Anisa Mohammed

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Anisa Mohammed
Refer to caption
Mohammed in November 2014
Personal information
Full name Anisa Mohammed
Born (1988-08-07) 7 August 1988 (age 29)
Sangre Grande, Trinidad and Tobago
Batting style Right-hand batsman
Bowling style Right-arm off break
Role Bowler
Relations Alisa Mohammed (twin sister)
International information
National side
ODI debut (cap 51) 26 July 2003 v Japan
Last ODI 6 July 2017 v New Zealand
ODI shirt no. 14
T20I debut (cap 3) 27 June 2008 v Ireland
Last T20I 22 November 2016 v India
T20I shirt no. 14
Career statistics
Competition WODI WT20I WLO WT20
Matches 108 89 113 95
Runs scored 466 132 515 174
Batting average 9.91 7.33 10.51 8.70
100s/50s 0/0 0/0 0/1 0/0
Top score 31* 20* 66 21
Balls bowled 4810 1,815 5,056 1,953
Wickets 143 104 146 116
Bowling average 18.83 15.49 18.66 14.72
5 wickets in innings 5 2 5 2
10 wickets in match 0 0 0 0
Best bowling 7/14 5/10 7/14 5/10
Catches/stumpings 36/– 21/– 39/– 22/–
Source: ESPNCricinfo, 6 July 2017

Anisa Mohammed (born 7 August 1988) is a Trinidadian cricketer. A right-arm off spin bowler, she has played for both the Trinidad and Tobago and the West Indies women's cricket teams. Since her international debut at 14 years of age she played in 101 women's One Day International (ODI) and 89 women's Twenty20 international (T20I) matches. She taken the most the wickets in women's T20Is, with 104, well ahead of everyone who has played in the international format. In women's ODIs, she is currently fifth on the all-time dismissals list with 134 wickets to her name.

Early life

Mohammed was born in Maraj Hill, Coalmine, a small village in Sangre Grande, Trinidad and Tobago. Her parent introduced her and her twin sister Alisa to the game of cricket. Taking to the game from a young age she was appointed captain of her local community team, the MAAAD Rangers, which was formed by her family. She was educated at the Sangre Grande Hindu School, the SWAHA Hindu College and the School of Continuing Studies, Trinidad and Tobago.

After good performances for the local club, she was called up the Trinidad and Tobago women's national cricket team.[1]

International career

Debut and earlier years

Mohammed made her One Day International debut in the West Indies' group stage match of the 2003 IWCC Trophy against Japan, becoming the 51st player to do so. Taking to field 12 days shy of her 15th birthday, Mohammed took the wicket of Ritsuko Hiroto to the finish the match with figures of 1/4 off her 10 overs.[2]

She was then selected for her first international tour when the West Indies toured India and Pakistan in 2003–04. In the seventh ODI against Pakistan at Asghar Ali Shah Cricket Stadium in Karachi, Mohammed took 2/17 in only her fourth international match.[3] She played in one match for the West Indies during the group stage of the 2005 Women's Cricket World Cup in South Africa against Ireland. Following both the West Indies and the host nation elimination, the teams played three ODIs in Pretoria where she failed to take a wicket in her two matches.[4]

Return from hiatus

It would be three years until the West Indies played another match due to a lack of funding by the WICB.[5] In June 2008, the West Indies returned to the international arena when they toured Europe.[6] During that tour, the West Indies contested their first Twenty20 International match, where they defeated Ireland by 75 runs.[7] Mohammed played in the match but didn't bat or bowl.[8] Her first wicket in the format would come just four days when the toured moved to the Netherlands in July. Taking figures of 4/20,[9] she collected her first the player of the match award.[10]

The 2009 Women's Cricket World Cup in Australia saw Mohammed play in all three group stage matches and two of the Super Sixes matches. She took a total of four wickets at an average of 34.00 in the tournament[11] where the West Indies finished in fifth place.[12] Following the World Cup, she toured to South Africa where at the Newlands Cricket Ground in Cape Town in the second T20I she took five wickets for just ten runs,[13] becoming only the third player to take a five-wicket haul in women's Twenty20 International cricket.[14]

2010 ICC Women's World Twenty20

In the leadup to the 2010 ICC Women's World Twenty20 hosted by the West Indies in May, Sri Lanka toured the host nation to play two ODIs and three T20Is.[15] In the first ODI at the St Paul's Sporting Complex in St Paul's, Mohammed received her first player of the match in the format. Coming to the crease with the score at 92 for 8 and chasing 133, Mohammed and Shanel Daley put together a 41-run ninth wicket partnership to steer the West Indies to victory with three balls to spare.[16] At the same venue two days later, Mohammed was named captain in place of the absent Merissa Aguilleira for the second ODI.[17] Unfortunately for Mohammed, she could not skipper her side to a series victory with Sri Lanka winning the match by 38 runs and drawing the series 1 all.[18] She went to captain the side again in third and final match of the T20I series.[19] In another player of the match performance, she took four wickets for nine runs, including the final wicket in the penultimate over to win match by 28 runs.[20] In the previous match, Mohammed took figures 4/26 becoming only player to take consecutive four-wicket hauls in women's T20Is.[21]

At the World Twenty20 event, Mohammed played in all three group stage matches and was named player of the match in the West Indies' two run victory over England where she bowled 2/9.[22] Her best figures in the tournament came in final group stage match against Australia where despite taking 3/17 and restricting the Southern Stars to 133, the West Indies were unable to run down the target and lost by nine runs.[23] The West Indies lost their semi final to New Zealand[24] and Mohammed finished the competition with a total of six wickets at an average of 11.83.[25]

Six months later in Potchefstroom, South Africa, Mohammed took part in the 2010 ICC Women's Cricket Challenge – a series of ODIs and T20Is matches contested by the West Indies, South Africa, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, the Netherlands and Ireland. In the ODI series, Mohammed played in all five matches where the West Indies finished second behind South Africa. She secured her second player of the match award in the format with figures of 4/26 in a match where the West Indies comfortably defeated Sri Lanka by nine wickets.[26][27] In the T20Is series, the West Indies won the final against Sri Lanka with Mohammed taking five wickets across the three matches.[28][29]

The West Indies finished the season by touring India in January 2011[30] where Mohammed was the West Indies leading wicket taking in the ODI series with eight and produced the best bowling figures with 4/27 in a series which India won 3–2.[31][32]

Pakistan's tour in 2011

The August–September 2011 Pakistan tour the West Indies saw Mohammed produce one of the most dominating performances in the women's game. In the opening game of the four match ODI series, Pakistan were rolled for 82 with Mohammed taking 5/5 from her 10 overs[33] – becoming the second West Indian bowler to take five-wicket hauls in a women's ODI match. Two days later, she produced another five-wicket haul, taking four of Pakistan's top six to finish with 5/7.[34] Both of these spells earned her player of the match honours.[26] In the final match she took 4/17 to finish the series with 14 wickets at average of just 3.57,[35] collecting her first player of the series award.

Her great form continued into the 2011 Women's Cricket World Cup Qualifier in Bangladesh two months later. She took her third five-wicket haul against Pakistan in as many matches. She was rested for the pool matches against Japan and Bangladesh before returning for the semi final match against Sri Lanka where she took 3/29 in 6 overs. Mohammed produced one of the most memorable cricketing performances in the final against Pakistan where she took 7 wickets for 14 runs – the fourth best bowling figures in history of women's ODI cricket. Winning by 130 runs, the West Indies finished the tournament undefeated and qualified for the 2013 Women's Cricket World Cup.[36] She finished 2011 with 37 ODI wickets, the most in a calendar year, overtaking Australia's Charmaine Mason long standing record set in 2000.[a][37]

Five-wicket hauls

Mohammed has taken a total of seven five-wicket hauls in women's international cricket, five in ODIs[38] and two in T20Is.[39] She is the only player to achieve either of these feats.[40][41]

One Day Internationals

No Opponent Venue Date Figures Result Ref
1  Pakistan Arnos Vale Stadium, Kingstown 28 August 2011 5/5 (10 overs) Won by 8 wickets [42]
2  Pakistan Arnos Vale Stadium, Kingstown 30 August 2011 5/7 (10 overs) Won by 89 runs [43]
3  Pakistan Bangladesh Krira Shikkha Protisthan No 2 Ground, Dhaka 17 November 2011 5/26 (10 overs) Won by 8 wickets [44]
4  Pakistan Sher-e-Bangla National Cricket Stadium, Dhaka 26 November 2011 7/14 (8.3 overs) Won by 130 runs [45]
5  Sri Lanka Kensington Oval, Bridgetown 25 April 2012 5/34 (9.3 overs) Won by 88 runs [46]

Twenty20 Internationals

No Opponent Venue Date Figures Result Ref
1  South Africa Newlands Cricket Ground, Cape Town 26 October 2009 5/10 (4 overs) Won by 13 runs [47]
2  New Zealand Kensington Oval, Bridgetown 14 October 2013 5/12 (4 overs) Won by 23 runs [48]

Awards

Mohammed has been named the Trinidad and Tobago Women's Cricketer of the Year on three occasions, in 2003, 2008 and 2010.[1] At the inaugural Trinidad and Tobago Spirit of Sports Awards in 2011, she was named the most consistent performer, the breakthrough athlete and was recognised as having the record breaking performance of the year.[49]

Mohammed has been named player of the match ten times during her ODI career[26] and five times during her T20I career.[50] She was also named the player of the series twice, both in home ODI series.[51]

One Day Internationals

Player of the series awards

# Series Season Match Performance Result Ref
1 Pakistan in the West Indies 2011 14 wickets at average of 3.57; 34 runs (4 matches) Won the series 3–1 [52]
2 New Zealand in the West Indies 2014 12 wickets at average of 8.75; 3 runs (4 matches) Won the series 4–0 [53]

Player of the match awards

No Opponent Venue Date Match Performance Result Ref
1  Sri Lanka St Paul's Sporting Complex, St Paul's 18 April 2010 1/24 (9 overs); 15* Won by 2 wickets [54]
2  Sri Lanka North West University No 1 Ground, Potchefstroom 9 October 2010 4/26 (10 overs); DNB Won by 9 wickets [55]
3  Pakistan Arnos Vale Stadium, Kingstown 28 August 2011 5/5 (10 overs); DNB Won by 8 wickets [42]
4  Pakistan Arnos Vale Stadium, Kingstown 30 August 2011 5/7 (10 overs); 9 runs Won by 89 runs [43]
5  Pakistan Arnos Vale Stadium, Kingstown 3 September 2011 4/17 (6.2 overs); 25* Won by 50 runs [56]
6  Pakistan Bangladesh Krira Shikkha Protisthan No 2 Ground, Dhaka 17 November 2011 5/26 (10 overs); DNB Won by 8 wickets [44]
7  Pakistan Sher-e-Bangla National Cricket Stadium, Dhaka 26 November 2011 7/14 (8.3 overs); DNB Won by 130 runs [45]
8  New Zealand Brabourne Stadium, Mumbai 11 February 2013 1/13 (8.3 overs); 31* Won by 48 runs [57]
9  New Zealand Warner Park, Basseterre 19 September 2014 4/41 (10 overs); 3 runs Won by 4 runs [58]
10  Pakistan Darren Sammy National Cricket Stadium, Gros Islet 18 October 2015 2/24 (7.1 overs); 19* Won by 3 wickets [59]

Twenty20 Internationals

Player of the match awards

No Opponent Venue Date Match Performance Result Ref
1  Netherlands Sportpark Maarschalkerweerd, Utrecht 1 July 2008 4/20 (4 overs); DNB Won by 7 wickets [60]
2  South Africa Newlands Cricket Ground, Cape Town 26 October 2009 5/10 (4 overs); DNB Won by 13 runs [47]
3  Sri Lanka St Mary's Park, Cayon 24 April 2010 4/9 (3.2 overs); 5 runs Won by 28 runs [61]
4  England Warner Park, Basseterre 7 May 2010 2/9 (4 overs); DNB Won by 2 runs [22]
5  New Zealand Kensington Oval, Bridgetown 14 October 2013 5/12 (4 overs); DNB Won by 23 runs [48]

Notes

  1. ^ Suné Luus of South Africa equalled the record of 37 wickets in 2016.[37]

References

  1. ^ a b "Profile of Anisa Mohammed". National Sporting Archives of Trinidad and Tobago. Retrieved 10 January 2017. 
  2. ^ "International Women's Cricket Council Trophy, 14th Match: Japan Women v West Indies Women at Amstelveen, Jul 26, 2003". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 10 January 2017. 
  3. ^ "West Indies Women tour of Pakistan, 7th ODI: Pakistan Women v West Indies Women at Karachi, Apr 2, 2004". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 10 January 2017. 
  4. ^ "List of One Day International matches played by Anisa Mohammed". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 10 January 2017. 
  5. ^ Thompson, Jenny (11 May 2007). "West Indies board "killing women's cricket"". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 10 January 2017. 
  6. ^ "George looks forward to Europe tour". ESPNcricinfo. 21 June 2008. Retrieved 10 January 2017. 
  7. ^ "Taylor powers West Indies to convincing win". ESPNcricinfo. 27 June 2008. Retrieved 10 January 2017. 
  8. ^ "West Indies Women tour of Ireland, Only T20I: Ireland Women v West Indies Women at Dublin, Jun 27, 2008". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 10 January 2017. 
  9. ^ "Mohammed and King star for West Indies". ESPNcricinfo. 1 July 2008. Retrieved 10 January 2017. 
  10. ^ "West Indies Women tour of Netherlands, 1st T20I: Netherlands Women v West Indies Women at Utrecht, Jul 1, 2008". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 10 January 2017. 
  11. ^ "Bowling figures for Anisa Mohammed at the 2009 Women's Cricket World Cup". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 10 January 2017. 
  12. ^ Roesler, Jenny (21 March 2009). "Aguilleira calls on West Indies board for more matches". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 10 January 2017. 
  13. ^ "Mohammed's five derails South Africa". ESPNcricinfo. 26 October 2009. Retrieved 10 January 2017. 
  14. ^ "List of five-wicket hauls in women's T20Is matches". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 10 January 2017. 
  15. ^ "Sri Lanka Women tour of West Indies in 2010". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 10 January 2017. 
  16. ^ "Mohammed and Daley seal tense win for Windies". ESPNcricinfo. 18 April 2010. Retrieved 13 February 2017. 
  17. ^ "List of women's ODI matches captained by Anisa Mohammed". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 13 February 2017. 
  18. ^ "de Alwis helps Sri Lanka square series". ESPNcricinfo. 21 April 2010. Retrieved 13 February 2017. 
  19. ^ "List of women's T20I matches captained by Anisa Mohammed". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 13 February 2017. 
  20. ^ "Sri Lanka Women tour of West Indies, 3rd T20I: West Indies Women v Sri Lanka Women at Cayon, Apr 24, 2010". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 13 February 2017. 
  21. ^ Khan, Nasser (22 April 2012). "Anisa Mohammed Ace Windies Cricketer". Trinidad and Tobago Guardian. Port of Spain: Guardian Media Limited. Retrieved 10 January 2017. 
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  24. ^ English, Peter (14 May 2010). "McGlashan fires New Zealand into final". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 14 February 2017. 
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  34. ^ "Pakistan crumble again to Mohammed five-for". ESPNcricinfo. 30 August 2011. Retrieved 16 February 2017. 
  35. ^ "Bowling figures for Anisa Mohammed in the Pakistan Women in the West Indies ODI series in 2011". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 16 February 2017. 
  36. ^ "West Indies take title with thumping win". ESPNcricinfo. 26 November 2011. Retrieved 16 February 2017. 
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  41. ^ "List of players who haven taken two or more five-wicket hauls in women's Twenty20 International cricket". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 10 January 2017. 
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  43. ^ a b "Pakistan Women tour of West Indies, 2nd ODI: West Indies Women v Pakistan Women at Kingstown, Aug 30, 2011". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 10 January 2017. 
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  49. ^ "Baptiste, Mohammed star at sport awards". Trinidad and Tobago Guardian. Port of Spain: Guardian Media Limited. 30 December 2011. Retrieved 10 January 2017. 
  50. ^ "List of Twenty20 Internationals player of the match awards for Anisa Mohammed". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 10 January 2017. 
  51. ^ "List of One Day Internationals player of the series awards for Anisa Mohammed". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 10 January 2017. 
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  53. ^ "New Zealand Women in West Indies ODI Series". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 10 January 2017. 
  54. ^ "Sri Lanka Women tour of West Indies, 1st ODI: West Indies Women v Sri Lanka Women at Basseterre, Apr 18, 2010". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 10 January 2017. 
  55. ^ "ICC Women's Cricket Challenge, 9th Match: Sri Lanka Women v West Indies Women at Potchefstroom (Uni), Oct 9, 2010". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 10 January 2017. 
  56. ^ "Pakistan Women tour of West Indies, 4th ODI: West Indies Women v Pakistan Women at Kingstown, Sep 3, 2011". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 10 January 2017. 
  57. ^ "ICC Women's World Cup, 18th Match, Super Six: New Zealand Women v West Indies Women at Mumbai (BS), Feb 11, 2013". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 10 January 2017. 
  58. ^ "New Zealand Women tour of West Indies, 4th ODI: West Indies Women v New Zealand Women at Basseterre, Sep 19, 2014". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 10 January 2017. 
  59. ^ "ICC Women's Championship, 2nd ODI: West Indies Women v Pakistan Women at Gros Islet, Oct 18, 2015". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 10 January 2017. 
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External links

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