Baatarsuren Shuudertsetseg

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Baatarsuren Shuudertsetseg
Photograph of Shuudertsetseg Baatarsuren
Born Baatarsuren Togtokhbayar
(1971-01-18) January 18, 1971 (age 47)
Mongolia
Occupation Author, filmmaker, humanitarian
Citizenship Mongolian
Genre Young Adult novels, Historical Novels
Years active 1995–present
Spouse B.Boldkhuyag (1991–present)
Children 3

Signature

Baatarsuren Shuudertsetseg (Mongolian: Баатарсүрэн Шүүдэрцэцэг, born Baatarsuren Togtokhbayar Mongolian: Баатарсүрэн Тогтохбаяр; January 18, 1971) is a Mongolian journalist, author, filmmaker, and humanitarian.[1] She has received numerous Mongolian literary awards including ‘Featured Book’ awards in 2007 for her novel Шүрэн бугуйвч (Coral Bracelet) and in 2008 for her CD Шүүдэрцэцэг (Shuudertsetseg). Her 2010 novel Домогт Ану хатан (The Legendary Queen Anu) was named National Book of the Year for Mongolian Literature.[2] In 2012 she wrote the screenplay for, produced, and directed the film version of Домогт Ану хатан, released internationally as “Warrior Princess”.[3]

In addition to her film and writing careers, Shuudertsetseg is noted for her humanitarian efforts. In 2008, the Organizing Committee of Amnesty International Mongolia named her “Human Rights Activist of the Year” for her contributions to gender equality and human rights. She sits on the International Board of Directors of the Mongolian Women's Fund “MONES”[4] and is a member of Amnesty International’s women's group. In 1996, while working as a reporter at the daily newspaper Ардын эрх (People’s Right), she was named “Journalist of the Year” for her stories on children’s rights.

Early life

Shuudertsetseg was born in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia on January 18, 1971. She attended Public Elementary School No. 1, and then the Mustafa Kemal Atatürk Secondary School (Public School No. 5), graduating in 1989. She went on to study Journalism at Russia's Irkutsk State University and then pursued post graduate studies at the National University of Mongolia in Ulaanbaatar where she graduated in 1995 with a master's degree in journalism.

She began work as a journalist in 1995 covering the Law and Crime beat at the state-owned newspaper Ардын эрх (People’s Right). In 1996 she earned the “Journalist of the Year” award for her stories on children’s rights. She became spokesperson for the Democratic Party government under Prime Minister Mendsaikhan Enkhsaikhan in 1997, but then joined the "Anons” journalism center as its director a year later in 1998. From 1999-2000 she was the executive director of the Mongolian Union of Journalists and in 2001 she became editor of the Алтан шар сонин (Golden Orange Newspaper). It was during her tenure at Алтан шар сонин that she adopted the pen name Shuudertsetseg based on the recommendation of her husband.[5]

Career

Shuudertsetseg published her first novel Хулан (Khulan) in 2003. Several popular novels followed, including; Шүрэн бугуйвч (Coral Bracelet), Э-майлаар илгээсэн захиа сарнай (Rose Sent by Email), Үйсэн дээрх бичээс (Script Carved on Wood), Чимээгүй хашгираан (Silent Scream), Цасан нулимс (Snow Tears), Зургадугаар сарын цас (June Snow), Сэтгэлийн анир (Spiritual peace), and Novels. Her early works dealt mainly with themes of Mongolian national and cultural identity and the struggles of young adults living in modern-day Mongolia.

In 2009, she and her daughter Amina translated The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank (Анне Франкийн өдрийн тэмдэглэл) into Mongolian. That same year she published a collection of biographies on well known female writers Дэлхийн алдартай эмэгтэй зохиолчид (World’s Best Women Writers).

Shuudertsetseg then turned to writing historical fiction and in 2010 published Домогт Ану хатан (The Legendary Queen Anu) about the eponymous 17th century Mongol Dzungar Khanate queen who led troops and died at the Battle of Zuunmod in 1696. The work touched on themes found in her earlier works, including the importance of family, women's empowerment, and national identity. It was named National Book of the Year for Mongolian Literature and was adapted for the stage and opened at the National Academic Drama Theatre in March 2011. Shuudertsetseg adapted The Legendary Queen Anu as a full-length feature film in 2012. She wrote the screenplay, produced and directed Queen Ahno - Spirit of a Warrior, also titled Warrior Princess, which became the most expensive Mongolian film ever made. It was released in January 2013 and went on to become one of Mongolia's highest-grossing films.[6]

In 2015 she published another historical novel Үүлэн хээтэй орчлон (Cloud-Shaped World) set during Mongolia's struggle for independence in the early 20th century.

Humanitarian Work

Shuudertsetseg is very active in promoting human rights issues, particularly gender equality in Mongolia. In 2008 the Amnesty International Mongolia Organizing Committee named her “Human Rights Activist of the Year” for her contributions to gender equality and human rights. She sits on the International Board of Directors of the Mongolian Women's Fund MONES and is a member of Amnesty International’s women's group. She was active in the Women’s National Peace movement that lobbied for women’s rights in Mongolia’s Parliament by drafting and supporting equal gender rights legislation. She is an active supporter of the Mongolian National Center Against Violence, which helps young girls and women who are victims of violence.

Many of Shuudertsetseg's literary and visual arts endeavors have highlighted gender equality and equal rights for women. Women's rights were the central theme of 180 Degrees, a television drama she wrote and which was created by her production company Shuuder Productions. On May 3, 2008 she delivered a presentation on "Renaissance of Feminism in Mongolia," at a lecture series sponsored by Amnesty International at the Mongolian State University. She has contributed to the 11Eleven Project,[7] a documentary promoting cross cultural understanding in an increasingly globalized world and has contributed several articles on women’s rights, gender bias, and equality to Mongolian and international media outlets.[8]

Personal life

She married fellow journalist B.Boldkhuyag (Б.Болдхуяг) in 1991. Together they have three daughters; Amina, Ankhilmaa, and Anima.[9]

References

  1. ^ "Author: Baatarsüren Togtokhbayar Pen Name B.Shuudertsetseg". Mirnom. Retrieved 24 August 2015.
  2. ^ "B. Shuudertsetseg". Internom.mn. Retrieved 24 August 2015.
  3. ^ "Warrior Princess (2014)". IMDB. Retrieved 24 August 2015.
  4. ^ "Mongolian Women's Fund - Board of Directors". Mones.org.mn. Archived from the original on September 26, 2015. Retrieved 25 August 2015.
  5. ^ "Three daughters, mother and a good producer, 24 facts about writer and journalist B.Shuudertsetseg". 24tsag. Retrieved 23 August 2015.
  6. ^ "Golden Network speaks Mongolian". Screendaily.com. Retrieved 24 August 2015.
  7. ^ "11eleven project, Writer Shuudertsetseg from Mongoli". YouTube. Retrieved 24 August 2015.
  8. ^ "Shuudertsetseg Biography". Facebook. Retrieved 24 August 2015.
  9. ^ "Three daughters, mother and a good producer, 24 facts about writer and journalist B.Shuudertsetseg". 24tsag. Retrieved 23 August 2015.


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