1952 in New Zealand

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1952 in New Zealand

Decades:
See also:

The following lists events that happened during 1952 in New Zealand.

Summary

The population of New Zealand reaches 2 million.

Population

  • Estimated population as of 31 December: 2,024,600[1]
  • Increase since 31 December 1951: 54,100 (2.75%)
  • Males per 100 females: 101.1

Incumbents

Regal and viceregal

Government

The 30th New Zealand Parliament continued. In power was the National government under Sidney Holland.

Parliamentary opposition

Main centre leaders

Events

January

February

March

April

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

Arts and literature

See 1952 in art, 1952 in literature, Category:1952 books

Music

See: 1952 in music

Radio

See: Public broadcasting in New Zealand

Film

See: Category:1952 film awards, 1952 in film, List of New Zealand feature films, Cinema of New Zealand, Category:1952 films

Sport

Athletics

  • Jack Clarke wins his second national title in the men's marathon, clocking 2:38:42 on 1 March in Wanganui.

Chess

  • The 59th National Chess Championship was held in Napier, and was won by Ortvin Sarapu of Christchurch (his first title).[4]

Cricket

Various Tours, New Zealand cricket team

Horse racing

Harness racing

Lawn bowls

The national outdoor lawn bowls championships are held in Dunedin.[7]

  • Men's singles champion – Frank Livingstone (Onehunga Bowling Club)
  • Men's pair champions – R.K. Aitchison, E. Ravenwood (skip) (North-East Valley Bowling Club)
  • Men's fours champions – N.M. Johnston, W.J. Ashton, M.J. Squire, K.S. Ewing (skip) (Stratford Bowling Club)

Olympic Games

Summer Olympics

 Gold  Silver  Bronze Total
1 0 2 3

Winter Olympics

 Gold  Silver  Bronze Total
0 0 0 0
  • New Zealand sends a team to the Winter Olympics for the first time.

Soccer

  • The Chatham Cup was shared by the finalists North Shore United and Western (Christchurch) after the extra time score (1-1) and all criteria for deciding a winner at that time were equal.[8]
  • The national men's soccer team toured to the Pacific, playing 10 matches, 5 of which were internationals:[9]
    • 31 August, Suva: NZ 1 - 0 Suva
    • 3 September, Suva: NZ 8 - 3 Southern Districts
    • 7 September, Suva: NZ 2 - 0 Fiji
    • 9 September, Lautoka: NZ 0 - 0 Lautoka
    • 11 September, Lautoka: NZ 5 - 0 Northern Districts
    • 14 September, Lautoka: NZ 9 - 0 Fiji
    • 16 September, Suva: NZ 5 - 2 Fiji
    • 21 September, Papeete: NZ 2 - 2 Tahiti
    • 25 September, Fautaua: NZ 7 - 1 Chinese Selection
    • 28 September, Papeete NZ 5 - 3 Tahiti
  • Provincial league champions:[10]
    • Auckland: Eastern Suburbs AFC
    • Canterbury: Technical OB
    • Hawke's Bay: West End
    • Manawatu: Palmerston North United
    • Nelson: Settlers
    • Northland: Otangarei United
    • Otago: Northern AFC
    • Poverty Bay: Thistle
    • South Canterbury: Thistle
    • Southland: Brigadiers
    • Taranaki: Overseas
    • Waikato: Pukemiro Junction
    • Wairarapa: Masterton B
    • Wanganui: Technical College Old Boys
    • Wellington: Petone

Births

Deaths

See also

References

  1. ^ Statistics New Zealand:Historical Population Estimates
  2. ^ Statistics New Zealand: New Zealand Official Yearbook, 1990. ISSN 0078-0170 page 52
  3. ^ "Elections NZ - Leaders of the Opposition". Archived from the original on 17 October 2008. Retrieved 6 April 2008.
  4. ^ List of New Zealand Chess Champions Archived 14 October 2008 at the Wayback Machine.
  5. ^ "List of NZ Trotting cup winners". Archived from the original on 22 February 2012. Retrieved 6 May 2009.
  6. ^ Auckland Trotting cup at hrnz.co.nz Archived 17 June 2009 at the Wayback Machine.
  7. ^ McLintock, A.H., ed. (1966). "Bowls, men's outdoor—tournament winners". An Encyclopaedia of New Zealand. Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Retrieved 6 June 2018.
  8. ^ Chatham Cup records, nzsoccer.com Archived 14 March 2009 at the Wayback Machine.
  9. ^ List of New Zealand national soccer matches
  10. ^ "New Zealand: List of champions". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. 1999.
  11. ^ Dougherty, Ian. "Carl Axel Björk". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography. Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Retrieved 23 April 2017.

External links

Media related to 1952 in New Zealand at Wikimedia Commons

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