Asashio Tarō III

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Asashio Tarō III
朝潮 太郎
Shōnen Magazine first issue.jpg
Personal information
Born Fumitoshi Yonekawa
(1929-11-13)November 13, 1929
Hyōgo, Japan
Died October 23, 1988(1988-10-23) (aged 58)
Height 1.88 m (6 ft 2 in)
Weight 135 kg (298 lb)
Career
Stable Takasago
Record 497-269-101
Debut October, 1948
Highest rank Yokozuna (March, 1959)
Retired January, 1962
Championships 5 (Makuuchi)
1 (Jūryō)
Special Prizes Outstanding Performance (4)
Gold Stars 7
Chiyonoyama (3)
Haguroyama
Yoshibayama
Tochinishiki
Kagamisato
* Up to date as of Sep. 2012.

Asashio Tarō III (朝潮 太郎, November 13, 1929 – October 23, 1988) was a sumo wrestler from Kobe, Hyogo, Japan (born on Tokushima in the Amami Islands). He was the sport's 46th yokozuna. He was also a sumo coach and head of Takasago stable.

Career

Making his professional debut in October 1948, he at first fought under his own surname of Yonekawa. In September 1950 he reached the second highest jūryō division and won the championship at his first attempt with a 14–1 record. This earned him immediate promotion to the top makuuchi division in January 1951. He adopted the shikona or ring name of Asashio ("morning tide") in 1952. In his early career he earned seven kinboshi or gold stars for defeating yokozuna, three of them coming in one tournament in January 1955 when he beat Yoshibayama on Day 5 and then Chiyonoyama and Tochinishiki on Days 8 and 9.[1]

Asashio won five top division tournament championships, all but one of them in Osaka.[2] He won this tournament three years in a row from 1956 to 1958. His first title was won at sekiwake rank in a three way playoff that also involved future yokozuna Wakanohana Kanji I and maegashira Wakahaguro.[2] He earned promotion to ōzeki a year later after winning his second championship. In November 1958 he won the tournament in Kyūshū with a 14–1 record. After runner-up honours in the next two tournaments he was finally promoted to yokozuna at nearly 30 years of age. His time at sumo's highest rank was difficult as he missed many bouts through injury. He had to sit out the three tournaments following his yokozuna debut and was only able to win one further tournament, in March 1961. He did not take part in the January 1962 tournament and announced his retirement at the age of 32.

Retirement from sumo

Asashio remained in the sumo world as an elder under the name of Furiwake, and became head coach of Takasago stable in 1971 after the death of the previous stablemaster, former yokozuna Maedayama. As Takasago-oyakata he coached Asashio Tarō IV and Konishiki to the rank of ōzeki. He predicted that Konishiki would reach the rank of yokozuna before his 25th birthday, but it did not happen.[3] He also recruited the Samoan wrestler Nankairyū but after a heated argument with Takasago, Nankairyū ran away from the stable in September 1988.[4] Takasago died of a stroke a few weeks later.

Pre-modern top division record

  • The New Year tournament began and the Spring tournament returned to Osaka in 1953.
Asashio Tarō[5]
- Spring
Haru basho, Tokyo
Summer
Natsu basho, Tokyo
Autumn
Aki basho, Tokyo
1951 West Maegashira #20
8–7
 
East Maegashira #19
7–8
 
East Maegashira #20
10–5
 
1952 East Maegashira #13
10–5
 
East Maegashira #7
8–7
 
West Maegashira #2
10–5
O
- New Year
Hatsu basho, Tokyo
Spring
Haru basho, Osaka
Summer
Natsu basho, Tokyo
Autumn
Aki basho, Tokyo
1953 East Sekiwake #1
11–4
O
East Sekiwake #1
10–5
 
West Sekiwake #1
8–7
 
East Sekiwake #1
7–8
 
1954 West Komusubi #2
8–7
 
East Komusubi #1
8–7
 
West Komusubi #1
8–7
 
East Komusubi #1
6–9
 
1955 East Maegashira #1
8–7
O
East Maegashira #1
10–5
East Komusubi #1
8–7
 
West Komusubi #1
9–6
 
1956 West Sekiwake #1
9–6
 
East Sekiwake #1
12–3–P
O
East Sekiwake #1
8–7
 
East Sekiwake #1
8–7
 
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Top Division Runner-up Retired Lower Divisions

Sanshō key: F=Fighting spirit; O=Outstanding performance; T=Technique     Also shown: =Kinboshi(s); P=Playoff(s)
Divisions: MakuuchiJūryōMakushitaSandanmeJonidanJonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks: YokozunaŌzekiSekiwakeKomusubiMaegashira

Modern top division record

  • Since the addition of the Kyushu tournament in 1957 and the Nagoya tournament in 1958, the yearly schedule has remained unchanged.
Year in sumo January
Hatsu basho, Tokyo
March
Haru basho, Osaka
May
Natsu basho, Tokyo
July
Nagoya basho, Nagoya
September
Aki basho, Tokyo
November
Kyūshū basho, Fukuoka
1957 East Sekiwake #1
8–7
 
West Sekiwake #1
13–2
 
West Ōzeki #1
9–6
 
Not held West Ōzeki #1
11–4
 
West Ōzeki #1
10–5
 
1958 West Ōzeki #1
10–5
 
East Ōzeki #1
13–2–P
 
East Ōzeki #1
5–4–6
 
West Ōzeki #1
10–5
 
West Ōzeki #1
11–4
 
West Ōzeki #1
14–1
 
1959 East Ōzeki #1
11–4
 
East Ōzeki #1
13–2
 
West Yokozuna #1
10–5
 
East Yokozuna #2
Sat out due to injury
0–0–15
East Yokozuna #2
Sat out due to injury
0–0–15
East Yokozuna #2
Sat out due to injury
0–0–15
1960 East Yokozuna #2
11–4
 
West Yokozuna #1
4–6–5
 
East Yokozuna #2
10–5
 
West Yokozuna
9–6
 
West Yokozuna
11–4
 
East Yokozuna
11–4
 
1961 East Yokozuna #1
9–6
 
West Yokozuna #1
13–2
 
East Yokozuna #1
0–4–11
 
West Yokozuna #1
12–3
 
East Yokozuna #1
0–4–11
 
West Yokozuna #2
2–5–8
 
1962 West Yokozuna #2
Retired
0–0
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Top Division Runner-up Retired Lower Divisions

Sanshō key: F=Fighting spirit; O=Outstanding performance; T=Technique     Also shown: =Kinboshi(s); P=Playoff(s)
Divisions: MakuuchiJūryōMakushitaSandanmeJonidanJonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks: YokozunaŌzekiSekiwakeKomusubiMaegashira

See also

References

  1. ^ Asashio's January 1955 tournament record from Sumo Reference
  2. ^ a b "The Yokozuna: A Retrospective". Japan Sumo Association. Archived from the original on 2008-06-25. Retrieved 2008-05-02. 
  3. ^ Patmore, Angela (1990). The Giants of Sumo. MacDonald & Co. ISBN 0-356-18120-0. 
  4. ^ Sharnoff, Lora (1993). Grand Sumo. Weatherhill. ISBN 0-8348-0283-X. 
  5. ^ "Asashio Taro Rikishi Information". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 2007-07-26. 

External links

  • Japan Sumo Association profile


Preceded by
Wakanohana Kanji I
46th Yokozuna
1959–1962
Succeeded by
Kashiwado Tsuyoshi
Yokozuna is not a successive rank, and more than one wrestler can share the title
Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Asashio_Tarō_III&oldid=795952937"
This content was retrieved from Wikipedia : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asashio_Tarō_III
This page is based on the copyrighted Wikipedia article "Asashio Tarō III"; it is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-SA). You may redistribute it, verbatim or modified, providing that you comply with the terms of the CC-BY-SA