25th New Zealand Parliament

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Twenty-fifth Parliament of New Zealand
24th Parliament 26th Parliament
Parliament House, Wellington, New Zealand (50).JPG
Overview
Term 25 March 1936 – 26 August 1938
Election New Zealand general election, 1935
Government First Labour Government
House of Representatives
New Zealand 25th Parliament.png
Members 80
Speaker of the House Bill Barnard
Prime Minister Michael Joseph Savage
Leader of the Opposition Adam Hamilton
––George Forbes until 2 November 1936
Legislative Council
Members 39 (at start)
38 (at end)
Speaker of the Council Sir Walter Carncross
Leader of the Council Mark Fagan
Sovereign
Monarch HM George VI
––HM Edward VIII until 11 December 1936
Governor-General HE Rt. Hon. The Viscount Galway

The 25th New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand Parliament. It opened on 25 March 1936, following the 1935 election. It was dissolved on 16 September 1938 in preparation for the 1938 election.

The 25th Parliament was notable in that it was the first time the Labour Party had a parliamentary majority and formed a government, the First Labour Government. The new Prime Minister was Michael Joseph Savage. The opposition consisted of the United Party and the Reform Party, which merged to form the National Party in 1936.

The 25th Parliament consisted of eighty representatives, each elected from separate geographical electorates. As the 1935 elections had been a landslide victory for the Labour Party, the 25th Parliament was dominated by Labour MPs — 53 of the 80 were members of the Labour Party. The main opposition consisted of a coalition of the Reform Party, the United Party, and three independents, having a total of 19 MPs. Part way through the 25th Parliament, Reform and United took their coalition to the next step, and merged into a single group. This was called the National Party. The smaller Country Party and Rātana movement had two MPs each, and there were four independents not aligned with the coalition. The Democrat Party, despite winning a significant portion of the vote, did not hold any seats.

Electoral boundaries

NewZealandElectorates1935.png

Ministries

The 24th Parliament had been led by a coalition of the Reform Party and the United Party, formed in September 1931 during the term of the 23rd Parliament and led by George Forbes.[1] The primary opposition had been the Labour Party.

At the 1935 election, the Labour Party obtained a parliamentary majority and formed a government, the First Labour Government. The leader of the Labour Party, Michael Joseph Savage, became Prime Minister.[2] The opposition consisted of the United Party and the Reform Party, which merged in 1936 during the term of the 25th Parliament to form the National Party. The Savage Ministry was in power until Savage's death on 27 March 1940.[3]

Party standings

1935-36

Party Leader(s) Seats at start
Labour Party Michael Joseph Savage 53
Reform Party Gordon Coates 9
United Party George Forbes 7
Country Party Harold Rushworth 2
Ratana Eruera Tirikatene 2
Independents 7

1936-38

Party Leader(s) Seats at start
Labour Party Michael Joseph Savage 55
National Party Adam Hamilton 19
Country Party Harold Rushworth 2
Independents 4

Members

Members of the 25th New Zealand Parliament, the Sergeant-at-arms and the Clerk of the House.

Initial MPs

Key

 Labour    Independent    United    Reform    United/Reform    Democrat    Ratana    Country Party  

[v · t · e] Electorate results for the New Zealand general election, 1935[4]
Electorate Incumbent Winner Majority Runner up
General electorates
Auckland Central Bill Parry 5,301[5] Clifford Reid Dodd[6]
Auckland East Frederick Schramm 2,337[7] Harold Percy Burton[8]
Auckland Suburbs Rex Mason 4,896[5] W A Bishop[9]
Auckland West Michael Joseph Savage 6,180[10] Ernest David Stallworthy[11]
Avon Dan Sullivan 5,410[12] L C Walker
Awarua Philip De La Perrelle James Hargest[nb 1] 950[14] Thomas Francis Doyle
Bay of Islands Harold Rushworth 2,121[15] C Cameron
Bay of Plenty vacant[nb 2] Gordon Hultquist 555[17] J T Merry[18]
Buller Paddy Webb 4,499[19] John H Powell[20]
Central Otago William Bodkin 1,819[19] H K Edie[21]
Chalmers Alfred Ansell Archibald Campbell 1,071[14] Alfred Ansell
Christchurch East Tim Armstrong 5,728[5] Sydney Richardson[22][23]
Christchurch North Henry Holland Sidney Holland 971[5] Robert Macfarlane
Christchurch South Ted Howard 5,585[5] Tom Milliken[24][25]
Clutha Peter McSkimming James Roy[nb 3] 1,930[15] Rev. Edwin Thomas Cox[26]
Dunedin Central Charles Statham Peter Neilson 1,729[14] D C Cameron[27]
Dunedin North James Wright Munro 1,668[15] Alexander Smith Falconer[28][29][30][31]
Dunedin South Fred Jones 3,378[17] Thomas Sidey
Dunedin West William Downie Stewart Gervan McMillan 945[32] William Downie Stewart[33]
Eden Arthur Stallworthy Bill Anderton 2,465[32] Arthur Stallworthy
Egmont Charles Wilkinson 3,172[5] James Ross[34]
Franklin Jack Massey Arthur Sexton 685[15] Jack Massey
Gisborne David William Coleman 1,817[7] Douglas Lysnar
Grey Lynn John A. Lee 8,012[32] George Wildish[35]
Hamilton Alexander Young Charles Barrell 1,391[15] Alexander Young
Hauraki Walter William Massey Charles Robert Petrie 544[36] Walter William Massey
Hawke's Bay Hugh Campbell Edward Cullen 1,010[14] Hugh Campbell
Hurunui George Forbes 1,203[5] D C Davie[37]
Hutt Walter Nash 7,757[7] Victor Emmanuel Jacobson[38]
Invercargill James Hargest William Denham 346[14] Gordon Reed[39]
Kaiapoi Richard Hawke Morgan Williams 1,424[14] Richard Hawke
Kaipara Gordon Coates 302[15] W Grounds
Lyttelton Terry McCombs 2,775[7] Seton Fulton Marshall[40][41]
Manawatu Joseph Linklater Clifford Hunter 60[19] Joseph Linklater
Manukau William Joseph Jordan 6,402[32] Herbert Jenner Wily[42]
Marsden Alfred Murdoch James Gillespie Barclay 347[5] Alfred Murdoch
Masterton George Sykes John Robertson 325[17] George Sykes
Mataura David McDougall 1,658[5] Thomas Golden[43]
Mid-Canterbury vacant[nb 4] Horace Herring 462[5] James Carr[45]
Motueka Keith Holyoake 280[14] Rubert York[46][47]
Napier Bill Barnard 4,057[48] F B Logan
Nelson Harry Atmore 2,610[15] Herbert Everett[49]
New Plymouth Sydney George Smith 831[14] Frederick Frost
Oamaru John Andrew MacPherson Arnold Nordmeyer 1,142[14] John Andrew MacPherson
Oroua John Cobbe 2,333[15] William Henry Oliver[nb 5]
Otaki William Hughes Field Leonard Lowry 1,720[19] G. A. Monk[51]
Pahiatua Alfred Ransom 1,175[5] R A Gower
Palmerston Jimmy Nash Joe Hodgens 115[52] Jimmy Nash
Parnell Bill Endean 731[36] Arthur Osborne
Patea Harold Dickie 649[14] W G Simpson
Raglan Lee Martin 1,695[14] Stewart Reid[53]
Rangitikei Alexander Stuart Ormond Wilson 907[54] Alexander Stuart
Riccarton Herbert Kyle 1,139[5] G T Thurston
Roskill Arthur Shapton Richards 4,023[36] Thomas James Fleming[11]
Rotorua Cecil Clinkard Alexander Moncur 1,452[15] Frederick Doidge
Stratford William Polson[nb 6] 339[15] Philip Skoglund
Tauranga Charles MacMillan Charles Harris Burnett 41[19] Charles MacMillan
Temuka Thomas Burnett 605[15] Thomas Herbert Langford
Thames Albert Samuel Jim Thorn 1,262[36] Albert Samuel
Timaru Clyde Carr 1,059[14] W Thomas
Waimarino Frank Langstone 1,863[15] C A Boles
Waipawa Albert Jull Hubert Christie 259[14] Albert Jull
Waikato Frederick Lye Robert Coulter 784[54] Frederick Lye
Wairarapa Alexander McLeod Ben Roberts 33[14] John Wiltshire Card[55][56]
Wairau Edward Healy Edwin Meachen 352[5] Edward Healy
Waitaki John Bitchener David Barnes 479[33] John Bitchener
Waitemata Alexander Harris Jack Lyon 2,684[5] Alexander Harris
Waitomo Walter Broadfoot 1,526[15] Jack Jones[57]
Wallace Adam Hamilton 2,034[5] L S Edmund
Wanganui Bill Veitch Joseph Cotterill 1,569[5] Bill Veitch
Wellington Central Peter Fraser 4,479[15] Will Mason[58]
Wellington East Bob Semple 3,323[5] Ossie Mazengarb
Wellington North Charles Henry Chapman 794[7] Elizabeth Gilmer[59]
Wellington South Robert McKeen 6,059[5] Henry Featherston Toogood[38][56]
Wellington Suburbs Robert Alexander Wright 1,856[5] Peter Butler[38]
Westland James O'Brien 3,677[15] H R Young[60]
Māori electorates
Eastern Maori Āpirana Ngata 3,224[15] Tiaki Omana
Northern Maori Taurekareka Henare 983[15] Paraire Karaka Paikea
Southern Maori Eruera Tirikatene 43[15] Thomas Kaiporohu Bragg
Western Maori Taite Te Tomo Toko Ratana 47[61] Taite Te Tomo

Table footnotes:

  1. ^ James Hargest ran as an Independent, but was aligned to the Reform Party[13]
  2. ^ Kenneth Williams, the previous representative, died two days prior to the election[16]
  3. ^ James Roy ran as an Independent, but was aligned to the United/Reform Coalition
  4. ^ Jeremiah Connolly, the previous representative, died just prior to the election[44]
  5. ^ Father of the historian W. H. Oliver[50]
  6. ^ William Polson ran as an Independent, but was aligned to the United/Reform Coalition

By-elections during 25th Parliament

There was one by-election during the term of the 25th Parliament.

Electorate and by-election Date Incumbent Cause Winner
Manukau 1936 30 September[62] Bill Jordan Appointed High Commissioner, UK Arthur Osborne

Summary of changes

Notes

  1. ^ Scholefield 1950, pp. 48–49.
  2. ^ Gustafson, Barry. "Savage, Michael Joseph - Biography". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography. Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Retrieved 11 December 2011. 
  3. ^ Scholefield 1950, pp. 47, 48, 137.
  4. ^ The General Election, 1935. National Library. 1936. pp. 1–35. Retrieved 3 August 2013. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s "Election Results". The Evening Post. CXX (136). 5 December 1935. p. 5. Retrieved 12 November 2013. 
  6. ^ "Notice of Nominations Received and Polling Places Appointed". Auckland Star. LXVI (268). 12 November 1935. p. 9. Retrieved 13 November 2013. 
  7. ^ a b c d e "Maori Seats". The Evening Post. CXX (135). 4 December 1935. p. 12. Retrieved 11 November 2013. 
  8. ^ "Political Candidates". Auckland Star. LXVI (191). 14 August 1935. p. 8. Retrieved 11 November 2013. 
  9. ^ "Suburbs Seat". Auckland Star. LXVI (238). 8 October 1935. p. 11. Retrieved 14 November 2013. 
  10. ^ "Final Counts". Auckland Star. LXVI (289). 6 December 1935. p. 8. Retrieved 11 November 2013. 
  11. ^ a b "Parliamentary Elections". Auckland Star. LXVI (268). 12 November 1935. p. 9. Retrieved 14 November 2013. 
  12. ^ "Recount in Avon". The Evening Post. CXX (134). 3 December 1935. p. 12. Retrieved 11 November 2013. 
  13. ^ Wilson 1985, p. 203.
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n "Election Results". The Evening Post. CXX (137). 6 December 1935. p. 10. Retrieved 14 November 2013. 
  15. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r "General Election". The Evening Post. CXX (138). 7 December 1935. p. 11. Retrieved 14 November 2013. 
  16. ^ Robinson, Sheila. "Williams, Kenneth Stuart". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography. Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Retrieved 7 April 2011. 
  17. ^ a b c "Further Final Counts". The Evening Post. CXX (139). 9 December 1935. p. 10. Retrieved 16 November 2013. 
  18. ^ "Bay of Plenty Seat". Auckland Star. LXVI (174). 25 July 1935. p. 9. Retrieved 16 November 2013. 
  19. ^ a b c d e "How the votes were cast". The Evening Post. CXX (130). 28 November 1935. p. 8. Retrieved 16 November 2013. 
  20. ^ "Buller Seat". The Evening Post. CXX (96). 19 October 1935. p. 10. Retrieved 16 November 2013. 
  21. ^ "General Election". The Evening Post. CXX (10). 11 July 1935. p. 14. Retrieved 16 November 2013. 
  22. ^ "Christchurch East". The Evening Post. CXX (106). 31 October 1935. p. 22. Retrieved 14 November 2013. 
  23. ^ "Obituary Hon. E. Richardson, C.M.G". The Evening Post. LXXXIX (48). 26 February 1915. p. 8. Retrieved 21 March 2010. 
  24. ^ "Christchurch South". The Evening Post. CXX (105). 30 October 1935. p. 4. Retrieved 14 November 2013. 
  25. ^ "History". Cavell Leitch. Retrieved 14 November 2013. 
  26. ^ "Dunedin Way". Auckland Star. LXVI (275). 20 November 1935. p. 14. Retrieved 15 November 2013. 
  27. ^ "Dunedin Central". The Evening Post. CXX (84). 5 October 1935. p. 11. Retrieved 16 November 2013. 
  28. ^ Ammentorp, Steen. "Falconer". generals.dk. Retrieved 16 November 2013. 
  29. ^ "Cenotaph Record". Auckland War Memorial Museum. Retrieved 16 November 2013. 
  30. ^ "Brigadier A. S. Falconer". New Zealand Electronic Text Centre. Retrieved 16 November 2013. 
  31. ^ Gustafson 1986, p. 362.
  32. ^ a b c d "Parliamentary Elections". Auckland Star. LXVI (287). 4 December 1935. p. 3. Retrieved 11 November 2013. 
  33. ^ a b "Canterbury Westland Province". Auckland Star. LXVI (282). 28 November 1935. p. 11. Retrieved 17 November 2013. 
  34. ^ "Eltham Seat". The Evening Post. CXX (106). 31 October 1935. p. 10. Retrieved 14 November 2013. 
  35. ^ "Women Take Part". The Evening Post. CXX (107). 1 November 1935. p. 14. Retrieved 11 November 2013. 
  36. ^ a b c d "Final Counts". Auckland Star. LXVI (288). 5 December 1935. p. 8. Retrieved 14 November 2013. 
  37. ^ "General Election". The Evening Post. CXX (80). 1 October 1935. p. 10. Retrieved 14 November 2013. 
  38. ^ a b c "Notice of Nominations Received and Polling Places Appointed". The Evening Post. CXX (116). 12 November 1935. p. 3. Retrieved 12 November 2013. 
  39. ^ "Otago Seats". The Evening Post. CXX (127). 25 November 1935. p. 12. Retrieved 14 November 2013. 
  40. ^ "Lyttelton Seat". The Evening Post. CXX (115). 11 November 1935. p. 4. Retrieved 11 November 2013. 
  41. ^ "Notice of Nominations Received and Polling Places Appointed". Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser. LVIII (6155). 15 November 1935. p. 3. Retrieved 11 November 2013. 
  42. ^ "Manukau Contest". Auckland Star. LXVI (249). 21 October 1935. p. 9. Retrieved 11 November 2013. 
  43. ^ "Mataura Seat". The Evening Post. CXX (51). 28 August 1935. p. 11. Retrieved 11 November 2013. 
  44. ^ "Mr. J. Connolly, MP". The Evening Post. CXX (82). 3 October 1935. p. 11. Retrieved 16 November 2013. 
  45. ^ "Local and General". Ellesmere Guardian. LVI (80). 22 October 1935. p. 4. Retrieved 14 November 2013. 
  46. ^ "Uncertainty in Motueka". Auckland Star. LXVI (280). 26 November 1935. p. 12. Retrieved 16 November 2013. 
  47. ^ Parker, Edmund (November 1958). "Recollections of Earlier Days in Motueka, Part 1". Nelson Historical Society Journal. Nelson, New Zealand: Nelson Historical Society. Retrieved 16 November 2013. 
  48. ^ "Napier Seat". The Evening Post. CXX (134). 3 December 1935. p. 12. Retrieved 11 November 2013. 
  49. ^ "Nelson Seat". The Evening Post. CXX (34). 8 August 1935. p. 10. Retrieved 16 November 2013. 
  50. ^ "William Henry Oliver". Auckland War Memorial Museum. Retrieved 2 October 2015. 
  51. ^ "Otaki Seat". The Evening Post. CXX (55). 2 September 1935. p. 10. Retrieved 28 March 2014. 
  52. ^ "General Election". The Evening Post. CXX (136). 5 December 1935. p. 11. Retrieved 17 November 2013. 
  53. ^ "South Auckland". Auckland Star. LXVI (202). 27 August 1935. p. 9. Retrieved 15 November 2013. 
  54. ^ a b "General Election". The Evening Post. CXX (142). 12 December 1935. p. 13. Retrieved 17 November 2013. 
  55. ^ "Notice of Nominations Received and Polling Places Appointed". The Evening Post. CXX (117). 13 November 1935. p. 3. Retrieved 16 November 2013. 
  56. ^ a b "Wairarapa Seat". The Evening Post. CXX (16). 18 July 1935. p. 10. Retrieved 16 November 2013. 
  57. ^ "Mrs. R. Bleasel". Auckland Star. LXIX (277). 23 November 1938. p. 4. Retrieved 9 November 2013. 
  58. ^ "Nationalist Party". The Evening Post. CXX (47). 23 August 1935. p. 10. Retrieved 15 November 2013. 
  59. ^ Labrum, Bronwyn. "Gilmer, Elizabeth May". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography. Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Retrieved 11 November 2013. 
  60. ^ "Avon Seat". The Evening Post. CXII (118). 14 November 1931. p. 14. Retrieved 15 November 2013. 
  61. ^ "Maori Seats". The Evening Post. CXX (129). 27 November 1935. p. 10. Retrieved 11 November 2013. 
  62. ^ Scholefield 1950, p. 144.

References

  • Gustafson, Barry (1986). The First 50 Years : A History of the New Zealand National Party. Auckland: Reed Methuen. ISBN 0-474-00177-6. 
  • Scholefield, Guy (1950) [First published in 1913]. New Zealand Parliamentary Record, 1840–1949 (3rd ed.). Wellington: Govt. Printer. 
  • Wilson, James Oakley (1985) [First published in 1913]. New Zealand Parliamentary Record, 1840–1984 (4th ed.). Wellington: V.R. Ward, Govt. Printer. OCLC 154283103. 
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