Blyth, Ontario

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Coordinates: 43°44′10″N 81°25′45″W / 43.736081°N 81.429162°W / 43.736081; -81.429162

Blyth
Unincorporated community
Blyth is located in Southern Ontario
Blyth
Blyth
Location of Blyth in Southern Ontario
Coordinates: 43°44′5″N 81°25′42″W / 43.73472°N 81.42833°W / 43.73472; -81.42833
Country Canada
Province Ontario
County Huron
Township North Huron
Founded 1877
Population
(2011)[1]
 • Total 1,005
Time zone UTC-5 (EST)
 • Summer (DST) UTC-4 (EDT)
Postal code
NTS Map 040P11
GNBC Code FAKIA

Blyth is a village in North Huron, Huron County, Ontario, Canada.

Blyth is 85 km (53 mi) north of London and 79 km (49 mi) west of Waterloo at the intersection of Huron County Road 4 (London Road) and Huron County Road 25 (Blyth Road). Blyth is also 24 km (15 mi) inland from Lake Huron.

The 2016 Canadian Census showed Blyth had a population of approximately 1,000 residents.

Despite its small size, Blyth has a significant national presence. The village attracts hundreds of thousands of visitors annually to its world-renowned theatre, destination craft brewery and large municipal campground. As well, Blyth has several prominent employers creating job opportunities not found in many rural regions of Canada.

Residents pronounce the name of their village "bly-eth" rather than "blithe".

Several[specify] noteworthy Canadians come from Blyth.

History

The first European settlers, Lucius McConnell and Kenneth McBean, arrived in what is now Blyth in 1851. The first store was opened by John Templeton. In 1854, John Drummond built the first hotel. A shoe shop, blacksmith shop, tailor shop and sawmill were all set up around the same time[1].

By 1855, a layout for the village of Drummond was made, however the village was renamed Blyth in recognition of British land speculator Henry Blyth. In 1856, a post office was established and until 1891, the postal service officially, and incorrectly, spelled Blyth with an "e" on the end (Blythe).

By the mid-1860s, Blyth's businesses included a grist and flour mill, steam sawmill, 4 general stores, stove and tinshop, carriage and wagon factory, 3 blacksmith shops, a saddlery, a tailor shop, 3 shoe shops, a cooper shop, 3 hotls and one medical doctor[1].

In 1875, the first train arrived in Blyth, along a newly constructed London, Huron, Bruce track. The north to south Canadian National Railway line operated in Blyth from 1975 to 1941[1].

In 1876, the first train service, The London, Huron and Bruce Railway, came to Blyth. One year later, the village was incorporated with a population of approximately 800 residents. The community's first elected reeve was Patrick Kelly[1].

In 1877, a two-room public school was built and opened.

In the 1890s, a chopping mill and cider press were opened. Other early businesses in Blyth included a bake shop, a cement block making shop, a Massey Harris implement shop, a livery, a dressmaker shop, the copper shop that made renowned apple barrels [1]. In 1896, a four-room public school was constructed at the corner of King and Wellington Streets.

In 1907, a stop of the Canadian Pacific Railway line from Guelph to Goderich was established in Blyth. The daily train included a passenger coach.

In 1920, construction began on the Blyth Memorial Hall, a joint effort by residents of Blyth and the Townships of East Wawanosh, Morris and Hullett. The Hall aimed to commemorate the lives of local World War 1 soldiers who died in the war. The sod was first turned and first cornerstone laid on July 28, 1920. The Hall placed 600 opera chairs in its auditorium and construction costs were estimated at $25,000[1]. The Hall was frequently used in its early days for "banquets, council meetings, wedding receptions, Division Court Sessions, community dances"[1] along with vaudeville productions, community musicals and local talent shows. However, interest in the Hall waned by the mid-1950s, and the auditorium was rarely used and eventually condemned. A local group of citizens campaigned and fundraised to renovate it.

In 1975, the Blyth Festival produced its first professional theatre production in Blyth. The summer theatre eventually turned into the Blyth Centre for the Arts, incorporating an art gallery, choir and orchestra.[2] The village has been recognized as a model for Canadian rural communities who incorporate arts and culture to diversify community economy[3] to move beyond solely an agriculture-based model.

Today, Blyth is a rural Canadian success story. With local industry, culture and the arts, the village continues to build upon the proud legacy of the courageous men and women who first established this community.

Noteworthy Canadians From Blyth

Lorna Bray Debliquy: Female aviation pioneer and member of The Order of Canada.

John B. Kelly: Creator of the first automobile in Ontario (4 years before Henry Ford made his first car.

Ron Mason: Most successful hockey coach in NCAA history. Member of the United States Hockey Hall of Fame.

Justin Peters: Professional hockey player (goalie). Bronze medalist - 2018 Canadian Men's Olympic Hockey Team.

Ernie Phillips: Resident and long-time engraver of the NHL's Stanley Cup.

Awards

In 2001, Blyth won the Communities in Bloom National Award in the category of 1 to 1000 population.[4] This award recognizes civic pride, environmental responsibility and beautification through community involvement and the challenge of a national program, with focus on enhancing green spaces in communities.

Climate

Climate data for Blyth, 1981−2010 normals, extremes 1959−2010
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 18.0
(64.4)
17.5
(63.5)
24.5
(76.1)
30.0
(86)
32.5
(90.5)
34.5
(94.1)
36.5
(97.7)
35.5
(95.9)
34.0
(93.2)
29.5
(85.1)
21.0
(69.8)
17.5
(63.5)
36.5
(97.7)
Average high °C (°F) −3.8
(25.2)
−2
(28)
2.7
(36.9)
10.7
(51.3)
17.5
(63.5)
23.2
(73.8)
25.9
(78.6)
24.8
(76.6)
20.5
(68.9)
13.2
(55.8)
6.1
(43)
−0.4
(31.3)
11.5
(52.7)
Daily mean °C (°F) −7
(19)
−5.7
(21.7)
−1.4
(29.5)
6.0
(42.8)
12.2
(54)
17.7
(63.9)
20.4
(68.7)
19.5
(67.1)
15.5
(59.9)
9.1
(48.4)
3.1
(37.6)
−3.2
(26.2)
7.2
(45)
Average low °C (°F) −10.2
(13.6)
−9.4
(15.1)
−5.5
(22.1)
1.3
(34.3)
6.8
(44.2)
12.1
(53.8)
14.8
(58.6)
14.1
(57.4)
10.5
(50.9)
4.9
(40.8)
0.1
(32.2)
−6
(21)
2.8
(37)
Record low °C (°F) −31.1
(−24)
−36
(−33)
−28.5
(−19.3)
−16.1
(3)
−5
(23)
−1.1
(30)
1.7
(35.1)
0.0
(32)
−3.5
(25.7)
−10
(14)
−16
(3)
−28.5
(−19.3)
−36
(−33)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 130.5
(5.138)
93.8
(3.693)
74.9
(2.949)
84.5
(3.327)
102.6
(4.039)
81.5
(3.209)
80.6
(3.173)
101.4
(3.992)
123.1
(4.846)
102.0
(4.016)
126.4
(4.976)
145.6
(5.732)
1,246.9
(49.091)
Average rainfall mm (inches) 26.1
(1.028)
27.6
(1.087)
37.6
(1.48)
70.4
(2.772)
102.3
(4.028)
81.5
(3.209)
80.6
(3.173)
101.4
(3.992)
123.1
(4.846)
97.6
(3.843)
84.7
(3.335)
40.1
(1.579)
872.8
(34.362)
Average snowfall cm (inches) 104.4
(41.1)
66.2
(26.06)
37.4
(14.72)
14.1
(5.55)
0.3
(0.12)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
4.4
(1.73)
41.8
(16.46)
105.5
(41.54)
374.1
(147.28)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.2 mm) 16.9 13.1 11.7 11 11.2 9.3 8.8 9.3 11.9 12.7 15.5 17.4 148.6
Source: Environment Canada[5][6]

Media

Blyth is home to the North Huron Citizen print and online newspaper.

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Centennial Committee (1977). Blyth centennial, 1877-1977: Village of Blyth, Huron County's youngest village celebrates 100 years of progress.
  2. ^ "About Us". Blyth Festival. Blyth Festival. Retrieved 15 September 2018.
  3. ^ Mitchell, Clare J.A. (December 1993). "Economic impact of the arts: Theatre festivals in small Ontario communities". Journal of Cultural Economics. 17 (2): 55–67. doi:10.1007/BF02310582.
  4. ^ http://www.communitiesinbloom.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/2001-National-Results-EN-FR.pdf
  5. ^ "Blyth, Ontario". Canadian Climate Normals 1981–2010. Environment Canada. Retrieved January 20, 2018.
  6. ^ "Daily Data Report for January 2018". Canadian Climate Data. Environment Canada. Retrieved 20 January 2018.
  • The Settlement Of Huron County, by James Scott.

External links

  • BlythNow
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