2+2 (TV channel)

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2+2
2+2 logo 2017.svg
Owned by 1+1 Media Group
Picture format 16:9 (576i, SDTV)
Country Ukraine
Language Ukrainian
Broadcast area Ukraine
Headquarters Kiev, Ukraine
Website 2plus2.ua
Availability
Terrestrial
DVB-T2 MX-3 (21)

2+2 (Ukrainian: два плюс два, dva plyus dva) is a national Ukrainian-language TV channel, owned by the 1+1 Media Group. Its program content is mainly geared for a male audience, targeting a core audience is 25–44 years old.

Due to the Crimean crisis 2014, 2+2 broadcasts in Sevastopol ended on 9 March 2014, at 2.30pm East European time.[1]

2+2 offers broadcasts of sporting events, particularly football and boxing matches, foreign and Russian TV series, movies of different genres (action/smash hit movies, sci-fi, adventures, comedies, detectives, horror movies, disaster movies, historical and criminal dramas, and thrillers), cartoons and humorous programs, sports and entertainment shows of in-house production and erotica.[2]

History

The TV channel “2+2” was launched in July, 2006, as the channel “Kino”; in summer of 2010, it changed its name and positioning. For six years of its broadcasts, technical penetration of the channel in the cities with the population over 50 thousand people has increased from 18.5% to 89.3% and exceeded 83.7%, Ukraine-wide. The share of the channel’s viewers amounts to 2.7% in prime time (19:00-23:00) and 2.6% per whole day for the audience aged between 18 and 54 years in the cities with the population over 50 thousand people.[3]

In 2009, 2+2 TV channel, then known under the logo of “Kino,” received the prize from the specialized magazine Mediasat as the Best Movie Channel.

In 2011, it received the Mediasat award as the Best Regional TV Channel.

In 2012, 2+2 was awarded by Mediaset as the Best Men’s Channel, and also received the rights to broadcast matches of the UEFA Champions League and UEFA Europa League of season 2012-2015. Since the autumn of 2012, live streams of Football Championship of Ukraine, UEFA Champions League and UEFA Europa League games are available for viewing on the channel’s site.

Criticism

Since 2014 "2+2" TV channel was criticised for broadcasting Russian serials. According to the results of monitoring made by "Boycott Russian Films" campaign activists during the period from 8th to 14 September there was demonstrated 8 hours of Russian content per day.[4][5] According to monitoring made on 27 September the part of Russian content on the channel took 42%.[6]

Football programs

The channel 2+2 is the official broadcaster of the Ukrainian Premier League. Since 30 August 2010, there is summary football program ProFootball (uk) every Sunday. Ihor Tsyganyk is the key football journalist of the channel. Invited experts are Andriy Nesmachnyi (former), Viktor Leonenko (former), Serhiy Kandaurov, Serhiy Nahornyak, Ihor Shukhovtsev, Oleh Venhlinskyi, Maksym Kalynychenko, Eduard Tsykhmeystruk, Oleksandr Ishchenko.[7]

Programming

References

  1. ^ Dmitry Tymchuk, Facebook, translation Vladimir Germanov
  2. ^ "1+1 Media Group page". 1+1 Group. Retrieved 18 August 2014.
  3. ^ "1+1 Media Group page". 1+1 Group. Retrieved 18 August 2014.
  4. ^ Російське кіно все ще домінує на українському телепросторі (in Ukrainian). Espreso TV. 09.09.2014
  5. ^ Українські канали показують у день по 7,5 годин російських передач (in Ukrainian). Tvoye misto. 23.09.2014
  6. ^ Кількість російського контенту на українських екранах збільшується, - дослідження (in Ukrainian). Espreso TV. 30.09.2014
  7. ^ https://2plus2.ua/profutbol

External links

  • Official website
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