1972 in aviation

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Years in aviation: 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975
Centuries: 19th century · 20th century · 21st century
Decades: 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s 2000s
Years: 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975

This is a list of aviation-related events from 1972:

Events

  • Early in the year, the United States introduces the Walleye II optically guided glide bomb into service, employing it in the Vietnam War. It becomes known as the "Fat Albert."[1]

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

  • November 4 – During a domestic flight in Bulgaria from Bourgas to Sofia, a Balkan Bulgarian Airlines Ilyushin Il-14P's (registration LZ-ILA) pilot decides to divert to Plovdiv due to poor visibility at Sofia. An air traffic controller at Plovdiv gives the Il-14P descent instructions without knowing its exact position; following the instructions in poor visibility, the airliner crashes into the side of a hill near Cruncha, killing all 35 people on board.[131]
  • November 6 – Armed with a .38-caliber revolver and claiming to have two bombs, 47-year-old Tatsuji Nakaoka, wearing a mask and traveling under the pseudonym "Kozo Hotta," hijacks a Japan Air Lines Boeing 727 with 126 people on board shortly after it takes off from Tokyo's Haneda Airport for a domestic flight to Fukuoka, Japan. He forces the airliner to return to Haneda Airport, and demands $2 million in U.S. currency and that a Douglas DC-8 be provided to fly him to Cuba, stipulating that the DC-8 stop at Vancouver and in Mexico along the way. After receiving the ransom money, Nakaoka takes eight hostages and boards the DC-8, where several police officers hiding in the main cabin immediately overpower and arrest him.[132][133]
  • November 8 – Four hijackers commandeer a Mexicana de Aviación Boeing 727-200 with 111 people on board making a domestic flight in Mexico from Monterrey to Mexico City and demand a ransom and the release of political prisoners. After six prisoners board the airliner and the ransom is delivered, the hijackers force the plane to fly to Havana, Cuba.[134]
  • November 10–12 – Seeking revenge against the City of Detroit, Michigan, for alleged police brutality and an arrest for sexual assault, Louis Moore and Henry Jackson join with Melvin Cale in hijacking Southern Airways Flight 49, a Douglas DC-9 with 33 people aboard, during a flight from Birmingham to Montgomery, Alabama. Armed with guns and hand grenades, they demand 10 parachutes, 10 bulletproof vests, and a US$10 million ransom, and order the airliner to fly to Detroit to pick it up. Fog prevents a landing there, and the plane diverts to Cleveland, Ohio, while the hijackers consume the plane's liquor supply. They then order the plane to fly on to Toronto, Ontario, Canada, where Southern Airways offers them US$500,000. Moore rejects this and orders the plane to take off again and fly to Knoxville, Tennessee, but before arrival there orders the plane to circle the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, threatening to crash the plane into the nuclear reactor there unless his demands are not met. Southern Airways collects 150 pounds (68 kg) of cash totaling $2 million, and gives it to the hijackers when the airliner lands at Chattanooga, Tennessee, hoping the hijackers will be too impressed by the physical amount of cash to realize it is less than they demanded. The ruse works, and the jubilant hiackers hand out cash to the passengers and crew, but then order the plane to fly to Havana, Cuba, where authorities refuse to allow the hijackers to disembark. The airliner takes off again, stops at Key West, Florida, and then lands at a United States Air Force base near Orlando, Florida, where Federal Bureau of Investigation agents damage its landing gear with gunfire. It again flies to Havana, arriving there on November 12, and Cuban authorities arrest and jail the hijackers and impound the ransom for return to Southern Airways. The hijacking prompts a change of heart among airlines and transportation authorities in the United States, who previously had viewed hijacking as a relatively benign interference in their business which rarely resulted in harm to anyone and not worth the inconvenience and expense of preventing it, and leads to the requirement to screen all passengers boarding airliners in the United States beginning in January 1973.[135][136]
  • November 15 – The first attenpted aircraft hijacking in Australia takes place when Miloslav Hrabinec attempts to hijack Ansett Airlines Flight 232, a Fokker F27 Friendship with 31 other people on board, as it is descending to land at Alice Springs. He demands a parachute and to be flown 1,000 miles (1,610 km) into the desert. After landing at Alice Springs, he releases 22 passengers, then threatens to begin shooting the rest of the people on board if not given a light plane, a pilot, and a parachute. After he leaves the Fokker to approach the light plane with a flight attendant as a hostage, he wounds a policeman, is brought under fire by police, and then shoots himself to death.
  • November 22 – While U.S. Air Force B-52 Stratofortresses fly their heaviest raids of the Vietnam War at the time during the day,[137] a North Vietnamese surface-to-air missile hits a B-52 over North Vietnam near Vinh; its crew manages to fly it to Thailand before ejecting. It is the first time in history that a B-52 has been lost to enemy action.[55][137]
  • November 24 – A hijacker seizes control of an Air Canada Douglas DC-8 bound from Frankfurt-am-Main, West Germany, to Montreal, Quebec, Canada, and demands the release of political prisoners. Police storm the airliner at Frankfurt Airport and arrest the hijacker. One person is killed during the hijacking.[138]
  • November 28

December

First flights

January

February

May

June

July

September

October

December

Entered service

April

October

Retirements

August

November

References

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  3. ^ Mondey, David, ed., The Complete Illustrated History of the World's Aircraft, Secaucus, New Jersey: Chartwell Books, Inc., 1978, ISBN 0-89009-771-2, p. 65.
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  7. ^ a b "Hijacker caught after parachuting over Colorado with $50,000 in cash". Lewiston Daily Sun. Associated Press. January 21, 1972. p. 1. 
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  9. ^ Taylor, Daniel L. (January 21, 1972). "Parachutist hijacker captured". Eugene Register Guard. UPI. p. 3A. 
  10. ^ "Chuting hijacker caught by police". Spokesman-Review. Associated Press. January 21, 1972. p. 1. 
  11. ^ "Hijacker with $50,000 loot captured after bailing out". Milwaukee Journal. January 21, 1972. p. 1. 
  12. ^ "Hijacker foiled; tracked by jets". Spokane Daily Chronicle. Associated Press. January 21, 1972. p. 19. 
  13. ^ "Hijack figure held without bail". Lewiston Morning Tribune. Associated Press. January 22, 1972. p. 1. 
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  51. ^ Boslaugh, David L., When Computers Went to War: The Digitization of the U.S. Navy, Matt Loeb: 1999, ISBN 0-471-47220-4, p. 354.
  52. ^ Friedman, Norman, "The Navy's Ramjet Missile," Naval History, June 2014, p. 11.
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  72. ^ Associated Press, "Global Pilots' Strike Halts Few US Airlines," Kentucky New Era, June 16, 1972, Page 1.
  73. ^ a b Ruffin, Steven A., Aviation's Most Wanted: The Top Ten Book of Winged Wonders, Lucy Landings, and Other Aerial Oddities, Dulles, Virginia: Potomac Books, Inc., 2005, unpaginated.
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  76. ^ Souza, Mason, "Life in the sky: Leroy Berkebile has led a decorated, historic, and often perilous life as a pilot," mysundaynews.com, September 13, 2012.
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  80. ^ skyjackeroftheday.tumblr.com "Skyjacker of the Day: #4: Nguyen Thai Binh," June 18, 2013.
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  84. ^ Ada Evening News, July 6, 1972, p. 1
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  88. ^ skyjackeroftheday.tumblr.com "Skyjacker of the Day #22: Francis Goodell," May 28, 2013.
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  92. ^ a b United Press International, "Surrender of 3 Terminates Latest Hijacking Attempts," The Wilmington News, July 14, 1972, Page 1.
  93. ^ skyjackeroftheday.tumblr.com "Skyjacker of the Day #25: Lulseged Tesfa," May 25, 2013.
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  128. ^ McCabe, Scott, "Crime History", The Washington Post Express, October 29, 2012, p. 8.
  129. ^ Lewis, Alfred E., and Jay Mathews, "Father, Son Give Up in '72 Killings," The Washington Post, July 8, 1975.
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  143. ^ skyjackeroftheday.tumblr.com "Skyjacker of the Day #40: Larry Stanford," May 10, 2013.
  144. ^ Chinnery, Philip D., Vietnam: The Helicopter War, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1991, ISBN 1-55750-875-5, p. 167.
  145. ^ National Transportation Safety Board Report Number NTSB-AAR-73-15 "Aircraft Accident Report North Central Airlines, Inc., McDonnell Douglas DC-9-31, N954N, and Delta Air Lines, Inc., Convair CV-880, N8807E, O'Hare International Airport, Chicago, December 20, 1972," adopted July 5, 1973
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  148. ^ Donald, David, ed., The Complete Encyclopedia of World Aircraft, New York: Barnes & Noble Books, 1997, ISBN 0-7607-0592-5, p. 26.
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  153. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, ISBN 0-517-56588-9, p. 251.
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