Colin King-Ansell

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Colin King-Ansell (born 1947) is a prominent figure in far-right politics in New Zealand. He has been described as "New Zealand’s most notorious Nazi cheerleader and Holocaust denier".[1]

Biography

In 1967 he joined the National Socialist Party of New Zealand. In December 1967 King-Ansell was given an 18 months prison sentence for damage to a synagogue.[2][3][4]

King-Ansell first achieved national New Zealand fame in 1968 when he appeared on a television current affairs programme. When questioned about the Holocaust, he dismissed it as lies and Allied propaganda, prompting public anger.[citation needed]

King-Ansell however did not elaborate his views on the screen. Seven years later the current affairs host Brian Edwards said the first tape of the interview was accidentally not broadcast.[5]

In 1969 he became leader of the National Socialist Party.[6] He stood for the National Socialists in the general elections of 1972 and 1975 he contested the Eden electorate and in 1978 he contested the seat of Onehunga.[7] In 1979 he was fined $400 following an appeal against a three-month prison sentence for breaching the Race Relations Act.[8]

In 2006, King-Ansell became chairman of a local business association, Progress Hawera,[9] but was expelled when his far-right past was exposed. He leads the New Zealand National Front. He declared[when?] that he has renounced Nazism.[10]

King-Ansell is, however, still active in racist and neo Nazi politics. At a far right rally in 2017, he, along with other neo Nazis had to be escorted by police away from counter-protesters in order to avert violent clashes.[11]

References

  1. ^ Hitler ’stuffed up a damn good idea’ The Taranaki Daily News 17 June 2006
  2. ^ Spoonley, Paul The Politics of Nostalgia: racism and the extreme right in New Zealand The Dunmore Press (1987) p. 155
  3. ^ "The murky politics of the Right (in New Zealand/Aotearoa)". 16 March 2010.
  4. ^ "Reprint: Salient Interviews Colin King-Ansell (1970)". Retrieved 3 August 2018.
  5. ^ Ku Klux Kiwis Archived 20 June 2005 at the Wayback Machine., Australia/Israel Review, 1998
  6. ^ Spoonley, Paul The Politics of Nostalgia: racism and the extreme right in New Zealand The Dunmore Press (1987) p151
  7. ^ Norton, Clifford (1988). New Zealand Parliamentary Election Results 1946-1987: Occasional Publications No 1, Department of Political Science. Wellington: Victoria University of Wellington. pp. 221, 296. ISBN 0-475-11200-8.
  8. ^ Spoonley, Paul The Politics of Nostalgia: racism and the extreme right in New Zealand The Dunmore Press (1987), p. 155
  9. ^ Exposed! Heil Hawera: Past catches up with former neo-Nazi leader The Taranaki Daily News 17 June 2006.
  10. ^ "Right-wing party 'not recruiting in schools", The Taranaki Daily News, 13 March 2009.
  11. ^ "King-Ansell in violent protests". Aotearoa Independent Media Centre. Retrieved 8 February 2018.
Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Colin_King-Ansell&oldid=853239626"
This content was retrieved from Wikipedia : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colin_King-Ansell
This page is based on the copyrighted Wikipedia article "Colin King-Ansell"; it is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-SA). You may redistribute it, verbatim or modified, providing that you comply with the terms of the CC-BY-SA