2013 in New Zealand

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2013 in New Zealand

Decades:
See also:

The following lists events that happened during 2013 in New Zealand.

Population

National

Estimated populations as at 30 June.[1]

Main urban areas

Estimated populations as at 30 June.[1]

Incumbents

Regal and vice-regal

Government

2013 is the second full year of the 50th Parliament, which first sat on 20 December 2011 and will dissolve on 17 December 2014 if not dissolved prior. The Fifth National Government, first elected in 2008, continues.

Other Party leaders

Judiciary

Main centre leaders

Local elections for all city and district councils are held on 12 October.

Arts and Literature

Performing Arts

Benny Award presented by the Variety Artists Club of New Zealand to Larry Morris.

Events

January

February

March

  • 5 March – The 2013 New Zealand census of Population and Dwellings is held, a replacement for the 2011 census that was cancelled after the February 2011 Christchurch earthquake.[4]
  • 20 March – Popular breakfast spread Marmite returns to supermarket shelves, albeit still in limited supply, ending "Marmageddon". The sole production line had stopped in November 2011 due to earthquake damage at the Christchurch factory, which resulted in stocks running out in March 2012.

April

May

  • 20 May – A morning peak commuter train derails on the approach to Wellington Railway Station, puncturing a hole in a carriage's floor in the process. Four people are injured and thousands of commuters are stranded as the line into the city is blocked.[8]

June

  • 20–21 June – Wellington is hit by a storm, described to be the worst since the 1968 Wahine storm, with winds reaching 200 km/h. Thousands of homes lose power and part of the Hutt Valley rail line is washed out, causing severe congestion on roads for a week while it is repaired.
  • 29 June – Meka Whaitiri wins the Ikaroa-Rāwhiti by-election, replacing the late Parekura Horomia.

July

August

September

  • 15 September – David Cunliffe is elected leader of the Labour Party.
  • 29 September – The Lower North Island and East Cape complete digital television transition when analogue television signals are switched off at 3:00 am.[7]

October

  • 7 October – After an appeal to the Privy Council, Mark Lundy's conviction for killing his wife and daughter in August 2000 is quashed and a retrial ordered.[10]
  • 12 October – Elections held for all local councils, regional councils and district health boards.[11]

November

December

  • 1 December – The Upper North Island becomes the last region to complete digital television transition bringing to an end 53 years of analogue television broadcasts in New Zealand.[7]
  • 11 December – New Zealand's population reaches the 4,500,000 mark, according to Statistics New Zealand estimates.[12]

Future and predicted events

Holidays and observances

Sport

Awards

Shooting

Births

Deaths

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

  • 8 September – Loo-Chi Hu, marine equipment designer, t'ai chi teacher (born 1924)
  • 10 September – Mel Cooke, rugby league player (born 1934)
  • 11 September
  • 18 September – Roy McLennan, politician, mayor of Nelson (1971–80) (born 1924)
  • 19 September – Bob Wallace, test driver, automotive engineer (born 1938)
  • 27 September – Larry Savage, rugby union player (born 1928)

October

November

  • 5 November – Ian Irvine, rugby union player, disability rights advocate (born 1929)
  • 6 November – Peter Fatialofa, rugby union player and coach (born 1959)
  • 11 November – William Fyfe, geologist (born 1927)
  • 15 November – Keith Cumberpatch, field hockey player (born 1927)

December

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Subnational Population Estimates: At 30 June 2014 (provisional)". Statistics New Zealand. 22 October 2014. Retrieved 2 November 2014.  Also "Infoshare; Group: Population Estimates – DPE; Table: Estimated Resident Population for Urban Areas, at 30 June (1996+) (Annual-Jun)". Statistics New Zealand. 22 October 2014. Retrieved 2 November 2014. 
  2. ^ Lt Gen The Rt Hon Sir Jerry Mateparae Archived 3 June 2012 at the Wayback Machine.. Governor-General of New Zealand. Retrieved 8 June 2012
  3. ^ "Callaghan Innovation". Ministry of Business, Innovation & Employment. 1 February 2013. 
  4. ^ "2013 Census". Statistics New Zealand. Retrieved 1 January 2013. 
  5. ^ "Three die on roads over Easter". 3 News NZ. 2 April 2013. 
  6. ^ Davison, Isaac (14 March 2013). "Gay bill bolts over hurdle". The New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 14 March 2013. 
  7. ^ a b c "When is my area going digital?". Going Digital. Archived from the original on 17 October 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2013. 
  8. ^ "Wellington trains stopped after derailment". Fairfax NZ News. 20 May 2013. Retrieved 20 May 2013. 
  9. ^ "Labour leader David Shearer steps down". The New Zealand Herald. 22 August 2013. Retrieved 24 September 2013. 
  10. ^ "Mark Lundy murder convictions quashed". Fairfax New Zealand. 7 October 2013. Retrieved 4 July 2014. 
  11. ^ "2013 Local Elections FAQs". Electoral Commission. Archived from the original on 29 August 2012. Retrieved 1 January 2013. 
  12. ^ Manning, Brendan; Tait, Morgan (12 December 2013). "NZ population growth: Baby makes 4.5 million". The New Zealand Herald. Auckland. Retrieved 12 December 2013. 
  13. ^ "New Zealand champion shot / Ballinger Belt winners". National Rifle Association of New Zealand. Archived from the original on 25 January 2015. Retrieved 18 April 2014. 
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