Argentine units of measurement

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A number of different units of measurement were used in Argentina as its national system was derived from Spanish Castillian. The metric system was legally optional since 1863 and has been compulsory since 1887.[1][2]

Pre-metric units

A number of different units were used before 1887.[1]

Length

A number of different units were used to measure length. These units were vary from one province or city to another.[1] In the province of Buenos Aires, one vara was 0.8666 m.[1][3] Some other units used in the province of Buenos Aires are given below:[1][3]

1 linéa = 1/432 vara

1 pulgada = 1/86 vara

1 palmas = 1/4 vara [4]

1 pié = 1/3 vara

1 braza = 2 vara

1 cuadra = 150 vara

1 legua = 6000 vara.

Railway measures

There were some other units used on the railways. One legua was equal to 600 varas (0.3231 mile). Milla was equal to 1.85 km (1.149 miles) [4]

Mass

Different units were used to measure length. These units were vary from one province or city to another and, in the province of Buenos Aires, one libra was equal to 459.4 g while one "libra de farmacia" was equal to 3/4 libra or 344.5 g. Some other units in the province of Buenos Aires are provided below:[1]

1 grano = 1/9216 libra

1 adarme = 1/256 libra

1 onza = 1/16 libra

1 Arroba = 25 libra [4][5]

1 Quintal = 100 libra[4][5]

1 Tonelada = 2000 libra.[4][5]

Marco used for gold and silver was equal to 3544.4 grains.[4]

Capacity

Dry and liquid units were used for capacity.[1][5] These units were vary from one province or city to another.[1][5]

Dry

1 fanega = 137.1977 l

1 Cuartilla =1/4 Fanega

1 Tonelada = 7 Fanega

1 Lastre = 12 Fanega.[4][5]

Liquid

Units included:[5]

1 Frasco = 2.375 l

1 Octava = 1/8 Frasco

1 Cuarta = 1/4 Frasco

1 Baril = 32 Frasco[4][5]

1 Cuerta = 48 Frasco

1 Pipa = 192 Frasco.

Units after metric adoption

Although theoretically the metric system was compulsory, a survey in 1920 revealed the widespread use of both traditional Spanish units and US customary units (particularly in trade with the USA).[6]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h Washburn, E.W. (1926). International Critical Tables of Numerical Data, Physics, Chemistry and Technology. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc. p. 2. 
  2. ^ Cardarelli, F. (2003). Encyclopaedia of Scientific Units, Weights and Measures. Their SI Equivalences and Origins. London: Springer. p. 7. ISBN 978-1-4471-1122-1. 
  3. ^ a b Cardarelli, F. (2003). Encyclopaedia of Scientific Units, Weights and Measures. Their SI Equivalences and Origins. London: Springer. p. 161. ISBN 978-1-4471-1122-1. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h Clarke, F.W. (1891). Weights Measures and Money of All Nations. New York: D. Appleton & Company. p. 10. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h Cardarelli, F. (2003). Encyclopaedia of Scientific Units, Weights and Measures. Their SI Equivalences and Origins. London: Springer. p. 162. ISBN 978-1-4471-1122-1. 
  6. ^ Stratton, S.W (1920), Weights and Measures: Twelfth Annual Conference from Various States Held at the Bureau of Standards, Washington: Government Printing Office, pp. 117, 118 
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