April 1944

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The following events occurred in April 1944:

April 1, 1944 (Saturday)

April 2, 1944 (Sunday)

April 3, 1944 (Monday)

April 4, 1944 (Tuesday)

April 5, 1944 (Wednesday)

April 6, 1944 (Thursday)

April 7, 1944 (Friday)

April 8, 1944 (Saturday)

April 9, 1944 (Sunday)

April 10, 1944 (Monday)

  • The RAF dropped a record 3,600 tons of bombs in a single raid on Germany, France and Belgium.[1]
  • General William Slim ordered a new offensive in Burma, calling for Stopford to break through to Kohima while the Imphal Garrison would make sorties into Japanese-held territory around them.[2]
  • During the Dnieper–Carpathian Offensive, the Soviet 3rd Ukrainian Front captured Odessa.[10]
  • German submarine U-68 was sunk in the Atlantic Ocean by U.S. aircraft.

April 11, 1944 (Tuesday)

April 12, 1944 (Wednesday)

April 13, 1944 (Thursday)

April 14, 1944 (Friday)

  • The Dnieper–Carpathian Offensive begun in December 1943 ended in Soviet victory.
  • The Battle of the Kamenets-Podolsky pocket ended with German tactical withdrawal.
  • The Bombay Explosion occurred in the Victoria Dock of Bombay when the freighter Fort Stikine caught fire and was destroyed in two giants blasts that killed about 800 people.
  • The Japanese roadblock to the west of Kohima was broken and the encircled British XXXIII Corps was relieved after a week.[2]
  • German submarine U-448 was depth charged and sunk northeast of the Azores by Allied warships.

April 15, 1944 (Saturday)

April 16, 1944 (Sunday)

  • Soviet forces cleared out the last pockets of German resistance at Yalta.[12]
  • The RAF made air raids on Romania for the first time, from bases in Italy.[1]
  • German submarine 'U-550 was sunk in the Atlantic Ocean by American warships.

April 17, 1944 (Monday)

April 18, 1944 (Tuesday)

April 19, 1944 (Wednesday)

April 20, 1944 (Thursday)

  • The RAF set a new record for a single air raid, dropping 4,500 tons of bombs for Hitler's 55th birthday.[1]
  • The American destroyer Lansdale and the Liberty ship SS Paul Hamilton were sunk off Algiers by the Luftwaffe.
  • Died: Elmer Gedeon, 27, American USAAF officer and one of only two major league baseball players killed in WWII (shot down over France)

April 21, 1944 (Friday)

April 22, 1944 (Saturday)

April 23, 1944 (Sunday)

  • Hollandia, New Guinea fell to the Americans without much fighting.[2]
  • Japanese destroyer Amagiri was sunk in the Makassar Strait by a naval mine.
  • The Salzburg conference between Hitler and Mussolini concluded. A compromise was reached in which Mussolini agreed to continue permitting Italian troops to be trained in Germany, with the best fighters allowed to form the nucleus of the new National Republican Army.[16]

April 24, 1944 (Monday)

April 25, 1944 (Tuesday)

  • Adolf Eichmann and the Nazis offered the Hungarian rescue worker Joel Brand the "Blood for Goods" deal, proposing that one million Jews be allowed to leave Hungary for any Allied-occupied country except Palestine, in exchange for goods obtained outside of Hungary. The deal would never be made because the Allies believed it to be a trick and the British press slammed it as blackmail.[18]
  • German submarine U-488 was depth charged and sunk in the Atlantic Ocean by U.S. warships.
  • On Budget Day in the United Kingdom, Chancellor of the Exchequer Sir John Anderson announced that the deficit for the past year was £2.76 billion. This was £89 million smaller than the deficit forecast by Anderson's predecessor, the late Kingsley Wood, because government revenue was higher than expected. Anderson presented a budget with only minor changes from the previous year and no additional taxation.[19]
  • The United Negro College Fund was founded in the United States.
  • Born: Len Goodman, ballroom dancer, dance judge and coach, in Wolverhampton, England
  • Died: George Herriman, 63, American cartoonist and creator of the Krazy Kat comic strip

April 26, 1944 (Wednesday)

April 27, 1944 (Thursday)

April 28, 1944 (Friday)

  • The first practice assault in Exercise Tiger, a series of large-scale rehearsals for D-Day, was held on Slapton Sands in Devon. The exercise was attacked by nine German E-boats that killed a total of 749 American servicemen. Two landing ships were sunk including USS LST-507.
  • Japanese cruiser Yūbari sank southwest of Palau the day after being torpedoed by the American submarine Bluegill.
  • Died: Frank Knox, 70, American newspaper editor, publisher and Secretary of the U.S. Navy

April 29, 1944 (Saturday)

April 30, 1944 (Sunday)

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i Mercer, Derrik, ed. (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. pp. 598–599. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Davidson, Edward; Manning, Dale (1999). Chronology of World War Two. London: Cassell & Co. pp. 187–189. ISBN 0-304-35309-4. 
  3. ^ a b c d "1944". MusicAndHistory. Retrieved March 1, 2016. [permanent dead link]
  4. ^ "War Diary for Tuesday, 4 April 1944". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  5. ^ "The First Allied Aerial Reconnaissance Over Auschwitz". World War II Today. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  6. ^ "War Diary for Wednesday, 5 April 1944". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  7. ^ "1944: Key Dates". United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  8. ^ "Conflict Timeline, March 28-April 6 1944". OnWar.com. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  9. ^ "War Diary for Friday, 7 April 1944". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  10. ^ "War Diary for Monday, 10 April 1944". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  11. ^ Chronology and Index of the Second World War, 1938–1945. Research Publications. 1990. p. 255. ISBN 978-0-88736-568-3. 
  12. ^ a b c "1944". World War II Database. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  13. ^ "War Diary for Tuesday, 18 April 1944". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  14. ^ "Boston Marathon Yearly Synopses (1897–2013)". John Hancock Financial. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  15. ^ "Why is Women's Suffrage in France Only 70 Years Old?". La Jeune Politique. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  16. ^ a b Corvaja, Santi (2008). Hitler & Mussolini: The Secret Meetings. New York: Enigma Books. pp. 280–281, 284. ISBN 978-1-929631-42-1. 
  17. ^ Urban, Joan Barth (1986). Moscow and the Italian Communist Party: From Togliatti to Berlinguer. London: I.B. Tarus & Co. p. 195. ISBN 978-1-85043-027-8. 
  18. ^ "The Nazis & the Jews: The 'Blood for Goods' Deal". Jewish Virtual Library. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  19. ^ "Britain's Tax Rates Stand". The Advertiser. Adelaide. p. 1. April 26, 1944. 
  20. ^ "Yoshida Maru". Shipwrecks. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  21. ^ "Quebec Disapproves Sending Men Abroad". Ottawa Citizen. Ottawa. p. 9. April 27, 1944. 
  22. ^ Lammers, Dirk (December 27, 2015). "Jim Tobin, threw no-no for Boston Braves, born 103 years ago today". NoNoHitters.com. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  23. ^ "Events occurring on Sunday, April 30, 1944". WW2 Timelines. 2011. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
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