51st New Zealand Parliament

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Fifty-first Parliament of New Zealand
50th Parliament 52nd Parliament
Parliament House, Wellington, New Zealand (50).JPG
Overview
Term 20 October 2014 – 18 August 2017
Election New Zealand general election, 2014
Government Fifth National Government
House of Representatives
New Zealand-01.svg
Members 121
Speaker of the House Rt Hon David Carter
Leader of the House Hon Simon Bridges
––Hon Gerry Brownlee until 2 May 2017
Prime Minister Rt Hon Bill English
––Rt Hon John Key until 12 December 2016
Leader of the Opposition Jacinda Ardern
––Andrew Little until 1 August 2017
Sovereign
Monarch HM Elizabeth II
Governor-General HE Rt. Hon Dame Patsy Reddy from 28 September 2016
––HE Rt. Hon Lt. Gen. Sir Jerry Mateparae until 31 August 2016

The 51st New Zealand Parliament was elected at the 2014 general election. This Parliament consists of 121 members (120 seats plus one overhang seat) and was in place from September 2014 until August 2017, followed by the New Zealand general election, 2017. Following the final vote count John Key was able to continue to lead the Fifth National Government.

The Parliament was elected using a mixed-member proportional representation (MMP) voting system. Members of Parliament (MPs) represent 71 geographical electorates: 16 in the South Island, 48 in the North Island and 7 Māori electorates. The remaining members were elected from party lists using the Sainte-Laguë method to realise proportionality. The number of geographical electorates was increased from 70 at the previous election, to account for New Zealand's increasing population.[1]

Electorate boundaries for 51st Parliament

Electoral boundaries with results

The Representation Commission is tasked with reviewing electorate boundaries every five years following each New Zealand census.[2] The last review was undertaken in 2007 following the 2006 census, and the electorate boundaries determined then were used in both the 2008 and 2011 general elections.[3]

The next census was scheduled for 8 March 2011, but it was postponed due to the disruption caused by the 2011 Christchurch earthquake on 22 February .[4] The census was formally conducted on 5 March 2013 with additional data collection over the following several weeks,[5] Following the census it was determined there would be sufficient time to conduct a boundary review of all electorates.

The boundaries were redrawn based on population distribution and the Māori electoral option, where people of Māori descent can opt to be either on the general or the Māori roll.[6] By law, the South Island must have 16 general electorates, with the number of North Island general and Māori electorates being the respective population in each group divided by one-sixteenth of the South Island general electorate population, within a tolerance of five percent. At the 2011 election, there were 47 North Island general electorates and seven Māori electorates, totalling 70 electorates across the country.[1]

Following significant consultation final boundaries were released by the Representation Commission on 17 April 2014. The 2014 general election was conducted under these boundaries on 20 September 2014. The increase in population in the Auckland region as recorded in the 2013 census meant an extra electorate was required to keep all electorates within five percent of their quota. To accommodate an extra electorate the Electoral Commission proposed major changes in west Auckland by abolishing the Waitakere electorate and establishing two new electorates, namely Kelston and Upper Harbour. Boundaries within Christchurch changed substantially, with several electorates growing and decreasing due to population movement around the city since the 2010–11 Christchurch earthquakes. In particular a dramatic change was seen in the electorates of Christchurch East, Christchurch Central and Port Hills with lesser changes in Selwyn, Wigram and Waimakariri.[7]

2014 general election

Members

The tables below show the members of the 51st Parliament based on preliminary counts of the 2014 general election.[8]

Overview

The table below shows the number of MPs in each party following the 2014 election and at dissolution:

Affiliation Members[9]
At 2014 election At dissolution
National 60 59
Māori CS 2 2
ACT CS 1 1
United Future CS 1 1
Government total 64 63
Labour 32 32
Green 14 14
NZ First 11 12
Opposition total 57 58
Total
121 121
Working Government majority 7 5

Notes

New Zealand National Party (60)

The National Party won 47.04% of the vote, entitling it to 60 seats. As it won 41 electorates, an additional 19 members were taken from the party list. After the resignation of Northland MP Mike Sabin a by-election was held and lost to New Zealand First. The party's share of seats was reduced to 59.

15 new National Party members were elected, nine from electorates and six from the list. 45 members from the 50th Parliament were returned.

Name Electorate (list if blank) Term in office Portfolios & Responsibilities
David Carter 1994–
  • Speaker of the House
  • Chairperson, Officers of Parliament Committee
  • Chairperson, Business Committee
  • Chairperson, Standing Orders Committee
  • Chairperson, Parliamentary Service Commission
Chester Borrows Whanganui 2005–
  • Deputy Speaker of the House
Lindsay Tisch Waikato 1999–
  • Assistant Speaker of the House
Ministers in Cabinet[10]
Bill English 1990–
Paula Bennett Upper Harbour 2005–
Steven Joyce 2008–
Gerry Brownlee Ilam 1996–
Simon Bridges Tauranga 2008–
Amy Adams Selwyn 2008–
  • Minister of Justice
  • Minister for Courts
  • Minister for Social Housing
  • Minister Responsible for Social Investment
  • Minister Responsible for Housing New Zealand Corporation
  • Associate Minister of Finance
Jonathan Coleman Northcote 2005–
Christopher Finlayson 2005–
  • Attorney-General
  • Minister for Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations
  • Associate Minister of Māori Development
  • Minister in Charge of the NZSIS
  • Minister Responsible for the GCSB
  • Chairperson, Privileges Committee
Michael Woodhouse 2008–
Anne Tolley East Coast 1999–2002; 2005–
Hekia Parata 2008–
Nathan Guy Ōtaki 2005–
Murray McCully East Coast Bays 1987–
Nikki Kaye Auckland Central 2008–
  • Minister for Youth
  • Associate Minister of Education
Nick Smith Nelson 1990–
Judith Collins Papakura 2002–
Todd McClay Rotorua 2008–
  • Minister for State Owned Enterprises
  • Minister of Trade
Maggie Barry North Shore 2011–
Paul Goldsmith 2011–
Louise Upston Taupō 2008–
  • Minister of Corrections
  • Associate Minister of Primary Industries
  • Associate Minister of Education
  • Associate Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment
Alfred Ngaro 2011–
  • Minister for Pacific Peoples
  • Minister for the Community and Voluntary Sector
  • Associate Minister for Children
  • Associate Minister for Social Housing
Ministers outside Cabinet[10]
Nicky Wagner Christchurch Central 2005–
  • Minister of Customs
  • Minister for Disability Issues
  • Associate Minister of Conservation
  • Associate Minister supporting Greater Christchurch Regeneration
Mark Mitchell Rodney 2011–
Jacqui Dean Waitaki 2005–
  • Minister for Commerce and Consumer Affairs
  • Minister for Small Business
  • Associate Minister for ACC
  • Associate Minister for Local Government
David Bennett Hamilton East 2005–
  • Minister for Veterans' Affairs
  • Minister for Food Safety
  • Associate Minister of Immigration
  • Associate Minister of Transport
Members of Parliament
Alastair Scott Wairarapa 2014–
  • Deputy Chairperson, Finance and Expenditure Committee
Andrew Bayly Hunua 2014–
  • Deputy Chairperson, Local Government and Environment Committee
Barbara Kuriger Taranaki-King Country 2014–
  • Third Whip
  • Deputy Chairperson, Health Committee
Brett Hudson 2014–
  • Deputy Chairperson, Commerce Committee
Chris Bishop 2014–
  • Chairperson, Finance and Expenditure Committee
Craig Foss Tukituki 2005–
  • Deputy Chairperson, Regulations Review Committee
Ian McKelvie Rangitīkei 2011–
  • Chairperson, Primary Production Committee
Jami-Lee Ross Botany 2011–
  • Junior Whip
  • Chairperson, Parliamentary Service Commission Precincts Committee
Jian Yang 2011–
  • Chairperson, Education and Science Committee
  • Parliamentary Private Secretary to the Minister for Ethnic Communities
Jo Goodhew Rangitata 2005–
Jo Hayes 2014–
  • Chairperson, Social Services Committee
Jonathan Young New Plymouth 2008–
  • Chairperson, Transport and Industrial Relations Committee
  • Parliamentary Private Secretary to the Minister of Economic Development
Jono Naylor 2014–
  • Deputy Chairperson, Justice and Electoral Committee
Kanwaljit Singh Bakshi 2008–
  • Chairperson, Law and Order Committee
  • Parliamentary Private Secretary to the Minister of Police
Matthew Doocey Waimakariri 2014–
  • Deputy Chairperson, Social Services Committee
Maureen Pugh 2015–
  • Deputy Chairperson, Law and Order Committee
Maurice Williamson Pakuranga 1987–
Melissa Lee 2008–
  • Chairperson, Commerce Committee
  • Parliamentary Private Secretary to the Minister for Ethnic Communities
Tutehounuku Korako 2014–
  • Chairperson, Māori Affairs Committee
Parmjeet Parmar 2014–
  • Deputy Chairperson, Transport and Industrial Relations Committee
Paul Foster-Bell 2013–
  • Deputy Chairperson, Government Administration Committee
Peseta Sam Lout-Iiga Maungakiekie 2008–
Sarah Dowie Invercargill 2014–
  • Chairperson, Justice and Electoral Committee
Scott Simpson Coromandel 2011–
  • Chairperson, Local Government and Environment Committee
  • Parliamentary Private Secretary to the Minister for the Environment
  • Parliamentary Private Secretary to Minister of Conservation
Shane Reti Whangarei 2014–
  • Deputy Chairperson, Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade Committee
Simon O'Connor Tāmaki 2011–
  • Chairperson, Health Committee
Stuart Smith Kaikōura 2014–
  • Deputy Chairperson, Primary Production Committee
Tim Macindoe Hamilton West 2008–
  • Senior Whip
Todd Barclay Clutha-Southland 2014–
  • Deputy Chairperson, Education and Science Committee
Todd Muller Bay of Plenty 2014–
  • Chairperson, Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade Committee
Members of the National caucus who resigned, retired or died during the term of the 51st Parliament
Mike Sabin Northland 2011–2015 Resigned January 2015
Tim Groser 2005–2015

Resigned December 2015

John Key Helensville 2002–2017

Resigned April 2017

New Zealand Labour Party (32)

The Labour Party won 25.13% of the vote, entitling it to 32 seats. As it won 27 electorates, an additional 5 members were taken from the party list. After the resignation of David Shearer in December 2016, the party's share of seats was reduced to 31 until Raymond Huo was sworn in in March 2017.

Three new Labour Party members were elected from the list. 29 members from the 50th Parliament were returned.

Name Electorate (list if blank) Term in office Portfolios & Responsibilities
Trevor Mallard Hutt South 1984–1990; 1993–
  • Deputy Chairperson for Officers of Parliament Committee
  • Assistant Speaker of the House
  • Spokesperson for Sport and Recreation
  • Spokesperson for Animal Welfare
  • Spokesperson for Parliamentary Reform
Shadow Cabinet[11]
Andrew Little 2011–
Jacinda Ardern Mount Albert 2008–
  • Deputy Party Leader
  • Deputy Leader of the Opposition
  • Chairperson for Parliamentary Service Commission Artworks Committee
  • Spokesperson for Justice
  • Spokesperson for Arts, Culture and Heritage
  • Spokesperson for Children
  • Spokesperson for Small Business
  • Elected to Parliament in a by-election, replacing David Shearer
Grant Robertson Wellington Central 2008–
  • Spokesperson for Finance
  • Spokesperson for Employment
Phil Twyford Te Atatū 2008–
  • Spokesperson for Housing
  • Spokesperson for Building and Construction
  • Spokesperson for Auckland Issues
Megan Woods Wigram 2011–
  • Spokesperson for Canterbury Issues
  • Spokesperson for Climate Change
Chris Hipkins Rimutaka 2008–
  • Shadow Leader of the House
  • Spokesperson for Education
Kelvin Davis Te Tai Tokerau 2008–2011; 2014–
  • Spokesperson for Māori Development
  • Spokesperson for Corrections
Carmel Sepuloni Kelston 2008–2011; 2014–
  • Junior Whip
  • Spokesperson for Social Development
David Clark Dunedin North 2011–
  • Spokesperson for Economic Development and Regional Development
  • Spokesperson for Trade and Export Growth
David Parker 2002–
  • Deputy Chairperson, Privileges Committee
  • Shadow Attorney-General
  • Spokesperson for Environment
  • Spokesperson for Water
  • Spokesperson for State Owned Enterprises
  • Spokesperson for ICT
  • Spokesperson for Entrepreneurship
  • Spokesperson for Regulatory Reform
Nanaia Mahuta Hauraki-Waikato 1996–
  • Deputy Chairperson, Māori Affairs Committee
  • Spokesperson for Conservation
  • Spokesperson for Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations
  • Spokesperson for Whānau Ora
Stuart Nash Napier 2008–2011; 2014–
  • Spokesperson for Police
  • Spokesperson for Revenue
  • Spokesperson for Energy
  • Spokesperson for Forestry
Members of Parliament
Meka Whaitiri Ikaroa-Rāwhiti 2013–
  • Spokesperson for Local Government
Iain Lees-Galloway Palmerston North 2008–
  • Spokesperson for Workplace Relations and Safety
  • Spokesperson for Immigration
Su’a William Sio Mangere 2008–
  • Spokesperson for Pacific Island Affairs
  • Spokesperson for Interfaith Dialogue
Sue Moroney 2005–
  • Spokesperson for Transport
  • Spokesperson for ACC
Damien O'Connor West Coast-Tasman 1993–2008; 2009–
  • Spokesperson for Primary Industries
  • Spokesperson for Biosecurity
  • Spokesperson for Food Safety
Kris Faafoi Mana 2010–
  • Senior Whip
  • Spokesperson for State Services
  • Spokesperson for Racing
  • Spokesperson for Tourism
Jenny Salesa Manukau East 2014–
  • Spokesperson for Skills and Training
Peeni Henare Tāmaki Makaurau 2014–
  • Spokesperson for Urban Māori
  • Spokesperson for Māori Broadcasting
Clare Curran Dunedin South 2008–
  • Chairperson for Parliamentary Service Commission ICT Committee
  • Spokesperson for Broadcasting
  • Spokesperson for Open Government
  • Spokesperson for Civil Defence and Emergency Management
Adrian Paki Rurawhe Te Tai Hauāuru 2014–
  • Spokesperson for Internal Affairs
Annette King Rongotai 1984–1990; 1993–
  • Spokesperson for State Services
Ruth Dyson Port Hills 1993–
  • Chairperson for Government Administration Committee
  • Spokesperson for Senior Citizens
  • Spokesperson for Women's Affairs
  • Spokesperson for Statistics
Rino Tirikatene Te Tai Tonga 2011–
  • Spokesperson for Fisheries
  • Spokesperson for Customs
Poto Williams Christchurch East 2013-
  • Spokesperson for Community and Voluntary
  • Spokesperson for Disability Issues
Louisa Wall Manurewa 2008; 2011–
  • Spokesperson for Courts
  • Spokesperson for Youth Affairs
Clayton Cosgrove 1999–
  • Spokesperson for Business Outreach
  • Spokesperson for Commerce
  • Spokesperson for Veterans’ Affairs
Michael Wood Mount Roskill 2016–
  • Spokesperson for Consumer Affairs
  • Spokesperson for Ethnic Communities
  • Spokesperson for Revenue
Raymond Huo 2008–2014; 2017–
  • Entered Parliament March 2017
  • Spokesperson for Land Information
members of the Labour caucus who resigned during the term of the 51st Parliament
Phil Goff Mount Roskill 1981–1990; 1993–2016
  • Spokesperson for Defence
  • Spokesperson for Ethnic Communities
  • Resigned October 2016 after being elected Mayor of Auckland
David Shearer Mount Albert 2009–2016
  • Spokesperson for Consumer Affairs
  • Spokesperson for Foreign Affairs
  • Resigned December 2016 after being hired by the United Nations
David Cunliffe New Lynn 1999–2017
  • Chairperson for Regulations Review Committee
  • Spokesperson for Disarmament
  • Spokesperson for Research and Development
  • Spokesperson for Science and Innovation
  • Spokesperson for Land information
  • Undersecretary to the Leader on Superannuation Issues
  • Resigned April 2017

Green Party of Aotearoa New Zealand (14)

The Green Party won 10.7% of the vote, entitling it to 14 seats. As it did not win any electorate, all members were taken from the party list.

One new Green Party members were elected, with thirteen members from the 50th Parliament returning.

Name Electorate (list if blank) Term in office Portfolios & Responsibilities
James Shaw 2014–
  • Co-leader of the Green Party
  • Spokesperson for Climate Change
  • Spokesperson for Economic Development
Metiria Turei 2002–
  • Co-leader of the Green Party
  • Spokesperson for Inequality
  • Spokesperson for Building and Social Housing
  • Spokesperson for National Intelligence
  • Spokesperson for Security
Catherine Delahunty 2008–
  • Spokesperson for Education and Novopay
  • Spokesperson for Water
  • Spokesperson for Human Rights
  • Spokesperson for Te Tiriti o Waitangi
David Clendon 2009–
  • Musterer ('’Party Whip’')
  • Spokesperson for Tourism
  • Spokesperson for Small Business
  • Spokesperson for Criminal Justice, Courts, Corrections, and Police
Denise Roche 2011–
Eugenie Sage 2011–
  • Spokesperson for Environment
  • Spokesperson for Primary Industries
  • Spokesperson for Land Information
  • Spokesperson for Canterbury Earthquake Recover
  • Spokesperson for Earthquake Commission
Gareth Hughes 2010–
  • Spokesperson for Energy and Resources
  • Spokesperson for Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment
  • Spokesperson for Science and Innovation
  • Spokesperson for ICT
  • Spokesperson for Broadcasting
  • Spokesperson for Wellington Issues
Jan Logie 2011–
  • Spokesperson for Social Development, Women, Community and Voluntary Sector
  • Spokesperson for State Services
  • Spokesperson for Local Government and Civil Defence
  • Spokesperson for Rainbow Issues
Julie Anne Genter 2011–
  • Spokesperson for Finance, Revenue, and SOEs
  • Spokesperson for Transport
  • Spokesperson for Youth
Kennedy Graham 2008–
  • Spokesperson for Foreign Affairs, Defence, Disarmament, Customs
  • Spokesperson for Trade
  • Spokesperson for Veterans Affairs
  • Spokesperson for Senior Citizens
Mojo Mathers 2011–
  • Spokesperson for Commerce, Consumer Affairs, and Regulatory Reform
  • Spokesperson for Disability Issues
  • Spokesperson for Animal Welfare
Steffan Browning 2011–
  • Spokesperson for Organics
  • Spokesperson for GE
  • Spokesperson for Biosecurity
  • Spokesperson for Pesticides
  • Spokesperson for Food Safety
Marama Davidson 2015– Entered Parliament November 2015
Barry Coates 2016- Entered Parliament October 2016
Members of the Greens caucus who resigned during the term of the 50th Parliament
Russel Norman 2008–2015 Resigned October 2015
Kevin Hague 2008–2016 Resigned October 2016

New Zealand First (11)

New Zealand First won 8.66% of the vote, entitling it to eleven seats from the party list. An additional seat was gained for the party when Winston Peters won the Northland by-election.

Name Electorate (list if blank) Term in office Portfolios & Responsibilities
Winston Peters Northland 1978–1981; 1984–2008; 2011–
  • Leader of New Zealand First
  • Spokesperson for Economic Development
  • Spokesperson for Finance
  • Spokesperson for Foreign Affairs
  • Spokesperson for Immigration
  • Spokesperson for Racing
  • Spokesperson for Senior Citizens and Superannuation
  • Elected to Parliament in a by-election, replacing Mike Sabin
Ron Mark 1996–2008; 2014–
  • Deputy Leader of New Zealand First
  • Spokesperson for Arts, Culture and Heritage
  • Spokesperson for Defence
  • Spokesperson for Building and Construction
  • Spokesperson for Police
  • Spokesperson for Veteran’s Affairs
  • Spokesperson for Local Government
Barbara Stewart 2002–2008; 2011–
  • Party Whip
  • Spokesperson for ACC
  • Spokesperson for Disability Issues
  • Spokesperson for Family Issues
  • Spokesperson for Health
Clayton Robert Henry Mitchell 2014–
  • Party Associate Whip
  • Spokesperson for Internal Affairs
  • Spokesperson for Sports and Recreation
  • Spokesperson for Conservation
  • Spokesperson for Labour and Industrial Relations
Darroch Leicester Ball 2014–
  • Spokesperson for Research, Science and Technology
  • Spokesperson for Social Policy/Welfare
  • Spokesperson for Civil Defence and Emergency Issues
  • Spokesperson for Consumer Affairs
  • Spokesperson for Youth Affairs
Denis O'Rourke 2011–
  • Spokesperson for Attorney-General and Courts
  • Spokesperson for Christchurch Earthquake Issues
  • Spokesperson for Security Issues
  • Spokesperson for Constitutional Review
  • Spokesperson for Housing
  • Spokesperson for Justice
  • Spokesperson for Transport
  • Spokesperson for Climate Change
  • Spokesperson for Environment and RMA
  • Spokesperson for Government Communications Security Bureau
Fletcher H. Tabuteau 2014–
  • Spokesperson for Commerce
  • Spokesperson for Energy
  • Spokesperson for Tourism
  • Spokesperson for Revenue
  • Spokesperson for Trade
Mahesh Bindra 2014–
  • Spokesperson for Corrections
  • Spokesperson for Ethnic Affairs
  • Spokesperson for Land Information New Zealand
  • Spokesperson for Customs
Tracey Martin 2011–
  • Spokesperson for Communications and IT
  • Spokesperson for Education
  • Spokesperson for Women's Affairs
  • Spokesperson for Broadcasting
Rewiti Pomare Kingi Paraone 2002–2008; 2014–
  • Spokesperson for Māori Affairs
  • Spokesperson for Treaty of Waitangi Issues
  • Spokesperson for Pacific Island Affairs
  • Spokesperson for Office of Treaty Settlements
Richard Ivor Prosser 2011–
  • Spokesperson for Agriculture and Primary Industries
  • Spokesperson for Biosecurity
  • Spokesperson for State Owned Enterprises
  • Spokesperson for Fisheries
  • Spokesperson for Forestry
  • Spokesperson for Outdoor Recreation
  • Spokesperson for Serious Fraud Office
Ria Bond 2015–
  • Spokesperson for Community and Voluntary Sector

Entered Parliament April 2015

Māori Party (2)

The Māori Party won 1.32% of the vote, which is short of the 5% threshold. However, the Māori Party won an electorate and will thus be represented by one electorate MP. The 1.32% party vote share entitles the party to two seats, including an MP from the party list.

Name Electorate (list if blank) Term in office Portfolios & Responsibilities
Marama Fox 2014–
  • Co-leader of the Māori Party
Te Ururoa Flavell Waiariki 2005–

United Future (1)

United Future won 0.22% of the vote, which is short of the 5% threshold. United Future won one electorate and will thus be represented by one electorate MP. Because the 0.22% party vote share would not entitle United Future to any seats, the size of the 51st Parliament was increased to 121 seats.

Name Electorate (list if blank) Term in office Portfolios & Responsibilities
Peter Dunne Ōhariu 1984–

ACT New Zealand (1)

ACT New Zealand won 0.69% of the vote, which is short of the 5% threshold. ACT won one electorate and was thus represented by one electorate MP. The 0.69% party vote share entitled the party to one seat.

Name Electorate (list if blank) Term in office Portfolios & Responsibilities
David Seymour Epsom 2014–
  • Leader of ACT New Zealand
  • Parliamentary Under-Secretary to the Minister of Education
  • Parliamentary Under-Secretary to the Minister of Regulatory Reform

Summary of changes during term

The following changes occurred in the 51st Parliament:

# Electorate Incumbent Winner
Party Name Date vacated Reason Party Name Date elected Change
1. Northland National Mike Sabin 30 January 2015 Personal reasons following reports he was suspect of Police investigation. NZ First Winston Peters 28 March 2015 New Zealand First gain
National loss
2. List 1 NZ First Winston Peters 23 April 2015 Elected to electorate seat. NZ First Ria Bond 24 April 2015 List
3. List Green Russell Norman 30 October 2015 Resigned to take up position as Chief Executive of Greenpeace Aotearoa New Zealand. [12] Green Marama Davidson 2 November 2015 List
4. List National Tim Groser 19 December 2015 Resigned to become NZ Ambassador to the United States. [13] National Maureen Pugh 21 December 2015 List
5. List Green Kevin Hague 6 October 2016 Resigned to become Chief Executive of the Royal Forest and Bird Protection Society of New Zealand Green Barry Coates 7 October 2016 List
6. Mount Roskill Labour Phil Goff 12 October 2016 Resigned following election as Mayor of Auckland. Labour Michael Wood 3 December 2016 Labour hold
7. Mount Albert Labour David Shearer 31 December 2016 Resigned to take up a role with the United Nations. Labour Jacinda Ardern 25 February 2017 Labour hold
8. List 1 Labour Jacinda Ardern 25 February 2017 Elected to electorate seat Labour Raymond Huo [14] 15 March 2017 List

^1 These changes occurred as a result of the elevation of Winston Peters and Jacinda Ardern from their respective party lists to being elected to an electorate seat.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Reviewing electorate numbers and boundaries". Elections New Zealand. Archived from the original on 9 November 2011. Retrieved 6 January 2012. 
  2. ^ "What is the Representation Commission?". Chief Electoral Office. Retrieved 3 December 2011. 
  3. ^ "Reviewing electorates – frequently asked questions". Chief Electoral Office. Retrieved 3 December 2011. 
  4. ^ "Christchurch quake: More liquefaction than Sept". 3 News. 25 February 2011. Retrieved 3 December 2011. 
  5. ^ Bascand, Geoff. "2013 Census announcement – Media Release". Statistics New Zealand. Retrieved 3 December 2011. 
  6. ^ "Next census to be held in 2013". The National Business Review. 27 May 2011. Retrieved 6 January 2012. 
  7. ^ "Final electorate boundaries". Electoral Commission of New Zealand. 17 September 2014. Retrieved 15 September 2014. 
  8. ^ "Provisional List of Successful Candidates -- 2014 General Election - Preliminary Results". Electoral Commission. Retrieved 10 August 2016. 
  9. ^ "New Zealand General Election 2014 Official Results". Retrieved 24 September 2017. 
  10. ^ a b "MINISTERIAL LIST". Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet. Retrieved 8 February 2017. 
  11. ^ "Labour MPs Spokesperson roles and ranking" (PDF). New Zealand Labour Party. 19 December 2011. Retrieved 19 December 2011. 
  12. ^ Jones, Nicholas (11 September 2015). "Russel Norman quits Greens and Parliament to head Greenpeace NZ". The New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 12 September 2015. 
  13. ^ Small, Vernon (7 December 2015). "Groser makes way for Collins' return". The Press. p. A1. Retrieved 7 December 2015. 
  14. ^ "Labour's Raymond Huo set to return to Parliament after Maryan Street steps aside". The New Zealand Herald. 21 February 2017. Retrieved 15 March 2017. 
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