August 1935

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The following events occurred in August 1935:

August 1, 1935 (Thursday)

August 2, 1935 (Friday)

August 3, 1935 (Saturday)

  • Defrocked Anglican priest Harold Davidson was arrested and charged with attempting suicide, having been on exhibition for the past ten days with a sign that he was "fasting unto death" in protest against a ruling prohibiting him from performing church duties.[2]
  • The August issue of Vanity Fair was banned in Japan because a caricature of Emperor Hirohito appeared in the magazine.[3]
  • About 25,000 people in Harlem, New York marched in protest against the threatened Italian invasion of Ethiopia.[4]
  • Born: Georgy Shonin, cosmonaut, in Rovenky, USSR (d. 1997)

August 4, 1935 (Sunday)

August 5, 1935 (Monday)

  • A typhoon struck Quanzhou, China killing hundreds.[6]
  • Field Marshal August von Mackensen published a letter resigning his honorary chairmanship of the Stahlhelm. He thanked the members for their dedication and explained that the organization's purpose had been fulfilled by Hitler's conscription army.[7]
  • Died: David Townsend, 43, American art director (auto accident)

August 6, 1935 (Tuesday)

  • Riots broke out in the French cities of Paris, Le Havre and Brest in protest of government economic measures.[8]
  • The mayor of the German spa town of Bad Tölz ordered all Jews to leave within 24 hours. A Jewish owned-hotel was closed by police to "protect it".[9]
  • Abyssinia Crisis: Italy called 75,000 more men to arms.[10]

August 7, 1935 (Wednesday)

August 8, 1935 (Thursday)

  • At least 5 were killed and between 100 and 200 injured in more anti-government rioting in Toulon.[14]
  • Born: Joe Tex, musician, in Rogers, Texas (d. 1982)

August 9, 1935 (Friday)

  • French Prime Minister Pierre Laval called an unprecedented meeting of all 86 prefects across the country and instructed them to firmly enforce his unpopular deflationary measures.[15]
  • Huey Long claimed on the floor of the Senate that his foes had discussed a plot to assassinate him.[16]

August 10, 1935 (Saturday)

  • A plot to assassinate Mexican President Lázaro Cárdenas was reported foiled.[8]
  • The last remaining Freemason lodges in Nazi Germany were dissolved.[17]
  • Laval warned that a dictatorship in France was not unlikely if his economic measures failed to be enforced.[18]

August 11, 1935 (Sunday)

  • Adolf Hitler made his first public speech since his operation in May,[19] emerging from his retreat in the Bavarian mountains to give an address in Rosenheim warning his opponents that the Nazis were ready to crush all opposition.[20]
  • The football club Sportivo Trinidense was founded in Paraguay.

August 12, 1935 (Monday)

August 13, 1935 (Tuesday)

August 14, 1935 (Wednesday)

August 15, 1935 (Thursday)

August 16, 1935 (Friday)

  • Representatives of France, Great Britain and Italy met in Paris to negotiate a solution to the Abyssinia Crisis.[28]
  • Haile Selassie offered new economic concessions to Italy, stressing he would not accept a military occupation but would grant facilities for mining, road construction and railway operations.[29]

August 17, 1935 (Saturday)

August 18, 1935 (Sunday)

  • The Paris conference broke up with nothing resolved.[30]
  • At the opening of a fair in Königsberg, Reich Economics Minister Hjalmar Schacht said that certain Nazi policies were bad for the country's business. While agreeing with the government that secret societies had no right to exist, pastors and priests should not dabble in politics, and Jews "must resign themselves to a realization that their influence is broken in Germany once and for all", Schacht said that these issues could not be settled through actions that "seriously disturb business."[31]
  • Born: Rafer Johnson, decathlete and actor, in Hillsboro, Texas; Hifikepunye Pohamba, 2nd President of Namibia, in Okanghudi, South-West Africa

August 19, 1935 (Monday)

August 20, 1935 (Tuesday)

August 21, 1935 (Wednesday)

  • The U.S. Senate passed a bill declaring American neutrality in foreign wars. The measure banned shipment of arms to belligerents and declared that American citizens traveling on the ships of warring nations were doing so at their own risk. President Roosevelt reserved comment on the measure pending its study.[35]
  • The Cecil B. DeMille-directed historical adventure film The Crusades premiered at the Astor Theatre in New York City.[36]
  • Died: John Hartley, 86, English tennis player

August 22, 1935 (Thursday)

August 23, 1935 (Friday)

August 24, 1935 (Saturday)

August 25, 1935 (Sunday)

  • The U.S. State Department published the text of a note sent to the Soviet Union, threatening an interruption of friendly relations unless the Soviets put a stop to plotting the violent overthrow of the American government.[41]
  • Iran and the Soviet Union signed the Treaty of Establishment, Commerce and Navigation.
  • Died: Mack Swain, 59, American actor and vaudeville performer

August 26, 1935 (Monday)

August 27, 1935 (Tuesday)

August 28, 1935 (Wednesday)

  • In an address to 2,000 Catholic nurses, Pope Pius XI commented on the Abyssinia Crisis by saying, "A war of sheer conquest and nothing else would certainly be an unjust war. It ought, therefore, to be unimaginable – a thing sad and horrible beyond expression. An unjust war is unthinkable. We cannot admit its possibility, and we deliberately reject it ... if it be true that the need for expansion and the need for frontier defence do exist, then we cannot forbid ourselves from hoping that the need will be met by means other than war."[46]
  • Former Vienna police chief Otto Steinhäusl went before a court-martial, charged with high treason for his role in the July Putsch.[47]

August 29, 1935 (Thursday)

August 30, 1935 (Friday)

August 31, 1935 (Saturday)

References

  1. ^ Agnihotri, V.K., ed. (2010). Indian History, Twenty-Sixth Edition. Allied Publishers. p. C-257. ISBN 978-81-8424-568-4. 
  2. ^ "Pastor Ousted for Immorality Arrested Again". Chicago Daily Tribune. August 4, 1935. p. 4. 
  3. ^ "U. S. Magazine 'Slurs' Mikado; Japan Angered". Chicago Daily Tribune. August 4, 1935. p. 1. 
  4. ^ "25,000 Harlem Residents March with Ethiopian Flag". Chicago Daily Tribune. August 4, 1935. p. 9. 
  5. ^ a b c d "1935". MusicAndHistory. Archived from the original on August 28, 2012. Retrieved July 24, 2015. 
  6. ^ "Typhoon Lashes China". Chicago Daily Tribune. August 6, 1935. p. 4. 
  7. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (August 5, 1935). "War Hero Rings Down Curtain on German Vets". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 3. 
  8. ^ a b c d Mercer, Derrik (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. p. 455. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3. 
  9. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (August 7, 1935). "400 Jews Chased Out of German Health Resort". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 3. 
  10. ^ "Italy Orders 75,000 More Men to Arms". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. August 6, 1935. p. 1. 
  11. ^ "100,000 Yell Battle Cry in Ethiopia". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. August 7, 1935. p. 1. 
  12. ^ "Louis Stops Levinsky in 1st Round". Chicago Daily Tribune. August 8, 1935. p. 1. 
  13. ^ "Italian Cabinet Minister, 6 Others Killed in Plane". Chicago Daily Tribune. August 9, 1935. p. 1. 
  14. ^ "French Pay Cut Riots Spread; 5 Die; 100 Hurt". Chicago Daily Tribune. August 9, 1935. p. 1. 
  15. ^ "Laval Defiant; Warns France Pay Cuts Stand". Chicago Daily Tribune. August 10, 1935. p. 4. 
  16. ^ "Senator Huey Long is Shot". Chicago Daily Tribune. September 9, 1935. p. 1. 
  17. ^ "Nazis to Ban Masons for 'Jewish Plot'". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. August 8, 1935. p. 1. 
  18. ^ "Laval Warns of Dictatorship". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. August 10, 1935. p. 1. 
  19. ^ Görtemaker, Heike B. (2012). Eva Braun: Life With Hitler. New York: Vintage Books. pp. 93–94. ISBN 978-0-307-74260-5. 
  20. ^ "Nazis Ready to Crush All Foes, Hitler Declares". Chicago Daily Tribune. August 12, 1935. p. 2. 
  21. ^ "Warns African War May Touch Off Race Strife". Chicago Daily Tribune. August 13, 1935. p. 4. 
  22. ^ "Tageseinträge für 12. August 1935". chroniknet. Retrieved July 24, 2015. 
  23. ^ "Search Mud for Victims of Dam Break in Italy". Chicago Daily Tribune. August 15, 1935. p. 9. 
  24. ^ "Long Declares He's in Race to Beat Roosevelt". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. August 13, 1935. p. 1. 
  25. ^ "Dazzy Vance 1935 Pitching Gamelogs". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 24, 2015. 
  26. ^ "Wiley Post And Will Rogers Killed In A Airplane Crash". AVStop. Retrieved July 24, 2015. 
  27. ^ "Canadian Parliaments since 1867". Elections Canada. Retrieved July 24, 2015. 
  28. ^ "Chronology 1935". indiana.edu. 2002. Retrieved July 24, 2015. 
  29. ^ "Emperor Offers to Let Il Duce Exploit Ethiopia". Chicago Daily Tribune. August 17, 1935. p. 5. 
  30. ^ "It's War! Mussolini's Edict". Chicago Daily Tribune. August 19, 1935. p. 1. 
  31. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (August 19, 1935). "Nazi Economic Chief Assails Jew Baiters". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  32. ^ "Tageseinträge für 19. August 1935". chroniknet. Retrieved July 24, 2015. 
  33. ^ "Ecuador Army Jails President and His 3 Aids". Chicago Daily Tribune. August 21, 1935. p. 8. 
  34. ^ a b "Tageseinträge für 20. August 1935". chroniknet. Retrieved July 24, 2015. 
  35. ^ "Senate Passes U. S. Neutrality Bill; Mussolini Supported by Austria". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. August 21, 1935. p. 1. 
  36. ^ Birchard, Robert (2004). Cecil B. DeMille's Hollywood. University Press of Kentucky. p. 292. ISBN 978-0-8131-2636-4. 
  37. ^ "Italy Threatens Britain as London Seeks Curb". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. August 22, 1935. p. 1. 
  38. ^ "British Ships to Guard Suez". Chicago Daily Tribune. August 24, 1935. p. 1. 
  39. ^ "Four Czarist Eagles Ordered Off Kremlin by Dictator Stalin". Chicago Daily Tribune. August 24, 1935. p. 1. 
  40. ^ "Ethiopia Orders Capital Evacuated". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. August 24, 1935. p. 1. 
  41. ^ Henning, Arthur Sears (August 26, 1935). "Warns Russia to Stop Plots". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  42. ^ "Tageseinträge für 26. August 1935". chroniknet. Retrieved July 24, 2015. 
  43. ^ Henning, Arthur Sears (August 27, 1935). "Congress Expires 'in Agony'". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  44. ^ "Russia Rejects U.S. Protest on Red Activities". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. August 27, 1935. p. 1. 
  45. ^ "Britons Censor U. S. Weeklu for Royalty 'Insult'". Chicago Daily Tribune. August 28, 1935. p. 5. 
  46. ^ "The Sovereign Pontiff on Italy and Abyssinia". The Tablet. August 31, 1935. Retrieved July 24, 2015. 
  47. ^ "Austrian Leader Goes on Trial as Dollfuss Killer". Chicago Daily Tribune. August 29, 1935. p. 4. 
  48. ^ "British Rulers Announce Third Son's Betrothal". Chicago Daily Tribune. August 30, 1935. p. 5. 
  49. ^ "Soft Coal Rule Bill is Signed by Roosevelt". Chicago Daily Tribune. August 31, 1935. p. 1. 
  50. ^ McCauley, Martin (1997). Who's Who in Russia since 1900. Routledge. p. 199. ISBN 978-0-415-13897-0. 
  51. ^ Zemtsov, Ilya (2001). Encyclopedia of the Soviet Union. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Transaction Publishers. p. 313. ISBN 978-1-4128-2256-5. 
  52. ^ "This Day in History – FDR Signs Neutrality Act". History. A&E Networks. Retrieved July 24, 2015. 
  53. ^ "1935 MLB No-Hitters". ESPN. Retrieved July 24, 2015. 
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