1973 German Grand Prix

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1973 German Grand Prix
Circuit Nürburgring-1967-Nordschleife.svg
Race details
Date 5 August 1973
Official name XXXVIII Großer Preis von Deutschland
Location Nürburgring, Nürburg, Germany
Course Permanent racing facility
Course length 22.835 km (14.19 mi)
Distance 14 laps, 319.690 km (198.65 mi)
Weather Dry
Pole position
Driver Tyrrell-Ford
Time 7:07.8[1]
Fastest lap
Driver Brazil Carlos Pace Surtees-Ford
Time 7:11.4[1] on lap 13
Podium
First Tyrrell-Ford
Second Tyrrell-Ford
Third McLaren-Ford

The 1973 German Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Nürburgring on 5 August 1973. It was race 11 of 15 in both the 1973 World Championship of Drivers and the 1973 International Cup for Formula One Manufacturers.

The 14-lap race was won from pole position by Jackie Stewart, driving a Tyrrell-Ford. It was Stewart's 27th and final Grand Prix victory, a record that would stand until 1987. Teammate François Cevert finished second, with Jacky Ickx third in a McLaren-Ford.

The works March team did not participate in this race following the accident at the Dutch Grand Prix the previous weekend that had claimed the life of Roger Williamson. The Ferrari, Ensign, Tecno and Hesketh teams also did not participate. To boost the field, the McLaren, Brabham and Surtees teams all entered three cars: Ferrari released Ickx to drive the third McLaren; Rolf Stommelen drove the third Brabham in place of the injured Andrea de Adamich; and Jochen Mass drove the third Surtees.

Classification

Pos No Driver Constructor Laps Time/Retired Grid Points
1 5 United Kingdom Jackie Stewart Tyrrell-Ford 14 1:42:03.0 1 9
2 6 France François Cevert Tyrrell-Ford 14 + 1.6 3 6
3 30 Belgium Jacky Ickx McLaren-Ford 14 + 41.2 4 4
4 24 Brazil Carlos Pace Surtees-Ford 14 + 53.8 11 3
5 11 Brazil Wilson Fittipaldi Brabham-Ford 14 + 1:19.9 13 2
6 1 Brazil Emerson Fittipaldi Lotus-Ford 14 + 1:24.3 14 1
7 31 West Germany Jochen Mass Surtees-Ford 14 + 1:25.2 15  
8 17 United Kingdom Jackie Oliver Shadow-Ford 14 + 1:25.7 17  
9 8 United States Peter Revson McLaren-Ford 14 + 2:11.8 7  
10 26 France Henri Pescarolo Iso-Marlboro-Ford 14 + 2:22.5 12  
11 9 West Germany Rolf Stommelen Brabham-Ford 14 + 3:27.3 16  
12 7 New Zealand Denny Hulme McLaren-Ford 14 + 3:38.7 8  
13 12 United Kingdom Graham Hill Shadow-Ford 14 + 3:49.0 20  
14 23 United Kingdom Mike Hailwood Surtees-Ford 13 + 1 Lap 18  
15 18 United Kingdom David Purley March-Ford 13 + 1 Lap 22  
16 15 United Kingdom Mike Beuttler March-Ford 13 + 1 Lap 19  
Ret 10 Argentina Carlos Reutemann Brabham-Ford 7 Engine 6  
Ret 19 Switzerland Clay Regazzoni BRM 7 Engine 10  
Ret 16 United States George Follmer Shadow-Ford 5 Accident 21  
Ret 20 France Jean-Pierre Beltoise BRM 4 Gearbox 9  
Ret 21 Austria Niki Lauda BRM 1 Accident 5  
Ret 2 Sweden Ronnie Peterson Lotus-Ford 0 Ignition 2  
DNS 25 New Zealand Howden Ganley Iso-Marlboro-Ford Accident in qualifying
Source:[2]

Notes

  • Lap leaders: Jackie Stewart (1-14)
  • New Zealander Howden Ganley heavily crashed his Williams/Iso-Marlboro-Ford and the car could not be repaired in time for the race.
  • Austrian Niki Lauda had outqualified his next-fastest teammate Jean-Pierre Beltoise by 8.2 seconds, but due to a suspension failure, he crashed at Kesselchen on the second lap, escaping with a broken wrist, but this accident forced him to miss his home race 2 weeks later.
  • Belgian Jacky Ickx and Swede Ronnie Peterson battled for 3rd on the first lap, but at Breidscheid the failure of the alternator on Peterson's Lotus put him out of the race. He went across the Adenauer Bridge and stopped at Ex-Mühle, and spent the next 3 laps trying to fix the car.
  • The race was rebroadcast in 2003 in the USA on Speed Channel as a special broadcast of their Formula 1 retrospective, Formula One Decade. Commentary was by Jackie Stewart and David Hobbs.[3][4]
  • This was the last race until the 2012 Australian Grand Prix not to feature an Italian driver.

Championship standings after the race

  • Note: Only the top five positions are included for both sets of standings. Only the best 7 results from the first 8 races and the best 6 results from the last 7 races counted towards the Championship. Numbers without parentheses are Championship points; numbers in parentheses are total points scored.

References

  1. ^ a b "Formula One World - History - German Grand Prix 1973". Archived from the original on 15 July 2007. Retrieved 27 June 2010.
  2. ^ "1973 German Grand Prix". formula1.com. Archived from the original on 3 September 2014. Retrieved 22 December 2015.
  3. ^ "Part1". Youtube.com. 2007-09-20. Retrieved 2010-12-12.
  4. ^ "Part2". Youtube.com. 2007-09-20. Retrieved 2010-12-12.


Previous race:
1973 Dutch Grand Prix
FIA Formula One World Championship
1973 season
Next race:
1973 Austrian Grand Prix
Previous race:
1972 German Grand Prix
German Grand Prix Next race:
1974 German Grand Prix
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