Brisbane Baylands development

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Brisbane Baylands
Location Brisbane, California
Coordinates 37°42′25″N 122°24′14″W / 37.707°N 122.404°W / 37.707; -122.404Coordinates: 37°42′25″N 122°24′14″W / 37.707°N 122.404°W / 37.707; -122.404
Developer Universal Paragon Corporation
Website brisbanebaylands.com
Brisbane Baylands is located in San Francisco
Brisbane Baylands
Brisbane Baylands
Brisbane Baylands (San Francisco)

The Brisbane Baylands is a 660-acre (270 ha) parcel of land in Brisbane, near the border with San Francisco.[1] There have been several proposals to develop the site, which was previously used as a railyard and a municipal landfill; historical uses have led to contaminated soil, polluted stormwater runoff, and potential buried toxic waste. None of the present proposals have been approved by Brisbane's city council.

Historical uses

The San Francisco Bay shoreline was just east of what is present-day Bayshore Boulevard; debris from the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fill taken from the construction of the five tunnels of the Bayshore Cut-Off, which opened in 1907, were used to fill in the Bay and create a classification yard for Southern Pacific.[2] San Francisco's municipal landfill was in operation from 1932 to 1967, filling in Brisbane Lagoon.[3]

Brisbane Baylands Plan

The Brisbane Baylands site is owned by Universal Paragon Corporation (UPC).[1][4] The site is being planned for significant regional transportation improvements as analyzed in the Bi-County Transportation Study,[5] including a multi-modal transit station connecting Caltrain, an extended Muni Metro T Third Street train, the planned Geneva-Harney Bus Rapid Transit, and multiple bus routes operated by Muni and SamTrans. UPC's land use proposal, one of several introduced to Brisbane's city council, calls for a major remediation program that would be followed by the development of an entertainment district that could include an arena, concert theater and cineplex, 12,500,000 square feet (1,160,000 m2) of R&D, 1.5 million of office, 64,000 feet (20,000 m) of civic space, 287,000 square feet (26,700 m2) of retail, 4,434 housing units, a high school, transit/roadway improvements, 25-acre solar farm and nearly 200 acres of open space.[6]

The Brisbane Planning Commission submitted an alternative plan to the City Council that would not contain any new housing units.

Project Status

UPC originally submitted a draft plan to the City in 2005.[1] In 2010, UPC revised the plan and submitted an updated Baylands Specific Plan Executive Summary[permanent dead link] and Appendix.[4] In Feb 2011, UPC submitted the draft Brisbane Baylands Specific Plan and associated Infrastructure Master Plan. The project is projected to create 15,000 – 20,000 permanent jobs and would be built over a 30-year plan. The Baylands is the subject of an environmental impact report (EIR) prepared and released by the City of Brisbane on June 11, 2013. One of the major findings of the EIR is that "Brisbane currently is a job rich city...more than four times as many jobs as employed residents...the ratio between jobs and employed residents in Brisbane is not balanced...such an imbalance between jobs and housing typically contribute to higher homes prices due to demand outstripping supply, increased traffic congestion in the area, increase air and noise pollution, and longer commute times for workers..." The EIR found that by providing housing adjacent to the proposed office and transit improvements, car trips and the associated greenhouse gases would be significantly reduced. In addition to the applicant's proposal, the EIR analyzes a Community Alternative which the Brisbane City Council approved for study in July, 2009,[7][8] as well as the Renewable Energy Alternative Plan put forth by CREBL (Citizens for Renewable Energy on the Bay Lands).[9]

References

  1. ^ a b c Torassa, Ulysses (October 28, 2004). "Lofty plans for former landfill". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved October 28, 2004. 
  2. ^ "Bayshore Roundhouse: Part One". San Francisco Trains. Retrieved 17 April 2017. 
  3. ^ Carlsson, Chris. "San Francisco's Trash". FoundSF. Retrieved 17 April 2017. 
  4. ^ a b Dineen, J.K. (May 27, 2010). "4,500 homes proposed for Brisbane's Baylands". San Francisco Business Times. Retrieved May 27, 2010. 
  5. ^ [1]
  6. ^ Fancher, Emily. "Baylands debate centers on housing,sustainability" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on July 8, 2011. Retrieved August 28, 2009. 
  7. ^ Fancher, Emily (August 27, 2010). "UPC pushes Baylands plan" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on July 8, 2011. Retrieved August 27, 2010.  The draft EIR was released by the City of Brisbane on June 11, 2013. One of the major findings of the EIR is that "Brisbane currently is a job rich city...(more than four times as many jobs as employed residents)...the ratio between jobs and employed residents in Brisbane is not balanced...such an imbalance between jobs and housing typically contribute to higher homes prices due to demand outstripping supply, increased traffic congestion in the area, increase air and noise pollution, and longer commute times for workers..." The EIR found that by providing housing adjacent to the proposed office and transit improvements, car trips and the associated greenhouse gases would be significantly reduced.
  8. ^ [2]
  9. ^ Brisbane Baylands Environmental Impact Report Alternative Proposals

External links

  • Brisbane Baylands
  • "Baylands Information". City of Brisbane. 2017. Retrieved 17 April 2017. 
  • Universal Paragon Corporation's Brisbane Baylands project page
  • Universal Paragon Corporation home page
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