This is a good article. Follow the link for more information.

2013 Monaco GP2 Series round

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Monaco    2013 Monaco GP2 round
Round details
Round 4 of 11 rounds in the
2013 GP2 Series
Circuit de Monaco
Circuit de Monaco
Location Circuit de Monaco, Monte Carlo, Monaco
Course Street circuit
3.340 km (2.075 mi)
Feature race
Date 24 May 2013
Laps 42
Pole position
Driver Venezuela Johnny Cecotto Jr. Arden International
Time 1:21.195
Podium
First United Kingdom Sam Bird Russian Time
Second Italy Kevin Ceccon Trident Racing
Third New Zealand Mitch Evans Arden International
Fastest lap
Driver Monaco Stefano Coletti Rapax
Time 1:23.665 (on lap 9)
Sprint race
Date 25 May 2013
Laps 30
Podium
First Monaco Stefano Coletti Rapax
Second United Kingdom Adrian Quaife-Hobbs MP Motorsport
Third New Zealand Mitch Evans Arden International
Fastest lap
Driver Monaco Stefano Coletti Rapax
Time 1:22.853 (on lap 8)

The 2013 Monaco GP2 Series round was a pair of motor races held on 24 and 25 May 2013 at the Circuit de Monaco, Monte Carlo, Monaco as part of the GP2 Series. It was the fourth round of the 2013 GP2 Series and was run in support of the 2013 Monaco Grand Prix. The first race, a 42-lap feature event, was won by Russian Time driver Sam Bird who started from third position. Kevin Ceccon finished second for the Trident Racing team and Arden International driver Mitch Evans came in third. Stefano Coletti of the Rapax team won the second event, a 30-lap sprint race, ahead of MP Motorsport's Adrian Quaife-Hobbs in second and Evans third.

Johnny Cecotto Jr. won the pole position for the feature race by setting the fastest lap in qualifying, but lost the lead to teammate Evans heading into the first corner. Cecotto then understeered into the barrier while holding off Fabio Leimer and Jolyon Palmer spun in avoidance causing the turn to be blocked and the race was stopped because fifteen cars were stranded. Evans led the restarted race but lost the place to Bird after the pit stop phase. Bird opened up a healthy advantage over the rest of the field to win the race. Quaife-Hobbs started from pole position in the sprint race and kept the lead until Coletti passed him on the third lap. Although his lead diminished because of tyre wear Coletti led the remaining laps of the event to secure the victory.

Bird's feature race victory was his—and Russian Time's—second of the season and Coletti's sprint race win meant he became the first Monegasque driver to win on the streets of Monaco since Louis Chiron in 1931. The race results resulted in Coletti increasing his lead at the top of the Drivers' Championship to 24 points ahead of Felipe Nasr. Bird's feature race win meant he gained two positions to move into third while Leimer dropped to fourth. Rapax took over the lead of the Teams' Championship from Carlin and Russian Time's strong results enabled the company to take over third place. Racing Engineering rounded out the top four with seven rounds left in the season.

Report

Background

Circuit de Monaco, where the race was held.

The 2013 Monaco GP2 Series round was the fourth of eleven scheduled events in 2013. It was held on 24 and 25 May at the Circuit de Monaco in Monte Carlo and was run in support of the 2013 Monaco Grand Prix.[1] The races were contested by thirteen teams of two drivers each. The teams were: DAMS, Carlin, ART Grand Prix, Racing Engineering, Russian Time, Trident, Addax, MP Motorsport, Rapax, Arden International, Caterham Racing, Hilmer Motorsport and Lazarus.[2][3] Tyre supplier Pirelli brought two types of tyre to the race: two dry compounds (supersoft "options" and soft "primes"). The supersoft tyres were identified by a red stripe on their side-walls, and the soft tyres were similarly identified in yellow.[4]

Before the race Rapax driver Stefano Coletti led the Drivers' Championship with 93 points, seventeen ahead of nearest rival Felipe Nasr in second, who in turn, was a further eighteen points in front of Fabio Leimer in third. Robin Frijns was fourth on 33 points and Sam Bird was four points behind the driver in fifth place.[5] Carlin were leading the Teams' Championship on 107 points; Rapax had a small deficit of six points in second and Racing Engineering were third with 64 points. Hilmer Motorsports were fourth on 56 points and Russian Time were one point behind in the battle for the position.[5] Leimer (Racing Engineering) and Coletti (Rapax) had so far dominated the championship with Bird and Frijns winning one race each. James Calado and Nasr had taken at least one second place finish and Mitch Evans, Alexander Rossi and Jon Lancaster had all finished third once.[5] After his strong start to the season, Frijns confirmed on Twitter that he would contest the Monaco round as his contract with Hilmer Motorsports was on a race-by-race basis.[6]

Practice and qualifying

Sam Bird (pictured in 2012) set the fastest lap in practice and qualified in third position before going on to win the feature race.

One 30-minute practice session was held on Thursday before the two races.[7] Bird, who called the Circuit de Monaco his favourite track in the GP2 Series, was the fastest driver with a time of one minute and 21.512 seconds on super-soft tyres, 0.057 seconds faster than teammate Tom Dillmann in second. Evans was third-fastest, ahead of Jolyon Palmer. Marcus Ericsson and Johnny Cecotto Jr. were fifth and sixth. Leimer was seventh-fastest, Nasr eighth, Rio Haryanto ninth and Calado completed the top ten ahead of qualifying.[8] Only minor off-track excursions were reported with Stéphane Richelmi spinning at La Rascasse corner and stalled in his attempt to continue driving.[8] Nasr narrowly avoided impacting the barriers at the Swimming Pool complex and Coletti, Leimer, Calado and Kevin Giovesi all ran deep into the track's run-off areas at various points in the half hour session.[8]

Friday afternoon's qualifying session ran for 30-minutes.[7] As in 2012, qualifying was divided into two groups of thirteen cars, with the odd numbered vehicles in Group A and the even numbered cars in Group B. The starting order was determined by the fastest overall driver in either group.[9] Most cars had the soft types equipped at the start of qualifying and most made pit stops for set-up alterations with some having supersoft tyres installed.[10] Cecotto clinched his first pole position of the season, the second of his career, and his second in Monte Carlo with a time of one minute and 21.141 seconds.[11] He was joined on the grid's front row by teammate Evans who topped Group B but his best time set at the end of qualifying was 0.016 seconds slower than Cecotto and Evans's effort was not enough to earn him pole position.[12] On his final timed lap, Bird was fastest in the first sector, but lost six tenths of a second in the final two sectors and could only muster third.[13] Leimer drifted sideways at the final corner on his fastest lap but did not make contact with the barrier en route to fourth place.[14] Kevin Ceccon took fifth.[11] Palmer's first attempt at going faster proved unsuccessful as he came across Richelmi in the final sector but took it at his next attempt before Leimer demoted him down the order.[14] Palmer eventually took sixth.[12]

Julián Leal took seventh after encountering traffic on his final lap and needed to pass one car to record his fastest time.[10] Dillmann lined up in eighth place.[12] Nasr set the early pace in Group B before settling for ninth and Frijns rounded out the top ten.[11][14] Ericcson was the fastest driver not to qualify in the top ten; his best time of one minute and 22.349 seconds was 1.208 seconds off Cecotto's pace.[12] Ericsson paced Group B early on but was demoted as the session progressed.[14] He was followed by Sergio Canamasas in 12th and Rossi in 13th place.[11] Coletti was another Group B early pace setter but ended up starting from 14th position. Haryanto qualified in 15th but was demoted ten places on the grid for causing an avoidable accident at the previous round of the season in Catalunya.[14] As a result Nathanaël Berthon inherited the place and was followed by Calado. Richelmi and Daniël de Jong filled the next two placings and 20th place qualifier René Binder was given a three-place grid penalty for impeding Canamasas during the session.[11] Giovesi thus started fro Binder's qualifying position with Daniel Abt joining him on the grid's tenth row. Simon Trummer and Jake Rosenzweig clinched the 22nd and 23rd positions.[12] Lancaster started from 24th after spinning his car at Sainte Dévote turn necessitating yellow flags to be waved in the area.[13][14] The final position in the field was taken by Adrian Quaife-Hobbs whose fastest time was 2.2 seconds slower than Cecotto.[12]

Races

The first race was held over a distance of either 140 kilometres (87 mi) or 60 minutes and all drivers were required to make one pit stop. The first ten finishers scored points, with two being awarded to the competitor who recorded the fastest lap. The starting order for the second race was determined by the finishing positions of the first race but with the first eight drivers in reverse order of where they finished. It was run over a distance of either 100 kilometres (62 mi) or 45 minutes and in contrast to the first race drivers were not allowed to make pit stops. The top eight finishers scored points towards their respective championships.[7]

Feature race

Fabio Leimer (pictured in 2015) was caught up in a first lap accident triggered by Johnny Cecotto Jr.

The feature race was due to start at 11:15 Central European Summer Time (UTC+02:00) on 24 May,[9] but was delayed by fifteen minutes due to an incident during qualifying for the Porsche Supercup race in which several cars crashed at Massenet corner. Repairs were required to the barriers at the turn as they had been dislodged and oil laid on the track surface at the same turn was cleaned by course workers using cement dust.[13][15][16] When the race eventually began under overcast and cooler weather conditions with an air temperature of 18 °C (64 °F) and a track temperature of 26 °C (79 °F)[17] Cecotto spun his tyres allowing teammate Evans to lead the field heading into Sainte Dévote turn.[18] Shortly afterwards a fifteen car pile up at the first corner caused the race to be red-flagged to a halt. After losing the lead Cecotto was fending off an attack from Leimer through Sainte Dévote but it was not possible for Cecotto to maintain his line and he understeered straight into the barrier. Leimer was trapped in the manoeuvre and mounted the left-hand corner of Cecotto's car in response. Palmer took avoiding action by spinning on the inside line causing the turn to be blocked.[18][19] Palmer avoided injury when Leal's front wing came close to striking his helmet.[20]

Coletti, Leal, Dillmann, Frijns, Ericsson, Rossi, Berthon, Binder, Giovesi, Haryanto, Rosenzweig and Abt were all trapped in the blockade with varying degrees of car damage.[18] Nasr was near Bird and Ceccon and managed to avoid the collision between Leal and Palmer. Drivers ran back to their cars and remonstrated with marshals to enable them to take the restart.[19] A forty-minute delay was necessitated to allow the track to be cleaned before the race could be restarted.[18] Nine drivers had enough damage to warrant their retirement from the race: Cecotto, Leimer, Palmer, Leal, Frijns, Ericsson, Rossi, Berthon and Giovesi. The running order at the restart was determined by the order of the drivers that went through the first sector with the cars that did not enter being put in their starting position.[20] This meant Evans led the field behind the safety car followed by Bird, Ceccon, Nasr and Calado. The safety car was withdrawn at the end of lap two and racing resumed with Evans leading Bird.[19] Both drivers opened up a two-second advantage over Ceccon, Nasr, Calado and Richelmi.[18] Although Evans had switched to the supersoft tyres during the stoppage Bird set consecutive fastest laps of the race on the soft tyres.[19]

Rio Haryanto (pictured in 2011) was forced into retirement after Daniel Abt punted him into the barriers.

As they had been compromised by the first lap pileup and were at the back of the field, Dillmann and Coletti chose to make their mandatory pit stops when the window opened at the end of the seventh lap for rear soft compound tyres.[18][20] Haryanto and Abt made their stops on the next lap and Calado and Lancaster did the same on lap nine. Coletti's early pit stop resulted in him lapping faster than any other driver by two seconds. Other drivers became aware of the significance and Nasr went into the pit lane to keep his position from Calado and Ceccon and Richelmi did the same on the eleventh lap. This placed pressure on race leader Evans who was at this point three seconds a lap slower than Ceccon.[18] Evans made his own pit stop on lap 12 for four soft compound tyres but did not retain first place as Ceccon made up enough time to move in front of him.[20] Evans could not keep close to Ceccon and was three seconds behind the driver after one lap and his diminishing pace hurt the delayed Bird who became the leader when Evans made his pit stop.[18] On lap 15, De Jong made a problematic pit stop: his rear jack failed which delayed him and then crossed the yellow line at the pit lane exit twice, earning him a drive-through penalty.[19][20]

Bird set fast laps while leading and kept the lead after his pit stop at the end of the 16th lap ahead of the yet-to-stop Binder, Ceccon and Evans.[18][20] Bird was pushing when he slid after clipping the kerb on the track and glanced the barrier leaving Portier turn on lap 18.[19] Abt was attacking Haryanto for 13th position on lap 28 and went to the outside of Haryanto by braking later than he did.[18][20] The resulting manoeuvre meant Abt punted Haryanto into the inside barrier with his car's front nose being broken as a consequence.[18] The need for the safety car was avoided as Haryanto's car was extracted from the track quickly.[19] Abt was adjudged to have been too aggressive towards Haryanto by the stewards and was handed a drive-through penalty and was shown a black flag with an orange disc requiring him to make repairs to his car.[20] Dillmann attempted to pass Rosenzweig but ran deep at the Novelle Chicane. He was required to hand the position back to Rosenzweig. Binder made his pit stop on the 29th lap and emerged in seventh place behind Coletti.[18] Bird continued to lead with a seventeen-second advantage over Ceccon who was fending off the faster Evans in third position who himself had Nasr and Calado close behind him.[19]

Bird was able to further open up a twenty-two second lead over the rest of the field and maintained it for the remainder of the race to secure the victory. Ceccon finished one with one second covering Evans in third and Nasr in fourth; Evans narrowly fended off Nasr for the final podium place. Calado secured fifth with Coletti taking sixth and Binder seventh.[20] Quaife-Hobbs passed Richemi for eighth place in the final stages of the race and thus earned the sprint race pole position.[18] Richelmi and De Jong rounded out the top-ten points-scoring positions.[20] Dillmann, Lancaster, Trummer, Rosenzweig and Canamasas took the next five places and Abt was the last of the classified finishers.[3] It was Bird's third win in the GP2 Series,[3] his (and Russian Time's) second of the season, and his first victory at the circuit since his 2012 Formula Renault 3.5 Series Monaco round triumph.[21] After the race, the stewards deemed Cecotto responsible for causing the first lap accident that triggered the race's sole stoppage and Cecotto was barred from competing in the following day's sprint event.[20]

Sprint race

The second race began at 16:10 local time on 25 May.[17] Weather conditions at the start of the event were cooler than the previous day's race with light rain falling.[19] The air temperature was 17 °C (63 °F) and the track temperature was 25 °C (77 °F).[2] Most cars on the grid started on the soft compound tyres.[19] When the race started, pole sitter Quaife-Hobbs maintained his startline advantage heading into Sainte Dévote corner while Coletti moved into second place as Binder was slow leaving the grid and fell to sixth.[22] Calado initially held third place,[22] but Evans overtook him around the outside at Mirabeau turn to move into the position.[23] Nasr passed Calado at the start of the following lap at Sainte Dévote corner for fourth position.[19][22] Having been close behind Quaife-Hobbs in the race's opening stages,[24] Coletti pressured the Quaife-Hobbs by using his local knowledge to apply pressure on the latter. Coletti lined up an overtaking manoeuvre on Quaife-Hobbs on the third lap leaving the tunnel and heading into the Novelle Chicane.[22] He steered right onto the inside line and braked later than Quaife-Hobbs to pass him for the lead.[23][24] Coletti began to pull away from Quaife-Hobbs, setting the fastest lap of the race at that point on the fourth lap to be 2.1 seconds ahead of Quaife-Hobbs.[24]

Stefano Coletti (pictured in 2010) became the first Monesaque driver to win his home event since Louis Chiron in 1931.

Quaife-Hobbs focused himself on holding off the closing Evans, Nasr and Calado. Dillmann was forced to go two laps behind the leader on the seventh lap after he sustained car damage. Bird was in seventh but was challenged by Ceccon who put his car on the line entering the Novelle Chicane forcing Bird to overshoot the corner to avoid colliding with him. Bird was aware that his move would entail a drive-through penalty and thus yielded seventh place to Ceccon. Bird was immediately attacked by Richelmi but it became evident that Bird's car was suffering from a major problem. Bird lost further positions before entering the pit lane for technical assistance that put him one lap behind the race leader.[22] He thus set the fastest lap of the race on supersoft tyres but as he was outside of the top ten he did not score the point entailed by the achievement.[19][23] Palmer overtook Canamasas on lap 13 in a carbon-copy move to Abt's manoevure on Haryanto in the previous day's race. But on this occasion both drivers continued without any significant damage.[22][24] Quaife-Hobbs was able to fend off the three-car train and appeared stronger as the race progressed and the tyres degraded.[22]

As the field became tightly packed, no driver had the advantage of getting the edge for moving up the field. This was the case until Rosenzweig stuck the front-end of his car down the inside of Lancaster through the Lowe's hairpin and tapped Lancaster into a half-spin. Rosenzweig's move enabled him to move into tenth while Lancaster could not recover sufficiently from the incident and lost five places in two corners.[22][23] Coletti's control of the lead was waning because tyre degradation removed some of his earlier fast pace and handling, causing his lead over Quaife-Hobbs to be reduced to one second. Less than four seconds covered the first five runners with a 14-second gap over a battle for sixth place between Binder, Ceccon and Richelmi. Coletti had help from Quaife-Hobbs who was defending from Evans and by this point the track was completely dry with no rain falling.[22] Evans made another attempt at taking second place on the final lap, almost going into the rear-end of Quaife-Hobbs's car as the pair left the Novelle Chicane.[24] Coletti maintained the lead for the rest of the race to win.[19] Coletti's victory made him the first Monegasque driver to win on the streets of Monaco since Louis Chiron in the 1931 Monaco Grand Prix.[23] Quaife-Hobbs finished in second position, three-tenths of a second ahead of Evans in third and Nasr took fourth. Calado secured fifth, Binder took sixth, Ceccon clinched seventh and Richelmi rounded out the top eight points-scoring positions.[24] De Jong, Rosenzweig, Canamasas, Palmer, Leimer, Leal, Frijns, Haryanto, Lancaster, Ericcson, Rossi, Giovesi, Berthon, Abt, Trummer, Bird and Dillmann were the last of the classified finishers.[23]

Post-race

The top three drivers in both races appeared on the podium to collect their trophies and in a later press conference. Although Bird spoke of his satisfaction of controlling the pace of the feature race, he believed he was fortunate because of him receiving a new rear wing after being impacted by Ceccon at the first start, "It’s an amazing to be able to win my first GP2 race in Monaco. Maybe I should have done it already in the past in GP2, but it felt pretty right today."[25] Ceccon stated he was "happy" to secure second place and praised his team for his strategy that enabled him to move ahead of Evans, " It’s my first GP2 podium and it’s two years in a row that I finish on the podium here since I finished third last year in GP3 here as well. Today, I finished in P2 in race 1. It’s good."[25] When asked if he was disappointed over his third place finish, Evans replied yes as he struggled with grip on his supersoft compound tyres at the restart and was being pressured by Bird on the harder soft compound tyres.[25] Evans believed that had he overtaken Ceccon he could have had similar pace levels to Bird and felt the best possible result he could have achieved was second but stated he would accept the result.[25]

Jolyon Palmer (pictured in 2012), a vocal critic of Cecotto's driving in the feature race.

After the sprint race, Coletti spoke of his childhood dream of hearing the Monegasque national anthem while standing on the top step of the Monaco podium, "It feels great I mean I’ve seen all the drivers winning here since I was a kid. I’m really, really happy especially that with this win I’ve consolidated my lead in the standings."[26] He said for the season's next race at Silverstone his team need to improve his car in qualifying trim and then aim to secure victory in the feature race.[26] Quaife-Hobbs said it felt "amazing" to clinch his first career podium, "Today, it’s a great reward for the team and how hard they’ve worked. We are a new team. Now every new team have had a podium."[26] Quaife-Hobbs believed if he had defended from Coletti on the third lap both drivers would not have entered the Novelle Chicane and affirmed that he elected to follow Coletti with the view for a attack later in the race.[26] Third-place finisher Evans revealed on the formation lap he struggled to get the optimum rear tyre temperature especially since the start of the race was the best time to gain track position and was aware that finishing on the podium would probably not be realistic. Nevertheless he was happy to have again finished on the Monaco podium after altering his car.[26]

Cecotto's driving which caused the multi-car pileup in the feature race received much attention.[27] It was third such incident in the season when Cecotto courted controversy and criticism from drivers: he was disqualified from qualifying for the Sepang round when he forced Bird off the track but avoided being issued with a penalty in the Catalunya sprint race when he swerved into Canamasas during a battle for fifth position.[28] Leimer claimed that Cecotto solely concentrated on him rather than making the corner, "It's really, really disappointing as a lot was possible today and I could have scored a lot of points. But once more due to another driver I lost out, while my competitors in the battle for the championship are scoring."[17] Palmer was more vocal in his criticism in Cecotto, remarking he would rather start from the pit lane than within two rows of Cecotto.[16] Peter Allen of Formula Scout argued that while Cecotto's manoeuvre was not clearly malicious in intent, the Venezuelan deserved the race ban and that it would help him realise that he needed to control his aggressiveness.[27]

The result of the round meant Coletti increased his advantage at the lead of the Drivers' Championship on 120 points. Nasr remained in second place, 24 points behind Coletti, while Bird's feature race victory enabled him to move into third position. Because he did not score any points in the two races, Leimer fell to fourth and Calado gained three positions to rounded out the top five.[5] Rapax took over the lead of the Teams' Championship and were a solitary point ahead of previous leaders Carlin. Russian Time's form enabled the company to move into third place on 80 points and were a further sixteen in front of fourth-placed Racing Engineering. Arden took over fifth place with seven rounds left in the season.[5]

Classification

Qualifying

Group A
Pos. No. Driver Team Time Grid
1 5 Venezuela Johnny Cecotto Jr. Arden International 1:21.141 1
2 11 United Kingdom Sam Bird Russian Time 1:21.509 3
3 21 Italy Kevin Ceccon Trident Racing 1:21.986 5
4 7 Colombia Julián Leal Racing Engineering 1:22.092 7
5 9 Brazil Felipe Nasr Carlin 1:22.163 9
6 1 Sweden Marcus Ericsson DAMS 1:22.349 11
7 15 United States Alexander Rossi Caterham Racing 1:22.511 13
8 17 Indonesia Rio Haryanto Barwa Addax 1:22.589 251
9 3 United Kingdom James Calado ART Grand Prix 1:22.677 16
10 27 Netherlands Daniël de Jong MP Motorsport 1:22.943 18
11 25 Italy Kevin Giovesi Lazarus 1:23.006 19
12 19 Switzerland Simon Trummer Rapax 1:23.017 21
13 23 United Kingdom Jon Lancaster Hilmer Motorsport 1:23.443 24
Source:[11]
Group B
Pos. No. Driver Team Time Grid
1 6 New Zealand Mitch Evans Arden International 1:21.157 2
2 8 Switzerland Fabio Leimer Racing Engineering 1:21.185 4
3 10 United Kingdom Jolyon Palmer Carlin 1:21.198 6
4 12 France Tom Dillmann Russian Time 1:21.387 8
5 22 Netherlands Robin Frijns Hilmer Motorsport 1:21.418 10
6 14 Spain Sergio Canamasas Caterham Racing 1:21.522 12
7 18 Monaco Stefano Coletti Rapax 1:21.658 14
8 20 France Nathanaël Berthon Trident Racing 1:22.245 15
9 2 Monaco Stéphane Richelmi DAMS 1:22.317 17
10 24 Austria René Binder Lazarus 1:22.376 222
11 4 Germany Daniel Abt ART Grand Prix 1:22.716 20
12 16 United States Jake Rosenzweig Barwa Addax 1:22.842 23
13 26 United Kingdom Adrian Quaife-Hobbs MP Motorsport 1:23.328 26
Source:[11]

Notes:

  • ^1Rio Haryanto received a ten-place grid penalty for causing a collision at the previous race.[14]
  • ^2René Binder was penalised three places for impeding Canamasas during qualifying.[14]

Feature race

Pos. No. Driver Team Laps Time/Retired Grid Points
1 11 United Kingdom Sam Bird Russian Time 42 1:36:15.919 3 25
2 21 Italy Kevin Ceccon Trident Racing 42 +22.077 5 18
3 6 New Zealand Mitch Evans Arden International 42 +23.225 2 15
4 9 Brazil Felipe Nasr Carlin 42 +23.416 9 12
5 3 United Kingdom James Calado ART Grand Prix 42 +29.588 16 10
6 18 Monaco Stefano Coletti Rapax 42 +1:00.519 14 10 (8+2)
7 24 Austria René Binder Lazarus 42 +1:02.449 22 6
8 26 United Kingdom Adrian Quaife-Hobbs MP Motorsport 42 +1:08.400 26 4
9 2 Monaco Stéphane Richelmi DAMS 42 +1:12.107 17 2
10 27 Netherlands Daniël de Jong MP Motorsport 42 +1:22.410 18 1
11 12 France Tom Dillmann Russian Time 42 +1:29.356 8
12 23 United Kingdom Jon Lancaster Hilmer Motorsport 41 +1 lap 24
13 19 Switzerland Simon Trummer Rapax 41 +1 lap 21
14 16 United States Jake Rosenzweig Barwa Addax 41 +1 lap 23
15 14 Spain Sergio Canamasas Caterham Racing 40 +2 laps 12
16 4 Germany Daniel Abt ART Grand Prix 40 +2 laps 20
Ret 17 Indonesia Rio Haryanto Barwa Addax 26 Accident 25
Ret 5 Venezuela Johnny Cecotto Jr. Arden International 0 Accident 1
Ret 8 Switzerland Fabio Leimer Racing Engineering 0 Accident 4
Ret 10 United Kingdom Jolyon Palmer Carlin 0 Accident 6
Ret 7 Colombia Julián Leal Racing Engineering 0 Accident 7
Ret 22 Netherlands Robin Frijns Hilmer Motorsport 0 Accident 10
Ret 1 Sweden Marcus Ericsson DAMS 0 Accident 11
Ret 15 United States Alexander Rossi Caterham Racing 0 Accident 13
Ret 20 France Nathanaël Berthon Trident Racing 0 Accident 15
Ret 25 Italy Kevin Giovesi Lazarus 0 Accident 19
Fastest lap: Stefano Coletti (Rapax) — 1:23.665 (on lap 9)
Bold indicates the drivers who finished in the points-scoring positions
Source:[21]

Sprint race

Pos. No. Driver Team Laps Time/Retired Grid Points
1 18 Monaco Stefano Coletti Rapax 30 42.50.707 3 17 (15+2)
2 26 United Kingdom Adrian Quaife-Hobbs MP Motorsport 30 +1.869 1 12
3 6 New Zealand Mitch Evans Arden International 30 +2.218 6 10
4 9 Brazil Felipe Nasr Carlin 30 +2.536 5 8
5 3 United Kingdom James Calado ART Grand Prix 30 +3.747 4 6
6 24 Austria René Binder Lazarus 30 +19.293 2 4
7 21 Italy Kevin Ceccon Trident Racing 30 +20.015 7 2
8 2 Monaco Stéphane Richelmi DAMS 30 +20.576 9 1
9 27 Netherlands Daniël de Jong MP Motorsport 30 +21.197 10
10 16 United States Jake Rosenzweig Barwa Addax 30 +31.720 14
11 14 Spain Sergio Canamasas Caterham Racing 30 +34.105 15
12 10 United Kingdom Jolyon Palmer Carlin 30 +35.775 19
13 8 Switzerland Fabio Leimer Racing Engineering 30 +36.488 18
14 7 Colombia Julián Leal Racing Engineering 30 +36.913 20
15 22 Netherlands Robin Frijns Hilmer Motorsport 30 +42.125 21
16 17 Indonesia Rio Haryanto Barwa Addax 30 +43.235 17
17 23 United Kingdom Jon Lancaster Hilmer Motorsport 30 +1:03.893 12
18 1 Sweden Marcus Ericsson DAMS 30 +1:04.258 22
19 15 United States Alexander Rossi Caterham Racing 30 +1:04.735 23
20 25 Italy Kevin Giovesi Lazarus 30 +1:05.044 25
21 20 France Nathanaël Berthon Trident Racing 30 +1:05.468 24
22 4 Germany Daniel Abt ART Grand Prix 30 +1:06.174 16
23 19 Switzerland Simon Trummer Rapax 30 +1:07.413 13
24 11 United Kingdom Sam Bird Russian Time 29 +1 lap 8
25 12 France Tom Dillmann Russian Time 27 +3 laps 11
EX 5 Venezuela Johnny Cecotto Jr. Arden International Excluded3
Fastest lap: Stefano Coletti (Rapax) — 1:22.853 (on lap 8)
Bold indicates the drivers who finished in the points-scoring positions
Source:[2]

Notes:

Standings after the race

  • Note: Only the top five positions are included for both sets of standings.

References

  1. ^ "2013 GP2 calendar revealed". ESPN. 19 December 2012. Archived from the original on 18 September 2017. Retrieved 15 September 2017. 
  2. ^ a b c "GP2 – 2013 – Monte Carlo results, sprintrennen". motorsport-total.com (in German). Archived from the original on 29 September 2013. Retrieved 16 September 2017. 
  3. ^ a b c Khorounzhiy, Valentin (24 May 2013). "Bird flies to Monaco win after first lap pile-up". Formula Scout. Archived from the original on 18 September 2017. Retrieved 16 September 2017. 
  4. ^ "A wide variety of GP2 strategies at work in Monaco". Pirelli. 26 May 2013. Archived from the original on 18 September 2017. Retrieved 15 September 2017. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g "GP2 – 2013 Standings". nextgen-auto.com. Archived from the original on 14 December 2013. Retrieved 15 September 2017. 
  6. ^ "Frijns confirms Hilmer seat for Monaco". GPUpdate. 21 May 2013. Archived from the original on 17 March 2015. Retrieved 15 September 2017. 
  7. ^ a b c "The Regulations". GP2 Series. Archived from the original on 17 October 2013. Retrieved 15 September 2017. 
  8. ^ a b c Bradley, Charles (23 May 2013). "Monaco GP2: Sam Bird leads Russian Time 1-2 in practice". Autosport. Archived from the original on 26 February 2015. Retrieved 15 September 2017. 
  9. ^ a b Fischer, Norman (23 May 2013). "Nach Kritik: Cecotto gibt mit Monaco-Pole die richtige Antwort". motorsport-total.com (in German). Archived from the original on 17 June 2013. Retrieved 15 September 2017. 
  10. ^ a b "Racing Engineering and Fabio Leimer qualify 4th at Monaco". Racing Engineering. 23 May 2013. Archived from the original on 17 August 2014. Retrieved 15 September 2017. 
  11. ^ a b c d e f g Khorounzhiy, Valentin (23 May 2013). "Cecotto leads Evans in Arden 1-2 at Monte Carlo". Formula Scout. Archived from the original on 19 September 2017. Retrieved 15 September 2017. 
  12. ^ a b c d e f Bradley, Charles (23 May 2013). "Monaco GP2: Cecotto edges Arden team-mate Evans for pole". Autosport. Archived from the original on 18 September 2017. Retrieved 15 September 2017. 
  13. ^ a b c Esler, William (23 May 2013). "Arden's Johnny Cecotto takes pole for GP2 Feature Race in Monaco". Sky Sports. Archived from the original on 18 September 2017. Retrieved 15 September 2017. 
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h Lewin, Andrew (23 May 2013). "GP2 Monaco 2013 : Arden locks-out Friday feature front row". crash.net. Archived from the original on 18 September 2017. Retrieved 15 September 2017. 
  15. ^ Arron, Simon (24 May 2013). "Monaco Grand Prix – day two". Motor Sport. Archived from the original on 18 September 2017. Retrieved 16 September 2017. 
  16. ^ a b Medland, Chris (24 May 2013). "Bird takes dominant Monaco victory". ESPN. Archived from the original on 18 September 2017. Retrieved 16 September 2017. 
  17. ^ a b c "Opening lap accident at Monaco eliminates both Racing Engineering cars". Racing Engineering. 24 May 2013. Archived from the original on 21 August 2014. Retrieved 16 September 2017. 
  18. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Lewin, Andrew (24 May 2013). "GP2 Monaco 2013: Lucky Bird escapes T1 pile-up to win". crash.net. Archived from the original on 18 September 2017. Retrieved 16 September 2017. 
  19. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Elizade, Pablo; Beer, Matt; Tremayne, Sam; Glendenning, Mark; Freeman, Glenn; Simmons, Marcus (23 May 2014). "As it happened: Weekend test 2". Autosport. Archived from the original on 18 September 2017. Retrieved 16 September 2017. 
  20. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Esler, William (24 May 2013). "Sam Bird takes GP2 Feature Race victory in Monaco". Sky Sports. Archived from the original on 18 September 2017. Retrieved 16 September 2017. 
  21. ^ a b Bradley, Charles (23 May 2013). "Monaco GP2: Sam Bird wins in Monte Carlo again". Autosport. Archived from the original on 18 September 2017. Retrieved 16 September 2017. 
  22. ^ a b c d e f g h i Lewin, Andrew (25 May 2013). "GP2 Monaco 2013: Stefano Coletti makes himself at home". crash.net. Archived from the original on 18 September 2017. Retrieved 16 September 2017. 
  23. ^ a b c d e f Medland, Chris (24 May 2013). "Coletti wins home sprint race". ESPN. Archived from the original on 18 September 2017. Retrieved 16 September 2017. 
  24. ^ a b c d e f Esler, William (24 May 2013). "Stefano Coletti wins GP2 Sprint Race on home soil in Monaco". Sky Sports. Archived from the original on 18 September 2017. Retrieved 16 September 2017. 
  25. ^ a b c d "Monte Carlo post feature race quotes". GP2 Series. 24 May 2013. Archived from the original on 15 June 2013. Retrieved 17 September 2017. 
  26. ^ a b c d e "Monte Carlo post Sprint Race quotes". GP2 Series. 25 May 2013. Archived from the original on 8 June 2013. Retrieved 17 September 2017. 
  27. ^ a b Allen, Peter (24 May 2013). "Cecotto banned from Monaco sprint race after causing pile-up". Formula Scout. Archived from the original on 19 September 2017. Retrieved 17 September 2017. 
  28. ^ a b Estrada, Chris (24 May 2013). "Start of GP2 race in Monaco marred by 14-car crash". NBC Sports. Archived from the original on 18 September 2017. Retrieved 17 September 2017. 

External links

  • Official website


Previous round:
2013 Catalunya GP2 round
GP2 Series
2013 season
Next round:
2013 Silverstone GP2 round
Previous round:
2012 Monaco GP2 round
Monaco GP2 round Next round:
2014 Monaco GP2 round
Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=2013_Monaco_GP2_Series_round&oldid=810848160"
This content was retrieved from Wikipedia : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2013_Monaco_GP2_Series_round
This page is based on the copyrighted Wikipedia article "2013 Monaco GP2 Series round"; it is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-SA). You may redistribute it, verbatim or modified, providing that you comply with the terms of the CC-BY-SA