Chiyonokuni Toshiki

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Chiyonokuni Toshiki
千代の国 憲輝
Chiyonokuni2 2012 Jan.JPG
Personal information
Born Toshiki Sawada
(1990-07-10) July 10, 1990 (age 28)
Iga, Mie, Japan
Height 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in)
Weight 145 kg (320 lb)
Career
Stable Kokonoe
Current rank see below
Debut May, 2006
Highest rank Maegashira 1 (May 2017)
Championships 2 (Jūryō)
1 (Sandanme)
1 (Jonidan)
Special Prizes 1 Fighting Spirit
Gold Stars 1 (Kakuryū)
* Up to date as of March 25, 2018.

Chiyonokuni Toshiki (born 10 July 1990 as Toshiki Sawada) is a sumo wrestler from Iga, Mie, Japan. Making his professional debut in May 2006, he reached the top makuuchi division for the first time in January 2012. He has a highest rank of maegashira 1, but he has also been restricted by injuries, falling to the sandanme division in 2015 before staging a comeback. He is a member of Kokonoe stable.

Early life and sumo background

Toshiki Sawada was born the son of a Buddhist temple head priest. From a very young age he had great interest in combat sports such as karate. He has said he was in the fourth grade when he first foretold he would be a professional sumo wrestler in the future. As a member of his judo team in junior high school he advanced to the best sixteen in a national tournament.

Career

Upon graduating from junior high school he joined former yokozuna Chiyonofuji's Kokonoe stable. He made his professional debut in May 2006. Though he recorded many winning tournaments in his career in the unsalaried ranks, he also missed four tournaments in this span, which would demote him each time and which he would have to fight back from in following tournaments. From the November 2008 tournament he missed two tournaments in a row, but he bounced back from this in the subsequent March 2009 tournament with a perfect 7-0 followed by a playoff win to take the jonidan championship or yūshō. His fortunes largely changed after this and he had a series of mostly winning tournaments culminating in a 6-1 record at makushita 41 and coming just short of the championship by losing a playoff to Tochitsubasa. He followed this with two strong 5-2 winning tournaments.

During this time, however the ramifications of the match-fixing scandal that would rock the sumo world were becoming apparent. Due to this, Chiyonokuni, along with many other upper makushita wrestlers was promoted to salaried ranks of jūryō for the July 2011 though his actual performance so far would not have not merited promotion. The expelled rikishi included his elder stablemate Chiyohakuho. Chiyonokuni was reported to have very mixed feelings about the scandal and admitted it felt surreal to be promoted to jūryō under such strange circumstances. He did however exceed expectations and about recorded three strong winning tournaments in a row to earn promotion to the top makuuchi division in January 2012.

Although he recorded a winning record in this tournament he had to withdraw due to a dislocated shoulder. In the following tournament in March he injured his shoulder again in a bout with Takanoyama on Day 11, which caused him to miss the May 2012 basho and drop down to the jūryō division. He won the jūryō championship on his comeback in July and returned to the top division in November. After scoring only 5–10 he was demoted to juryo again, but a 9–6 record at Juryo 2 in January 2013 ensured him of another top division return. Though he only managed 7–8 in March 2013 he managed to avoid relegation. He performed creditably in the May 2013 tournament, scoring 9–6, but was injured in the following tournament and withdrew with only two wins, resulting in another demotion to jūryō.

After four tournaments in the second division, he was again promoted to the top division, but another serious injury on only the second day in May 2014 would force him to sit out the rest of the tournament and guarantee his demotion to jūryō. Ranked at the bottom of the jūryō division in September 2014, he withdrew on Day 8 and did not return to competition until March 2015, by which time he had fallen to the fourth sandanme division. He began his comeback by winning the sandanme championship with a perfect 7-0 record, and in January 2016 he returned to sekitori status at jūryō 13 after four straight winning records in the makushita division. He marked ten years as a professional sumo wrestler by winning his second jūryō division championship in May 2016 with a 12–3 record, ensuring his return to the top division for the first time in two years. He achieved eight wins in the July 2016 tournament, his first kachi-koshi or winning record in makuuchi since 2013, although he withdrew because of injury on Day 13 meaning he had only completed three of his nine tournaments ranked in makuuchi.

He attained his highest rank to date of maegashira 1 in the May 2017 tournament, and on Day 2 defeated yokozuna Kakuryū to earn his first gold star or kinboshi.[1] However he was only able to win one other bout and dropped back to maegashira 11 for the July 2017 tournament, where he secured his majority of wins. In May 2018 he earned his first sansho award, for Fighting Spirit, after a career best 12–3 performance.

Fighting style

Chiyonokuni is an oshi-sumo specialist, who prefers pushing and thrusting techniques to fighting on the mawashi or belt. His most common winning kimarite are hataki-komi, the slap down, and oshi-dashi, the push out.

Personal life

Chiyonokuni was married in April 2017 to 26 year-old Ai Hayashi from Sakai, with the reception planned for February 2018. The couple met in 2010 when Chiyonokuni was still ranked in the makushita division.[2]

Career record

Chiyonokuni Toshiki[3]
Year in sumo January
Hatsu basho, Tokyo
March
Haru basho, Osaka
May
Natsu basho, Tokyo
July
Nagoya basho, Nagoya
September
Aki basho, Tokyo
November
Kyūshū basho, Fukuoka
2006 x x (Maezumo) West Jonokuchi #38
6–1
 
West Jonidan #76
Sat out due to injury
0–0–7
East Jonokuchi #26
5–2
 
2007 West Jonidan #97
4–3
 
East Jonidan #71
6–1
 
East Jonidan #1
3–4
 
West Jonidan #16
Sat out due to injury
0–0–7
West Jonidan #87
5–2
 
East Jonidan #47
4–3
 
2008 East Jonidan #21
4–3
 
East Sandanme #100
4–3
 
West Sandanme #81
5–2
 
West Sandanme #51
5–2
 
East Sandanme #22
3–4
 
West Sandanme #34
Sat out due to injury
0–0–7
2009 West Sandanme #94
Sat out due to injury
0–0–7
West Jonidan #55
7–0–P
Champion

 
East Sandanme #55
4–3
 
East Sandanme #41
6–1
 
East Makushita #54
2–5
 
East Sandanme #18
4–3
 
2010 East Sandanme #8
4–3
 
East Makushita #58
6–1
 
East Makushita #24
4–3
 
West Makushita #20
2–5
 
East Makushita #36
3–4
 
East Makushita #41
6–1–P
 
2011 West Makushita #17
5–2
 

Tournament Cancelled
0–0–15
East Makushita #9
5–2
 
East Jūryō #11
8–7
 
East Jūryō #9
10–5
 
East Jūryō #3
9–6
 
2012 East Maegashira #13
9–5–1
 
East Maegashira #8
3–10–2
 
West Maegashira #14
Sat out due to injury
0–0–15
East Jūryō #11
11–4
Champion

 
East Jūryō #3
10–5
 
West Maegashira #14
5–10
 
2013 East Jūryō #2
9–6
 
East Maegashira #14
7–8
 
East Maegashira #15
9–6
 
West Maegashira #10
2–3–10
 
West Jūryō #2
7–8
 
West Jūryō #3
7–6–2
 
2014 East Jūryō #5
7–8
 
East Jūryō #6
9–6
 
West Maegashira #16
0–2–13
 
West Jūryō #11
6–9
 
West Jūryō #13
3–5–7
 
East Makushita #8
Sat out due to injury
0–0–7
2015 West Makushita #48
Sat out due to injury
0–0–7
West Sandanme #28
7–0
Champion

 
West Makushita #18
4–3
 
West Makushita #14
4–3
 
East Makushita #10
5–2
 
West Makushita #4
5–2
 
2016 West Jūryō #13
10–5
 
East Jūryō #7
9–6
 
East Jūryō #3
12–3
Champion

 
East Maegashira #9
8–5–2
 
East Maegashira #6
8–7
 
West Maegashira #4
5–10
 
2017 West Maegashira #8
9–6
 
East Maegashira #6
9–6
 
East Maegashira #1
2–13
East Maegashira #11
8–7
 
East Maegashira #7
9–6
 
East Maegashira #4
6–9
 
2018 West Maegashira #7
6–9
 
West Maegashira #10
7–8
 
West Maegashira #11
12–3
F
West Maegashira #2

 
x x
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Top Division Runner-up Retired Lower Divisions

Sanshō key: F=Fighting spirit; O=Outstanding performance; T=Technique     Also shown: =Kinboshi(s); P=Playoff(s)
Divisions: MakuuchiJūryōMakushitaSandanmeJonidanJonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks: YokozunaŌzekiSekiwakeKomusubiMaegashira

See also

References

  1. ^ "Sumo: Kisensato rebounds for 1st win of summer tourney". Kyodo News. 15 May 2017. Retrieved 15 May 2017. 
  2. ^ "角界一のイケメン、千代の国が結婚 お相手は航空会社勤務の愛さん" (in Japanese). Chunichi. 26 April 2017. Retrieved 26 April 2017. 
  3. ^ "Chiyonokuni Toshiki Rikishi Information". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 2012-09-12. 

External links

  • Chiyonokuni Toshiki's official biography (English) at the Grand Sumo Homepage
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