fiscal Year (FY) 2013 Budget Budget in Brief, DHS, pg 134" (PDF). Department of Homeland Security. 2012. Retrieved 2011-08-29. 
  4. ^ US-VISIT is being consolidated into CBP and ICE in FY13
  5. ^ National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center
  6. ^ "Inside DHS' Classified Cyber Coordination Headquarters". InformationWeek. 
  7. ^ Homeland Security Department IT budget has winners and losers – FCW
  8. ^ http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/BILLS-113hr933eh/pdf/BILLS-113hr933eh.pdf
  9. ^ http://www.appropriations.senate.gov/news.cfm?method=news.view&id=729722e4-2b84-4651-ae53-cad2b62e548e

External links

  • Official website
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