1995 in baseball

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The following are the baseball events of the year 1995 throughout the world.

List of years in baseball

Champions

Major League Baseball

  Division Series
ABC/NBC
League Championship Series
ABC/NBC
World Series
ABC/NBC
                           
  West Seattle Mariners 3  
WC New York Yankees 2  
  West Seattle Mariners 2  
American League
  Central Cleveland Indians 4  
Central Cleveland Indians 3
  East Boston Red Sox 0  
    AL Cleveland Indians 2
  NL Atlanta Braves 4
  East Atlanta Braves 3  
WC Colorado Rockies 1  
  East Atlanta Braves 4
National League
  Central Cincinnati Reds 0  
Central Cincinnati Reds 3
  West Los Angeles Dodgers 0  

Other champions

Awards and honors

MLB statistical leaders

  American League National League
Type Name Stat Name Stat
AVG Edgar Martínez .356 Tony Gwynn .368
HR Albert Belle 50 Dante Bichette 40
RBI Albert Belle & Mo Vaughn 126 Dante Bichette 128
Wins Mike Mussina 19 Greg Maddux 19
ERA Randy Johnson 2.48 Greg Maddux 1.63

Major league baseball final standings

Note: All teams played 144 games instead of the normal 162 as a consequence of the 1994–95 Major League Baseball strike. Seattle and California each played 145 games due to a one game AL West tiebreaker.
  • The asterisk denotes the club that won the wild card for its respective league.

Managers

American League

Team Manager Comments
Baltimore Orioles Phil Regan
Boston Red Sox Kevin Kennedy
California Angels Marcel Lachemann
Chicago White Sox Gene Lamont Replaced during the season by Terry Bevington
Cleveland Indians Mike Hargrove Won the American League pennant
Detroit Tigers Sparky Anderson
Kansas City Royals Bob Boone
Milwaukee Brewers Phil Garner
Minnesota Twins Tom Kelly
New York Yankees Buck Showalter Replaced after the season by Joe Torre
Oakland Athletics Tony La Russa
Seattle Mariners Lou Piniella
Texas Rangers Johnny Oates
Toronto Blue Jays Cito Gaston

National League

Team Manager Comments
Atlanta Braves Bobby Cox Won the World Series
Chicago Cubs Jim Riggleman
Cincinnati Reds Davey Johnson
Colorado Rockies Don Baylor
Florida Marlins Rene Lachemann
Houston Astros Terry Collins
Los Angeles Dodgers Tommy Lasorda
Montreal Expos Felipe Alou
New York Mets Dallas Green
Philadelphia Phillies Jim Fregosi
Pittsburgh Pirates Jim Leyland
St. Louis Cardinals Joe Torre Replaced during the season by Mike Jorgensen
San Diego Padres Bruce Bochy
San Francisco Giants Dusty Baker

Events

January–June

July–September

October–December

Movies

Births

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

Deaths

January

  • January   2 – Don Elston, 65, two-time All-Star relief pitcher who played for the Chicago Cubs and Brooklyn Dodgers during nine seasons spanning 1953–1964, heading the National League with 69 relief appearances in 1958 and 65 in 1959, while leading all relievers with 127.0 innings pitched in 1960.
  • January   3 – Ollie Bejma, 87, middle infielder and third baseman for the Chicago White Sox and St. Louis Browns in a span of four seasons between 1934 and 1939.
  • January   3 – Bob Darnell, 64, pitcher who played for the Brooklyn Dodgers during the 1954 and 1956 seasons.
  • January   3 – Mickey Haefner, 82, knuckleball left-handed pitcher who played from 1943 through 1950 for the Washington Senators, Chicago White Sox and Boston Braves.
  • January   3 – Jim Tyack, 83, outfielder for the 1943 Philadelphia Athletics.
  • January   4 – Harry Gumbert, 85, pitcher who played with four clubs during 15 seasons from 1935–1950, going 11-3 in 1936 and winning 10 in 1937 for the New York Giants, helping them win back-to-back National League pennant winners, then going 9-5 to help the St. Louis Cardinals clinch the NL pennant in 1942 and 10-5 a year later, en route to the 1942 World Series which the Cardinals beat the New York Yankees, 4 games to 1.
  • January   4 – Ralph Onis, 86, catcher for the 1935 Brooklyn Dodgers.
  • January   7 – Kite Thomas, 71, outfielder who played from 1952 to 1953 for the Philadelphia Athletics and Washington Senators.
  • January 12 – Hi Simmons, 89, head baseball coach at the University of Missouri from 1937 through 1973, guiding his team to the 1954 College World Series title.
  • January 17 – John Hall, 71, pitcher for the 1948 Brooklyn Dodgers.
  • January 18 – Ron Luciano, 57, American League umpire from 1968 to 1980 known for his flamboyance and several books.
  • January 20 – Mark Filley, 82, pitcher for the 1934 Washington Senators.
  • January 21 – Russ Bauers, 80, pitcher for the Pittsburgh Pirates, Chicago Cubs and St. Louis Browns over eight seasons between 1936 and 1950.
  • January 23 – Saul Rogovin, 72, pitcher for the Detroit Tigers, Chicago White Sox, Baltimore Orioles, and Philadelphia Phillies in a span of eight seasons from 1949–1957, while leading the American League with a 2.78 ERA in 1951.
  • January 24 – Herb Karpel, 77, pitcher for the 1946 New York Yankees.
  • January 26 – Dick Tettelbach, 65, outfielder who played from 1955 through 1957 for the New York Yankees and Washington Senators.
  • January 30 – Buddy Gremp, 75, first baseman for the Boston Braves from 1940 to 1942.

February

  • February   6 – Elmer Burkart, 78, pitcher who played for the Philadelphia Phillies from 1936 to 1940.
  • February   7 – Cecil Upshaw, 52, right-handed reliever who played for five teams during nine seasons from 1966–1975, saving 27 games for the Atlanta Braves in 1969, well known for his unorthodox but effective submarine delivery, as he tore up the ring finger on his pitching hand and had at least two surgeries and rehabbing.
  • February 24 – Woody Williams, 82, second baseman for the Brooklyn Dodgers and Cincinnati Reds in part of two seasons from 1938–1945.
  • February 28 – Wally Millies, 88, backup catcher for the Philadelphia Phillies, Washington Senators and Brooklyn Dodgers in a span of six seasons between 1934 and 1941.

March

  • March   2 – Ray Moore, 68, pitcher who played for the Brooklyn Dodgers, Baltimore Orioles, Chicago White Sox, Washington Senators and Minnesota Twins over 11 seasons from 1952 to 1963.
  • March   5 – Roy Hughes, 84, middle infielder and third baseman for four teams over nine seasons from 1935–1946, who delivered 188 hits and scored 112 runs for the 1936 Cleveland Indians.
  • March 11 – Don Manno, 79, left fielder and third baseman for the Boston Bees and Braves from 1940 to 1941.
  • March 13 – Leon Day, 78, seven-time All-Star pitcher for the Newark Eagles of the Negro Leagues, who set several league strikeout marks, including 18 victims in one game, and was enshrined into the Baseball Hall of Fame just six days before his death.
  • March 14 – Charlie Letchas, 79, backup infielder who played for the Philadelphia Phillies and Washington Senators in a span of four seasons from 1939–1946.
  • March 17 – Jimmy Uchrinscko, 94, pitcher for the 1927 Washington Senators.
  • March 27 – Chet Nichols, 64, pitcher 64, pitcher for the Boston and Milwaukee Braves, Boston Red Sox and Cincinnati Reds during nine seasons between 1951 and 1964, who posted 10 wins and led the National League with a 2.88 ERA in his roolie season.
  • March 29 – Terry Moore, 82, four-time All-Star center fielder for the St. Louis Cardinals in 11 seasons from 1935–1948, who hit a .304 average in 1940, and captained the 1942 and 1946 World Series champion teams.

April

  • April   7 – Frank Secory, 82, National League umpire from 1952 to 1970 who worked in four World Series, six All-Star Games and nine no-hitters, previously a Chicago Cubs outfielder, well known for a pivotal hit in the 1945 World Series.
  • April   9 – Bob Allison, 60, All-Star outfielder for the Washington Senators and Minnesota Twins, who earned the 1959 American League Rookie of the Year award, had three 30-home run seasons, and led the league in triples and runs once each.
  • April 10 – Billy Myers, 84, shortstop who played with the Cincinnati Reds from 1935 to 1940 and for the Chicago Cubs in 1941, being a member of the 1937 National League champion Reds in 1939 and 1949, and best remembered for his game-winning sacrifice fly in Game 7 of the 1940 World Series against the Detroit Tigers.
  • April 13 – Hal Peck, 77, right fielder who played from 1943 to 1949 for the Brooklyn Dodgers, Philadelphia Athletics and Cleveland Indians, and also was a member of the 1948 World Series champion Indians.
  • April 18 – Elizabeth Emry, 72, All-American Girls Professional Baseball League pitcher for the 1946 Racine Belles champion team.
  • April 19 – Jack Wilson, 83, pitcher who played from 1934 through 1942 with the Boston Red Sox, Philadelphia Athletics, Washington Senators and Detroit Tigers.
  • April 23 – Jake Daniel, 85, first baseman for the 1937 Brooklyn Dodgers.
  • April 24 – John Campbell, 87, pitcher for the Washington Senators in the 1933 season.
  • April 27 – Kent Peterson, 69, pitcher who played for the Cincinnati Reds and Philadelphia Phillies in all or part of eight seasons spanning 1944–1953.
  • April 28 – Peaches Davis, 89, pitcher who played from 1936 to 1939 for the Cincinnati Reds.
  • April 28 – Gustavo Polidor, 33, Venezuelan infielder for the California Angels, Milwaukee Brewers and Florida Marlins during seven seasons between 1985 and 1993.
  • April 29 – Ray Prim, 88, pitcher for the Washington Senators, Philadelphia Phillies and Chicago Cubs in a span of six seasons from 1933–1946; one of many ballplayers whose career was interrupted during World War II, who posted a 13-8 record and led National League pitchers with a 2.40 for the pennant winning Cubs in 1945.

May

  • May   4 – Connie Wisniewski, 73, four-time All-American Girls Professional Baseball League All-Star pitcher and outfielder, who set several records in the circuit in an nine-year career from 1944 through 1952.
  • May   7 – Gus Bell, 66, All-Star outfielder, mainly with the Cincinnati Reds, who had four 100-RBI seasons, led the National League in triples in 1951, and was the oldest in a Major League family that includes his son Buddy and his grandsons David and Mike.
  • May   9 – Marguerite Jones, 77, Canadian pitcher who played for the Minneapolis Millerettes and Rockford Peaches of the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League.
  • May 17 – George Metkovich, 74, outfielder and first baseman who played for the Boston Red Sox, Cleveland Indians, Chicago White Sox, Pittsburgh Pirates, Chicago Cubs and Milwaukee Braves in a span of ten seasons from 1943–1954.
  • May 18 – Jack Kramer, 77, three-time All-Star pitcher, who led the St. Louis Browns to their only World Series appearance in 1944.
  • May 19 – Fred Frink, 83. outfielder for the 1934 Philadelphia Phillies.
  • May 23 – Ab Wright, 89, outfielder who played with the Cleveland Indians in the 1935 season and for the Boston Braves in 1944.
  • May 30 – Glenn Burke, 42, center fielder for the Los Angeles Dodgers and Oakland Athletics in four seasons from 1978–1979, who was the first player in Major League history to publicly acknowledge his homosexuality during his professional career.
  • May 31 – Norm Brown, 76. pitcher who played for the Philadelphia Athletics in the 1943 and 1946 seasons.

June

  • June   7 – Eddie Lake, 79, middle infielder and third baseman who played for the St. Louis Cardinals, Boston Red Sox and Detroit Tigers during eleven seasons spanning 1939–1950.
  • June   9 – Zoilo Versalles, 55, Cuban two-time All-Star and two-time Gold Glove shortstop who led the Minnesota Twins to the 1965 American League pennant, as well as the first Latin American player to win the Most Valuable Player Award, while leading the league in triples three times and in doubles and runs once each.
  • June 10 – Stan Andrews,78, backup catcher who played for the Boston Bees, Brooklyn Dodgers and Philadelphia Phillies. in a span of four seasons from 1939–1945.
  • June 10 – Lindsey Nelson, 76, broadcaster for the New York Mets from 1962 to 1979, and later for the San Francisco Giants and NBC.
  • June 17 – Bruce Campbell, 85, right fielder for five clubs during 13 seasons from 1930–1942, who returned from a bout with spinal meningitis in 1936 while playing for the Cleveland Indians, to get six hits in a nine-inning ball game and reach a .372 average in 172 at-bats, appearing also in all seven games of the 1940 World Series with the Detroit Tigers, posting a batting line of .360/.448/.520 with one home run and six RBI, while batting sixth in the line-up behind Charlie Gehringer, Hank Greenberg and Rudy York.

July

  • July   4 – Adeline Kerrar, 70, All-American Girls Professional Baseball League catcher and infielder.
  • July   4 – Al Unser, 82, backup catcher who played with the Detroit Tigers from 1942 to 1944 and for the Cincinnati Reds 1945, being one of many ballplayers who only appeared in the major leagues during World War II.
  • July 17 – Herb Hippauf, 56, relief pitcher for the 1966 Atlanta Braves.
  • July 27 – Rick Ferrell, 89, Hall of Fame and eigth-time All-Star catcher who played for the St. Louis Browns, Boston Red Sox and Washington Senators from 1929–1947, whose 1,806 career-games caught were an American League record until 1988, being also a batterymate of his brother Wes Ferrell with the Red Sox from 1934 through 1938.

August

  • August   1 – Ruby Knezovich, 77, Canadian catcher who played from 1943 to 1944 in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League.
  • August   3 – Harry Craft, 80, manager of the Houston Colt .45s in their 1962 debut, who also managed the Kansas City Athletics and Chicago Cubs, and previously was a Cincinnati Reds center fielder.
  • August   4 – Dick Bartell, 87, All-Star shortstop for five teams, known for his combative personality, who batted .300 five times and scored 100 runs three times, while batting .381 for the New York Giants in the 1936 World Series.
  • August 13 – Mickey Mantle, 63, Hall of Fame and 16-time All-Star center fielder, as well as a powerful switch-hitter for the New York Yankees, being a successor to Babe Ruth and Joe DiMaggio as symbol of the Yankees' long reign, who earned the American League MVP Award from 1956–1957 and in 1962, while setting a record with 18 home runs in World Series play, hitting .300 or more ten times, leading the AL in runs six times to set an all-time record, winning the 1956 Triple Crown, four home run titles –hitting 50 twice–, and retiring with the third most career HRs (536) and walks (1733) in MLB history, including career marks for runs (1677), RBI (1509) and slugging percentage (.557).
  • August 20 – Bill Kennedy, 76, pitcher who played for the Washington Senators in a span of three seasons from 1942–1947.
  • August 20 – Von McDaniel, 56, pitcher who joined his elder brother Lindy on the 1957–1958 St. Louis Cardinals pitching staff, throwing a complete game, two-hit shutout for St. Louis in his debut against the defending National League champion Brooklyn Dodgers in 1957,[1] winning his first four decisions, including 19 consecutive scoreless innings and a one-hitter, even though a breakdown in his pitching mechanics resulted in severe control problems that curtailed his promising pitching career, which caused him to eventually become a third baseman in the minor leagues.[2]
  • August 28 – Juan Rios, 53, Puerto Rican middle infielder who played for the Kansas City Royals in its 1969 inaugural season.

September

  • September   7 – Al Papai, 78, knuckleballer specialist for four major league teams from 1948–1955, and one of 29 players to pitch for the St. Louis Browns and Cardinals clubs.
  • September 15 – Napoleón Reyes, 75, Cuban corner infielder for the New York Giants in part of three seasons spanning 1943–1950, who tied a National League record for the most hit by pitches in a season, being hit on eight occasions in 1945, joining Hall of Famer Mel Ott and All-Star center outfielder Andy Pafko.
  • September 19 – Mem Lovett, 83, who appeared as a pinch-hitter in a single game with the Chicago White Sox in the 1933 season.
  • September 21 – Tony Cuccinello, 87, three-time All-Star second baseman and third baseman for five teams during 15 seasons spanning 1930–1945, who led National League second basemen in assists and double plays three times and hit .300 or better five times, with a career high .315 in 1931, while hitting .308 in 1945, losing the American League batting title in the last day of the season by .001 to Snuffy Stirnweiss.
  • September 21 – Andrew Rozdilsky, 77, who performed as Andy the Clown at Chicago White Sox games from 1960 to 1990.

October

  • October   3 – Nippy Jones,70, backup first baseman for the St. Louis Cardinals, Philadelphia Phillies and Milwaukee Braves in eight seasons between 1946 and 1957, who made a token appearance as a pinch hitter in the 1946 World Series, won by the Cardinals, whose last time at bat in his undistinguished career earned him enduring fame in a memorable shoe-polish incident that helped the Braves win Game 4 of the 1957 World Series en route to the World Championship.[3]
  • October 10 – Ed Gill, 100, pitcher for the 1919 Washington Senators.
  • October 16 – Joe Szekely, 70, right fielder who played with the Cincinnati Redlegs in its 1953 season.
  • October 21 – Vada Pinson, 57, three-time All-Star and Gold Glove center fielder, who spent his 18 year career with five clubs from 1958 through 1975, most prominently with the Cincinnati Reds, leading the National League in hits, doubles and triples twice each, including four 200-hit seasons, while ending his career with 2,757 hits, 256 home runs and 305 stolen bases.
  • October 26 – Lyman Linde, 75, pitcher for the Cleveland Inidians during two seasons from 1947 to 1948.
  • October 29 – Al Niemiec, 84, second baseman who played with the Boston Red Sox in the 1934 season and for the Philadelphia Athletics in 1936.

November

  • November   2 – Sal Gliatto, 93, pitcher for the 1930 Cleveland Indians.
  • November 19 – Ed Wright, 76, pitcher for the Boston Braves and Philadelphia Athletics between 1945 and 1952, who also threw a no-hitter in the American Association in 1945 and hurled the first shutout in Caribbean Series history in 1949.
  • November 22 – Art Smith, 89, pitcher who played for the Chicago White Sox in 1932.
  • November 23 – Lee Rogers, 82, pitcher who played for the Boston Red Sox and Brooklyn Dodgers during the 1938 season.
  • November 24 – Irene Hickson, 80, All-Star catcher who played in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League in a span of nine seasons from 1943–1950, winning the batting title in 1943 and being a member of two championship teams in 1943 and 1946.
  • November 30 – Jim Davis, 69, pitcher for the Chicago Cubs, St. Louis Cardinals and New York Giants from 1954 to 1957, who in 1956 became the first pitcher in 40 years to record four strikeouts in a single inning.
  • November 30 – William Suero, 29, Dominican Republic infielder for the Milwaukee Brewers from 1992 to 1993.

December

  • December   2 – Art Herring, 89, pitcher who played for the Detroit Tigers, Brooklyn Dodgers, Chicago White Sox and Pittsburgh Pirates during eleven seasons spanning 1929–1947.
  • December   5 – Bill Bruton, 70, speedy center fielder for the Milwaukee Braves and Detroit Tigers over eight seasons from 1953 to 1964, who led the National League in stolen bases three times, triples twice and runs once, being also a member of the Braves teams that clinched two NL pennants from 1957–1958 and the 1957 World Series, while tying a MLB record with two bases-loaded triples in one game (1959), to join Elmer Valo (1949) and Duane Kuiper (1978).
  • December 11 – Woody Wheaton, 81, two-way outfielder / pitcher for the Philadelphia Athletics in two seasons from 1943–1944.
  • December 12 – Mike Modak, 73, pitcher for the 1945 Cincinnati Reds.
  • December 17 – George Cox, 91, pitcher who played for the Chicago White Sox in 1928.
  • December 20 – Betty Wanless, 67, All-American Girls Professional Baseball League infielder.
  • December 27 – Al Barlick, 80, Hall of Fame umpire for 28 National League seasons between 1940 and 1971, who officiated seven World Series and a MLB record seven All-Star Games.
  • December 26 – Bob Veselic, 40, relief pitcher for the Minnesota Twins in the 1980 and 1981 seasons.
  • December 27 – Oscar Judd, 87, Canadian All-Star pitcher who played from 1941 through 1948 for the Boston Red Sox and Philadelphia Phillies.

Sources

  1. ^ Brooklyn Dodgers vs St. Louis Cardinals: June 21, 1957 Box Score. Baseball Almanac. Retrieved on December 3, 2018.
  2. ^ Von McDaniel – Article by David E. Skelton. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on December 3, 2018.
  3. ^ Nippy Jones - Article by Dan Fields. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on December 4, 2018.

External links

  • Major League Baseball official website
  • Minor League Baseball official website
  • Baseball Almanac – Major League Baseball Players Who Died in 1995


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