Arthur Perowne

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Arthur Perowne
Bishop of Worcester
Diocese Diocese of Worcester
In office 1931–1941
Predecessor Ernest Pearce
Successor William Wilson Cash
Other posts Archdeacon of Plymouth (&c.; 1918–1920)
Bishop of Bradford (1920–1931)
Orders
Ordination 1893 (deacon); 1894 (priest)
by his father
Consecration 1920
by Cosmo Gordon Lang
Personal details
Born (1867-06-13)13 June 1867
Died 9 April 1948(1948-04-09) (aged 80)
Gloucester, Gloucestershire, United Kingdom
Nationality British
Denomination Anglican
Parents John Perowne & Anne Woolrych
Spouse 1) Helena Oldnall Russell (m. 1895; she d. 1922)
2) Mabel Bailey (m. 1926; wid. 1948)
Children 3 sons, incl. Stewart
Alma mater King's College, Cambridge

Arthur William Thomson Perowne (13 June 1867 – 9 April 1948) was an Anglican bishop in Britain. He was the first Bishop of Bradford and, from 1931, was the Bishop of Worcester.[1]

Birth family and education

Perowne was born into a distinguished ecclesiastical family: he was the fourth son of John Perowne, sometime Bishop of Worcester and Anna Woolrych,[1] his uncles Thomas and Edward were Archdeacon of Norwich and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cambridge respectively and his first-cousin Thomas also Archdeacon of Norwich. He was educated at Haileybury and Imperial Service College and King's College, Cambridge (he was admitted 4 October 1886, matriculated that Michaelmas, and gained the degrees of Bachelor of Arts {BA, 1889}, Cambridge Master of Arts {MA(Cantab), 1893}, and Doctor of Divinity {DD, 1920}).[2][3]

Priest

Having been assistant master at Magdalen College Choir School, Oxford since 1890, Perowne was ordained a deacon on Trinity Sunday (28 May) 1893[4] and a priest on Trinity Sunday (20 May) 1894 (both times by his father, the Bishop of Worcester, in Worcester Cathedral),[5] beginning his ministry with his title post as a curate at Hartlebury, Worcestershire[6] (being also a chaplain to his father, the Bishop).[1] His first incumbency was as Vicar of St Philip & St James, Hallow, Worcestershire (1901–1904),[2] after which he became Vicar of St George's Edgbaston, Warwickshire from 1904, Rural Dean of Edgbaston[7] from 1905 and an honorary canon of Birmingham Cathedral from 1912.

In 1913, he left all three posts in Warks for Devon, where he became Vicar of St Andrew's, Plymouth; he became additionally Rural Dean for the Three Towns (i.e. the wider Borough of Plymouth), 1914–1918, a Prebendary of Exeter Cathedral from 1917, Archdeacon of Plymouth from 1918, and a Chaplain to the King from 1918, remaining as Vicar of Plymouth throughout, until he relinquished them all in 1920.[2]

Bishop

His appointment to become Bishop of Bradford, the first bishop diocesan of the new Diocese of Bradford, was announced on 12 December 1919,[8] and he was ordained and consecrated a bishop by Cosmo Gordon Lang, Archbishop of York, at York Minster on Candlemas (2 February) 1910.[9] He was translated to become Bishop of Worcester (in which See his father had served until 1901) in 1931[10] and retired in 1941.[2]

Marriages, family and death

In 1895, he married Helena Frances Oldnall-Russell (1869–1922). They had three sons:[2] Francis Edward Perowne (1898–1988), Stewart Perowne, a diplomat, archaeologist and historian, and Leslie Arthur Perowne (1906–1997), sometime Head of Music at the BBC, who was responsible for bringing Albert Ketèlbey out of retirement to conduct a huge BBC Ketèlbey Concert at the Royal Albert Hall, prior to World War II.

A keen fisherman,[1] he lived retirement in Gloucester (where he died)[11] with his second wife, Mabel (1886–1968), the second daughter of Thomas Henry Bailey of Wyldcroft in Wokingham, whom he had married in 1926.[2]

Family tree

References

  1. ^ a b c d Perowne, Arthur William Thomson. ukwhoswho.com. Who Was Who. 1920–2016 (April 2014 online ed.). A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc. Retrieved 16 April 2017.  closed access publication – behind paywall
  2. ^ a b c d e f "Perowne, Arthur William Thomson (PRWN886AW)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge. 
  3. ^ University Intelligence. Oxford. Feb. 4. (Official Appointments and Notices) The Times, Monday 6 February 1893; p. 8; Issue 33867; col. D
  4. ^ "Ordinations on Trinity Sunday (Archived; subscription only)". Church Times (#1585). 9 June 1893. p. 619. ISSN 0009-658X. Retrieved 20 April 2017. (Subscription required (help)). 
  5. ^ "Ordinations on Sunday last (Archived; subscription only)". Church Times (#1635). 25 May 1894. p. 565. ISSN 0009-658X. Retrieved 20 April 2017. (Subscription required (help)). 
  6. ^ My ancestors
  7. ^ "St George's Church Edgbaston" 1838 – 1998 Harkness, J. C./Pinkess, J. R. H.: Birmingham, St George's Edgbaston PCC, July 1998
  8. ^ "First Bishop of Bradford: Appointment of the Archdeacon of Plymouth (Archived; subscription only)". Church Times (#2968). 12 December 1919. p. 567. ISSN 0009-658X. Retrieved 20 April 2017. (Subscription required (help)). 
  9. ^ "The See of Bradford: Consecration of the First Bishop (Archived; subscription only)". Church Times (#2976). 6 February 1920. p. 146. ISSN 0009-658X. Retrieved 20 April 2017. (Subscription required (help)). 
  10. ^ "New Bishop of Worcester", The Times, 9 February 1931, p. 12
  11. ^ "in memoriam: Arthur William Thomson Perowne, Bishop. (Archived; subscription only)". Church Times (#4445). 16 April 1948. p. 220. ISSN 0009-658X. Retrieved 20 April 2017. (Subscription required (help)). 

External links

Church of England titles
New diocese Bishop of Bradford
1920–1931
Succeeded by
Alfred Blunt
Preceded by
Ernest Pearce
Bishop of Worcester
1931–1941
Succeeded by
William Wilson Cash
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