Corwen railway station

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Corwen
Corwen Railway Station.jpg
Station building in January 2010
Location
Place Corwen
Area Denbighshire
Operations
Original company Llangollen & Corwen Railway
Pre-grouping Great Western Railway
Post-grouping Great Western Railway
Western Region of British Railways
Platforms 2
History
1 Sept 1865 Opened
2 Nov 1964 Closed to goods [1]
14 Dec 1964 Closed to passengers
Disused railway stations in the United Kingdom
Closed railway stations in Britain
A B C D–F G H–J K–L M–O P–R S T–V W–Z
170433 at Edinburgh Waverley.JPG UK Railways portal
The main station building in 1992, showing the demolished wings and central section, about to be redeveloped as a showroom

Corwen railway station was a railway station on the Ruabon to Barmouth Line, located in the town of Corwen in Denbighshire, Wales.

Original station

The first station to open was a temporary station to the east of the town, when the line from Denbigh opened in October 1864. A permanent station was opened by the Great Western Railway in May 1865.

The station had two platforms and a signal box, and was a passing place on the single track line. Corwen was also the southern terminus of the Denbigh, Ruthin and Corwen Railway (DR&CR), which ran from Rhyl via Denbigh and Ruthin to Corwen, opening in 1864. According to the Official Handbook of Stations, the following classes of traffic were being handled at this station in 1956: G, P, F, L, H and C and there was a 1-ton 10 cwt crane.[2]

The former DR&CR route officially closed in 1963, although the line south of Ruthin was abandoned several years earlier after a landslide. Corwen station itself was scheduled to close under the Beeching Axe to passengers on Monday 18 January 1965, but it closed prematurely on Monday 14 December 1964 due to flood damage west of the station.

The main station building and site survives mainly intact today, in private use as an Ifor Williams Trailers showroom since 1990. The trackbed was infilled, both main building wings and the toilets demolished, and the central section rebuilt to accommodate a showroom.

New station (Llangollen Railway)

In 2011, the preserved Llangollen Railway began work to re-construct the 2.5 miles (4.0 km) section of permanent way past the site of Bonwm Halt to Corwen. As the original Corwen station is now in private use, and the track bed in between also sub-divided, a new station is being built on the eastern side of the town.

The first stage of the project has involved the extension of the line to a temporary station at Corwen East, which opened in October 2014. There was a formal opening ceremony on St David's Day, 1 March 2015, followed by the first full season of trains, in 2015. Corwen last saw main line passenger trains in 1964.[3] As a final stage, the line will be extended a further 200 metres to the new permanent station, Corwen Central, being constructed next to the town's main car park. The new station will feature an island platform with two platform edges (accessed via a pedestrian underpass), a headshunt , and a small siding on the same alignment as, and accessed from, the run-round loop.

Preceding station Disused railways Following station
Bonwm Halt   Great Western Railway
Ruabon to Barmouth Line
  Cynwyd
Gwyddelwern   London and North Western Railway
Denbigh, Ruthin and Corwen Railway
  Terminus

References

  1. ^ Clinker, C.R., (1978) Clinker’s Register of Closed Stations, Avon Anglia ISBN 0-905466-19-5
  2. ^ 1956, Official Handbook of Stations, British Transport Commission
  3. ^ http://corwenstation-new.co.uk/

Further reading

External links

  • Corwen station on navigable 1952 O. S. map
  • New Corwen station appeal

Coordinates: 52°58′53″N 3°22′43″W / 52.98138°N 3.37852°W / 52.98138; -3.37852

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