All-Ireland Junior Football Championship

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
All-Ireland Junior Football Championship
Irish Craobh Sóisear Peile na hÉireann
Founded 1912
Title holders Kerry (19th title)
First winner Tipperary
Most titles Kerry (19 titles)

The All-Ireland Junior Football Championship is a GAA competition for junior Gaelic football inter-county teams in Ireland. The definition of what constitutes a junior player differs from county to county. In some, the junior team is the second team after the senior team. This means that any players who have not played with the senior team can play with the junior team. In others, such as Cork and Kerry, players can only be chosen from clubs that play in junior or intermediate grades. These counties cannot choose players from senior clubs, even if they are not on the senior county team. When a team wins this championship, it has to pick a new team for the following year. No player can thus be on a winning team for two successive years. Currently, Ulster does not participate in this championship, Cavan the 2014 champions represented Leinster in the absence of an Ulster competition. [1][2]

Kerry are the most successful county in the competition's history, having lifted the title on eighteen occasions. Kerry are current winners winning four in a row All Irelands. The 2008 championship was won by Dublin for the first time since 1960.[3] Sligo defeated Kerry in 2010 to win their first title since 1935.[4]

For the bulk of this competition's history, the winners of the provincial championships met to decide who was the "Home" winner. This team then met the champion county in Great Britain to determine the All-Ireland champion.

Top winners

Team Wins Years won
1 Kerry 19 1913, 1915, 1924, 1928, 1930, 1941, 1949, 1954, 1963, 1967, 1983, 1991, 1994, 2006, 2012, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018
2 Cork 17 1951, 1953, 1955, 1964, 1972, 1984, 1987, 1989, 1990, 1993, 1996, 2001, 2005, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2013
3 London 6 1938, 1966, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1986
Dublin 6 1914, 1916, 1939, 1948, 1960, 2008
4 Mayo 5 1933, 1950, 1957, 1995, 1997
Meath 5 1947, 1952, 1962, 1988, 2003
5 Galway 4 1931, 1958, 1965, 1985
Louth 4 1925, 1932, 1934, 1961
6 Tipperary 3 1912, 1923, 1998
7 Roscommon 2 1940, 2000
Waterford 2 1999, 2004
Wicklow 2 1936, 2002
Sligo 2 1935, 2010
Cavan 2 1927, 2014
8 Down 1 1946
Fermanagh 1 1959
Laois 1 1973
Longford 1 1937
Monaghan 1 1956
Tyrone 1 1968
Westmeath 1 1929
Wexford 1 1992
Armagh 1 1926

Roll of honour

Year Winner Opponent
2018[5] Kerry 2-13 Galway 2-11
2017[6] Kerry 2-19 Meath 1-14
2016[7] Kerry 2-18 Mayo 2-11
2015[8] Kerry 2-18 Mayo 0-10
2014[9] Cavan 2-14 Kerry 0-14
2013[10] Cork 0-13 Kildare 1-7
2012[11] Kerry 0-19 Mayo 1-7
2011 Cork 1-12 Kildare 0-13
2010 Sligo 2-10 Kerry 1-7
2009 Cork 0-15 Roscommon 0-12
2008 Dublin 0-13 Roscommon 0-7
2007 Cork 1-14 Wexford 3-2
2006 Kerry 1-9 Roscommon 0-10
2005 Cork 0-10 Meath 1-4
2004 Waterford 1-10 2-12 (R) Leitrim 1-10 2-9 (R)
2003 Meath 0-16 Galway 2-7
2002 Wicklow 4-9 Kerry 2-12
2001 Cork 1-15 Mayo 3-7
2000 Roscommon 0-14 Kerry 0-11
1999 Waterford 2-12 Meath 2-11
1998 Tipperary 2-9 Offaly 0-6
1997 Mayo 2-8 Kerry 1-10
1996 Cork 4-11 Meath 0-10
1995 Mayo 3-9 London 0-10
1994 Kerry 0-15 Galway 0-4
1993 Cork 0-11 Laois 2-3
1992 Wexford 1-9 Cork 0-11
1991 Kerry 2-14 London 0-5
1990 Cork 3-16 Warwickshire 0-8
1989 Cork 0-18 Warwickshire 0-3
1988 Meath 1-10 London 0-3
1987 Cork 0-14 Warwickshire 0-3
1986 London 1-9 Cork 0-7
1985 Galway 4-17 Warwickshire 0-4
1984 Cork 3-10 Warwickshire 0-7
1983 Kerry 0-15 Yorkshire 0-2
1974-82 No championship
1973 Laois 0-12 London 1-8
1972 Cork 5-16 Hertfordshire 0-3
1971 London 1-9 Dublin 0-9
1970 London 1-12 Kildare 0-11
1969 London 3-9 Wicklow 1-12
1968 Tyrone 3-8 London 0-7
1967 Kerry 0-9 London 0-4
1966 London 1-6 Cork 0-8
1965 Galway 1-8 Hertfordshire 0-4
1964 Cork 1-8 London 2-4
1963 Kerry 3-5 Lancashire 2-5
1962 Meath 1-13 London 3-5
1961 Louth 1-13 Yorkshire 1-10
1960 Dublin 2-5 London 0-5
1959 Fermanagh 1-11 London 2-4
1958 Galway 4-5 Lancashire 3-1
1957 Mayo 2-7 Warwickshire 2-5
1956 Monaghan 3-7 London 2-6
1955 Cork 3-9 Warwickshire 1-5
1954 Kerry 1-7 London 1-5
1953 Cork 1-11 Lancashire 1-4
1952 Meath 3-9 London 0-4
1951 Cork 5-11 Warwickshire 1-3
1950 Mayo 2-4 London 0-3
1949 Kerry 2-14 Lancashire 0-6
1948 Dublin 2-11 London 1-5
1947 Meath 2-11 London 2-6
1946 Down 2-10 Warwickshire 1-9
1945 No championship
1944 No championship
1943 No championship
1942 No championship
1941 Kerry 0-9 Cavan 0-4
1940 Roscommon 2-9 Westmeath 0-5
1939 Dublin 2-14 London 0-4
1938 London 5-7 Leitrim 2-9
1937 Longford 0-9 London 0-7
1936 Wicklow 3-3 Mayo 2-5
1935 Sligo 5-8 London 0-3
1934 Louth 1-3 London 0-3
1933 Mayo 3-7 London 2-4
1932 Louth 0-6 London 0-4
1931 Galway 3-3 London 1-5
1930 Kerry 2-2 Dublin 1-4
1929 Westmeath 0-9 London 1-2
1928 Kerry 2-8 Louth 2-3
1927 Cavan 0-7 Kildare 0-3
1926 Armagh 4-11 Dublin 0-4
1925 Louth 2-6 Mayo 2-5
1924 Kerry 1-6 Longford 0-4
1923 Tipperary 2-6 Carlow 1-1
1922 No championship
1921 No championship
1920 No championship
1919 No championship
1918 No championship
1917 No championship
1916 Dublin 1-2 6-4 (R) Limerick 1-2 0-3 (R)
1915 Kerry 0-6 Westmeath 1-2
1914 Dublin 5-4 Mayo 1-6
1913 Kerry 0-7 Carlow 1-2
1912 Tipperary 1-4 Louth 1-3

By province

Province All-Irelands Most recent winning team
Munster Munster counties 39 Kerry, 2018
Leinster Leinster counties 21 Dublin, 2008
Connacht Connacht counties 12 Sligo, 2010
Ulster Ulster counties 7 Cavan, 2014*

* represented Leinster due to Ulster no longer participating.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-08-17. Retrieved 2014-12-08.
  2. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-08-25. Retrieved 2014-12-08.
  3. ^ HILL 16
  4. ^ RTE report Archived 2010-08-22 at the Wayback Machine.
  5. ^ "Keane praises his crew after Kerry land 19th junior crown". Irish Independent. 23 July 2018. Retrieved 23 July 2018.
  6. ^ "Conor Cox shines as Kerry junior footballers capture three-in-a-row". Irish Examiner. 5 August 2017. Retrieved 5 August 2017.
  7. ^ "All-Ireland JFC final: back-to-back titles for Kerry". Hogan Stand. 6 August 2016. Retrieved 10 August 2016.
  8. ^ "All-Ireland JFC final: Kerry crowned champions". Hogan Stand. 8 August 2015. Retrieved 8 August 2015.
  9. ^ "All-Ireland JFC final: Hayes brace does the job for Breffni". Hogan Stand. 23 August 2014. Retrieved 23 August 2014.
  10. ^ "All-Ireland JFC final: Rebels squeeze home". Hogan Stand. 24 August 2013. Retrieved 26 August 2013.
  11. ^ "Coach happy crown won the Kerry way". Irish Examiner. 27 August 2012. Retrieved 27 August 2012.

Sources

  • Roll of Honour from RTE website
  • Roll of Honour from gaainfo.com
  • 2011 Final Report
Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=All-Ireland_Junior_Football_Championship&oldid=851679161"
This content was retrieved from Wikipedia : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/All-Ireland_Junior_Football_Championship
This page is based on the copyrighted Wikipedia article "All-Ireland Junior Football Championship"; it is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-SA). You may redistribute it, verbatim or modified, providing that you comply with the terms of the CC-BY-SA