American Board of Nuclear Medicine

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American Board of Nuclear Medicine
Copy-ABNMshieldText400by911.png
Founded July 28, 1971; 47 years ago (1971-07-28)[1]
13-2690306[2]
Legal status 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization[3]
Headquarters St. Louis, Missouri[2]
Daniel Pryma, M.D.[4]
George Segall, M.D.[4]
Revenue (2015)
$1,098,897[2]
Expenses (2015) $925,158[2]
Website www.abnm.org

The American Board of Nuclear Medicine (ABNM) certifies physicians as specialists in the practice of nuclear medicine. Diplomates of the ABNM are called nuclear medicine physicians. The ABNM is one of the 24 member boards of the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS).

Nuclear medicine procedures use the tracer principle, most often radioactive tracers called radiopharmaceuticals, to evaluate molecular, metabolic, physiologic, and pathologic conditions for diagnosis, therapy, and research. Nuclear medicine procedures are the major clinical applications of molecular imaging and molecular therapy.

Mission statement

The American Board of Nuclear Medicine is the primary certifying organization for nuclear medicine in the United States. The Board serves the public through assurance of high quality patient care by establishing standards of training, initial certification, and continuing competence of physicians providing nuclear medicine diagnostic and therapeutic services.[5]

History

Certification

A physician certified by the American Board of Nuclear Medicine has

  1. a valid license to practice medicine,
  2. successfully completed training in an Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) approved residency program,
  3. been evaluated by the director of the training program and found competent in clinical nuclear medicine, and
  4. passed a secure computer-based examination encompassing the medical uses of radioactive materials and related sciences.[7]

The American Board of Medical Specialties has a free website where certification of physicians can be confirmed, and where certified physicians can be found by geographic location.

Maintenance of certification

Maintenance of Certification (MOC) is a program of continuing education and evaluation for the diplomates of all member boards of the American Board of Medical Specialties.[8] Initial certification documents a physicians initial competence; Maintenance of Certification documents a commitment to remaining up-to-date. The American Board of Nuclear Medicine's MOC program has four parts.[9]

  1. Professional standing. Evidence of professional standing is provided by maintain unrestricted license(s) to practice medicine.
  2. Lifelong learning and self-assessment. Diplomates must document participation in continuing medical education and must take part in self-assessment activities that are qualified by the ABNM.
  3. Cognitive expertise. Either a secure, reliable, and valid exam must be successfully passed each 10 years, or diplomates must participate in CertLink.
  4. Performance in practice evaluation. A continuing process of evaluation, improvement, and reevaluation must be applied by each diplomates to his/her own practice.

CertLink™

The CertLink pilot[10] will provide ABNM diplomates with questions to answer on a regular basis. After answering the question, the diplomates will receive feedback – the correct answer, a brief explanation, and literature references. The pilot has been designed using cognitive physiology principles to provide continuing medical education at the same time as the diplomate demonstrates continuing expertise.

Components of professional competence

Nuclear medicine is a technology embedded medical specialty depending upon

The components of professional competence for nuclear medicine physicians include a basic understanding of all of these underlying sciences as well as a thorough understanding of their medical application.[11] The program requirements for nuclear medicine residencies also include all of these elements.[12]

Related organizations

The American Board of Nuclear Medicine certifies individual nuclear medicine physicians. The nuclear medicine review committee[13] of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education[14] (ACGME) certifies nuclear medicine residency training programs. The Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI),[15] the major nuclear medicine scientific and professional organization, provides continuing education and self-assessment modules that can be used to fulfill the lifelong learning and self-assessment requirement of MOC, and the SNMMI is developing material for performance in practice evaluation. Additionally, the American Osteopathic Board of Nuclear Medicine is responsible for certification of osteopathic nuclear medicine physicians.

The American College of Nuclear Physicians (ACNP) represents the practice and socio-economic interests of those engaged in the use of radionuclides.[16]

A closely related board, the American Board of Radiology (ABR), is another member of the American Board of Medical Specialties. The ABR certifies radiologists who also practice nuclear medicine.

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) or associated state regulatory agencies oversee radiation safety associated with radioactive, by-product material. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) oversees the radiopharmaceuticals used by nuclear medicine.

See also

References

  1. ^ "The American Board of Nuclear Medicine, Inc." Division of Corporations. Delaware Department of State. Retrieved October 14, 2017.
  2. ^ a b c d e "Form 990: Return of Organization Exempt from Income Tax". American Board of Nuclear Medicine. Guidestar. December 31, 2015.
  3. ^ "American Board of Nuclear Medicine Inc." Exempt Organization Select Check. Internal Revenue Service. Retrieved October 14, 2017.
  4. ^ a b "Board Members". American Board of Nuclear Medicine. Retrieved October 14, 2017.
  5. ^ "Mission Statement, American Board of Nuclear Medicine". Archived from the original on 2007-08-07. Retrieved 2008-12-20.
  6. ^ Ross JF: A history of the American Board of Nuclear Medicine. Semin Nucl Med. 1996 Jul;26(3):191-193. PMID 8829280.
  7. ^ "ABNM brochure" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2007-07-01. Retrieved 2008-12-20.
  8. ^ ABMS Maintenance of Certification program
  9. ^ "ABNM Maintenance of Certification program". Archived from the original on 2009-02-21. Retrieved 2008-12-20.
  10. ^ MOC Assessment
  11. ^ Alavi A, Blahd WH, DeNardo SJ, et al. J Nucl Med 2003; 44:988-990. PMID 12791830
  12. ^ "Nuclear medicine residency program requirements". Archived from the original on 2009-01-06. Retrieved 2008-12-20.
  13. ^ "Nuclear medicine residency review committee of the ACGME". Archived from the original on 2008-12-20. Retrieved 2008-12-20.
  14. ^ Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education
  15. ^ The Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
  16. ^ American College of Nuclear Physicians

External links

  • Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)
    • List of ACGME Accredited Programs
  • American Board of Nuclear Medicine
  • American Board of Medical Specialties
  • Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
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