Billy Stark

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Billy Stark
Billy Stark (2009)
Stark as Scotland under-21 head coach, in 2009
Personal information
Full name William Stark
Date of birth (1956-12-01) 1 December 1956 (age 61)
Place of birth Glasgow, Scotland
Playing position Midfielder
Club information
Current team
Scotland U19 (head coach)
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1975–1983 St Mirren 255 (60)
1983–1987 Aberdeen 109 (41)
1987–1990 Celtic 64 (17)
1990–1992 Kilmarnock 22 (6)
1992–1993 Hamilton Academical 14 (0)
1993–1994 Kilmarnock 36 (3)
Total 500 (127)
National team
1985 Scotland U21[1] 1 (0)
Teams managed
1994–1997 Celtic (assistant)
1997 Celtic (caretaker)
1997–2000 Greenock Morton
2001–2004 St Johnstone
2004–2008 Queen's Park
2008–2014 Scotland U21
2012–2013 Scotland (caretaker)
2015–2017 Albion Rovers (assistant)
2017–2018 East Kilbride
2018– Scotland U19
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

Billy Stark (born 1 December 1956) is a Scottish football player and coach.

Playing career

Born in Glasgow, Stark made his professional debut in 1975 in nearby Paisley for St Mirren. Two years later he won his first honour, a First Division winners medal. After 255 games for St Mirren, scoring 60 goals, he was signed by Aberdeen for £80,000. During a period of success for the side, he helped Aberdeen to win a European Super Cup in 1983, a Premier Division and Scottish Cup double in 1984, another league title the following year and a League Cup and Scottish Cup double in 1986.

Stark was signed by Celtic in 1987, for a £100,000 transfer fee. In three seasons with the club he won two further Scottish Cups and a League Championship, before leaving for Kilmarnock for two seasons. In 1992, he transferred to Hamilton Academical as a player/coach, but returned to Kilmarnock the following year under manager and former Celtic colleague Tommy Burns. Stark retired from playing in 1994, having scored over 100 league goals.

Coaching career

After retiring as a player, Stark became assistant to Tommy Burns at Celtic. When Burns left Celtic in 1997, Stark managed the side for three matches in a caretaker capacity before leaving himself. Stark then had spells managing Greenock Morton and St Johnstone[2] before becoming Queen's Park manager in 2004.[3]

Stark led Queen's to one of their greatest results of modern times in August 2006 at Firhill Stadium, when Queen's Park beat his former club Aberdeen on penalty kicks after a 0-0 draw in the 2006–07 Scottish League Cup.[4] Stark also led the Glasgow club to promotion from the Scottish Third Division and later hailed the achievement as the highlight of his football career.[5]

Stark left Queen's Park on 1 January 2008 to work for the Scottish Football Association, a role that involved managing the under-21 national team. They reached the qualification playoffs for the 2011 European championship, but they lost out to Iceland.[6] David Goodwillie, Danny Wilson and Barry Bannan were promoted from the under-21s to the full national team selected by Craig Levein in November 2010.[6] The team finished in second place in their qualifying group for the 2013 European championship, but did not gather enough points to be eligible for the playoffs.

Stark was placed in caretaker charge of the Scotland national team for a friendly against Luxembourg in November 2012, following the departure of Craig Levein.[7] Stark resigned from the position of Scotland under-21 manager in November 2014.[8]

In June 2015, Stark was appointed assistant manager to Darren Young at newly promoted Scottish League One side Albion Rovers.[9]

In June 2017, he was appointed manager at Scottish Lowland Football League side East Kilbride.[10] He resigned from this position shortly before the end of the 2017–18 season.[11] Stark then returned to the Scottish Football Association, within this role he became head coach of the under-19 national team.

Honours

Manager

Queen's Park

References

  1. ^ http://www.fitbastats.com/scotlandu21/player.php?playerid=122
  2. ^ "Stark is new Saints boss". BBC Sport. BBC. 5 October 2001.
  3. ^ "Spiders appoint Stark boss". BBC Sport. BBC. 27 August 2004.
  4. ^ "Queen's Pk 0-0 Aberdeen (5-3 pen)". BBC Sport. BBC. 22 August 2006.
  5. ^ "Stark hails highlight of career". BBC Sport. BBC. 12 May 2007.
  6. ^ a b "Coach Billy Stark proud of Scotland U21s development". BBC Sport. BBC. 17 November 2010. Retrieved 18 November 2010.
  7. ^ "Craig Levein removed as Scotland manager by Scottish FA". STV Sport. STV Group. 5 November 2012. Retrieved 5 November 2012.
  8. ^ "Scotland: Billy Stark 'steps down' as under-21 coach". BBC Sport. BBC. 4 November 2014. Retrieved 4 November 2014.
  9. ^ "Rovers role for Stark". www.spfl.co.uk. Scottish Professional Football League. 15 June 2015. Retrieved 15 June 2015.
  10. ^ Thomson, Paul (16 June 2017). "East Kilbride appoint former Celtic star Billy Stark as new manager". Daily Record. Retrieved 16 June 2017.
  11. ^ Thomson, Paul (2 May 2018). "Billy Stark quits role as East Kilbride boss". Daily Record. Retrieved 2 May 2018.

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