Anthony Precourt

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Anthony Precourt
Born Jay Anthony Precourt Jr.
1969/1970 (age 47–48)[1]
Alma mater Pepperdine University (BA)
Dartmouth College Tuck School of Business (MBA)
Known for Owner of Columbus Crew SC
Spouse(s) Agatha Matosek
Children 3

Jay Anthony Precourt Jr.[2] (born c. 1969–70) is an American investor and sports team owner. He is the CEO of Precourt Sports Ventures, a group that owns the Columbus Crew SC of Major League Soccer. He is also a managing partner of Precourt Capital Management, a private investment management firm based in San Francisco, California.

Education and career

Precourt grew up in San Francisco, California,[3] and graduated from Pepperdine University with a Bachelor of Arts in political science and from the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College with a Master of Business Administration.[4] He entered the corporate finance business with stints at Merrill Lynch, Alex. Brown & Sons, and WHV Investment Management.[5] He founded his own private equity firm, Precourt Capital Management, in 2008, focusing on the energy sector.[4][5]

MLS ownership

Precourt, who had a stated interest in soccer, formed Precourt Sports Ventures LLC in 2012 and looked to invest in Major League Soccer.[6] The firm bought the Columbus Crew SC from Clark Hunt for $68 million, then a record for a MLS franchise.[3][7] At the first Crew match he attended, several months before the sale was finalized, the scoreboard at Mapfre Stadium caught fire and delayed kickoff for hours.[6][8] Under Precourt's ownership, the Crew hired Gregg Berhalter as its manager and first sporting director;[9] and unveiled an updated brand identity that included a new logo and name with the suffix "SC".[10]

On October 17, 2017, Precourt Sports Ventures announced that it was considering moving the franchise in 2019 to Austin, Texas, if a new downtown stadium could not be built.[11] The move had been planned by Precourt and the league for several months, but came as a surprise to Columbus leaders and fans.[12] Precourt became the target of anger from fans after offering an apology on Twitter,[13] culminating in chants and banners held by fans during the team's playoff matches.[14] During the offseason, Precourt unsuccessfully pursued several stadium sites in the Austin area, including a controversial proposal to build in part of Guerrero Park.[15][16]

Personal life

Precourt is a native of San Francisco, California,[3] and he lives with his wife Agatha and three children.[6] His father is Jay Precourt, a former oil executive.[2][4]

References

  1. ^ Bell, Jeff (July 30, 2013). "Columbus Crew sold to Precourt Sports Ventures, which pledges to keep team in Columbus". Columbus Business Journal. Retrieved December 11, 2017. 
  2. ^ a b "Alumnus Jay Precourt commits $30 million to fund energy efficiency institute". Stanford University. October 5, 2006. Retrieved December 11, 2017. 
  3. ^ a b c Jardy, Adam (July 30, 2013). "Crew under new ownership". The Columbus Dispatch. Retrieved December 11, 2017. 
  4. ^ a b c Anderson, Will (October 18, 2017). "Who is Anthony Precourt? Get to know the man who might bring an MLS team to Austin". Austin Business Journal. Retrieved December 11, 2017. 
  5. ^ a b "Anthony Precourt, Investor-Operator and Chairman - Columbus Crew SC and MAPFRE Stadium". Columbus Crew SC. Retrieved December 11, 2017. 
  6. ^ a b c Thomas, Ian (July 27, 2015). "Precourt takes thoughtful approach in remaking Crew". Sports Business Daily. p. 3. Retrieved December 11, 2017. 
  7. ^ Ozanian, Mike (August 1, 2013). "Columbus Crew Sold By Hunt Sports Group For Record $68 Million". Forbes. Retrieved December 11, 2017. 
  8. ^ McCarthy, Kyle (February 3, 2014). "Stoppage Time: Columbus chairman and investor/operator Anthony Precourt". Fox Sports. Retrieved December 11, 2017. 
  9. ^ Jardy, Adam (November 6, 2013). "Gregg Berhalter named coach". The Columbus Dispatch. Retrieved December 14, 2017. 
  10. ^ Abnos, Alexander (October 8, 2014). "Columbus Crew unveil new logo, brand identity at downtown event". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved December 14, 2017. 
  11. ^ Erickson, Andrew (October 18, 2017). "Without a Downtown stadium, Crew likely to bid adieu". The Columbus Dispatch. Retrieved December 11, 2017. 
  12. ^ Newpoff, Laura (October 18, 2017). "MLS, Crew SC have been working on Austin relocation plan for months". Columbus Business Journal. Retrieved December 11, 2017. 
  13. ^ Joseph, Andrew (October 19, 2017). "Furious Columbus Crew fans blast owner's Twitter apology for trying to move club". USA Today. Retrieved December 11, 2017. 
  14. ^ King, Andrew (November 1, 2017). "Columbus playoff triumph foreshadows an awkward 2018". FourFourTwo. Retrieved December 11, 2017. 
  15. ^ Lyttle, Kevin (March 1, 2018). "Statesman Exclusive: Precourt breaks silence on Austin MLS move". Austin American-Statesman. Retrieved March 11, 2018. 
  16. ^ Dart, Tom (February 21, 2018). "The Crew want to move to Austin – but does Austin want the Crew?". The Guardian. Retrieved March 11, 2018. 
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